Doctor in Education: Leadership for Educational Justice

The program prepares educational leaders to recognize the varied levels of social and educational inequity and to serve as advocates for the disenfranchised and under-served that results in their personal and political empowerment. Candidates are consistently encouraged to analyze, debate, and develop productive strategies in response to the principles, challenges, and opportunities of equity and educational justice.

The Doctor in Education, Leadership for Educational Justice (Ed.D.) is a nationally unique program that engages about 20 students per cohort in rigorous study, debate, research, and practice. Our driving mission is to produce scholarly practitioners who are sought for leadership roles in schools, districts, agencies, and public service, as well as faculty positions in institutions of higher education.

Doctor in Education, Leadership for Educational Justice (Ed.D.)

The Doctorate in Leadership for Educational Justice (Ed.D.) is a nationally unique program that engages students in rigorous study, debate, research, and practice. Our driving mission is to produce scholarly practitioners who are sought for leadership roles in schools, districts, colleges, universities, agencies, and public service.

The Doctorate in Leadership for Educational Justice (Ed.D.) program prepares educators to recognize varying levels of social and educational inequity and to serve as advocates for disenfranchised and under-served students, resulting in their personal and political empowerment. Candidates are consistently encouraged to analyze, debate, and develop productive strategies in response to educational justice principles and challenges and opportunities for equity. Graduates become informed educational leaders who actively work to develop ideas and expressions of social justice across educational systems.

A Mission-Focused Doctorate

This nationally recognized program engages about 20 students per cohort in rigorous study, debate, research, and practice. Created for working educators with a flexible schedule, the program has a 3-year and 4-year pathway. Our driving mission is to produce scholarly practitioners who are sought after for leadership roles in schools, districts, agencies, and public service, as well as faculty positions in institutions of higher education.

An Ed.D. for Visionary Leaders of Educational Justice

The Doctorate of Education in Leadership for Educational Justice is intended for students of exceptional drive and ambition who are determined to uphold and promote values of equity and access across educational systems. Our energetic, highly qualified faculty constantly strive to help doctoral students develop academically and professionally. At the same time, candidates are pushed to consider innovative ways they can make a difference in the world of education, improving the lives of learners and strengthening the work of schools.

Through this one-of-a-kind program, students develop the skills and deep understanding of educational justice required to create real change in school systems and other educational institutions - a change that makes a lasting impact on the lives of those who matter the most: the students.

Program Overview

Designed for working educators, this flexible doctoral degree includes evening and weekend classes for students determined to earn a degree without compromising their careers. With both 3 and 4 year pathways, this degree can be completed on a flexible schedule - research included.

The entire program comprises 60-semester credits of advanced graduate work taken over three or four years. The requirements include 21 credits of core content coursework, 15 credits of concentration coursework, 9 credits of methods coursework, and 15 credits of dissertation work.

Social Justice Leadership Core Curriculum

  • Coursework in social justice, leadership, research, history, finance, law, and organization

Select Your Program Concentration

1. Education Administration - for credentialed K-12 school leaders

2. Preliminary Administrative Service Credential - for aspiring K-12 leaders who do not yet have a PASC credential

3. Higher Education and Student Affairs - for aspiring higher education professionals

4. Community-Engaged Leadership in Schools and Society - for teachers who want to make a difference in their community through advancing their classroom work

5. Individual Path: Make Your Own 5 Courses - for leaders in the community who want to create their own program

 

Scholarships and Assistantships

The University of Redlands School of Education has several scholarships and assistantships available for doctoral students of outstanding character and academic performance. To learn more about each of these opportunities, visit our scholarships and assistantships page

Admission Requirements

The Ed.D. applications are accepted three times throughout the year in December, March, and June, though priority is given to applications received by the December and March deadlines. For full application requirements and admission guidelines, please visit our Ed.D. admission page.

Earn a Doctorate in Leadership for Educational Justice

The University of Redlands Ed.D. program for Educational Justice is built to fit into the lives of working educators, so you can earn your degree without giving up your current career. Achieve your goals and establish a career focused on promoting equity and justice across educational systems. Ready to take the next step? Request information today. 

Program Learning Outcomes

The program prepares educational leaders to:

1. Employ a sophisticated understanding of social justice theories to identify and direct responses to educational inequities

2. Apply principles of leadership for social justice to direct a change process

3. Leverage understandings of political, legal, and financial systems to mitigate constraints on equitable educational practices

4. Advocate for just policies and practices for educational institutions and their communities

5. Critically analyze scholarship to inform professional practice and applied research activity

6. Design and implement inquiry relevant to educational leadership and social justice

Core Curriculum

Core courses (21 credits)

EDUC *** Historical foundations in education and social justice (3)
Examines the historical foundations of US education (PK-12 and higher education) through a social justice lens. Explores how gender, race, class, religion, sexuality, and ableism interact with changing purposes, systems, and institution-building of education considering access to, leadership within, and provision of education. Prerequisite: Admission to Ed.D. program.

EDUC 830: Social Justice Theory and Practice (3)
Examines social justice theories and their implications for educational practice and leadership. Identifies the social, cultural, political, and economic factors that influence schooling in a diverse society. Applies multiple perspectives to problems affecting various stakeholders across educational systems (PK-12 and higher education). Prerequisite: Admission to Ed.D. program.

EDUC *** Leadership and practice in education (3)
Deeply examines leadership perspectives in organizations. Utilizing a historical and organizational perspective, critically examines leadership and management, including leadership theories, models, and, application to emerging social justice scholarship and practice. Prerequisite: Admission to Ed.D. program.

EDUC *** Organizational Change and Education (1x3)
Explores organization theory, attending to administration and policy associated with education organization for social justice leaders. Students create a conceptual understanding of education organization and governance so that participants can apply multiple theoretic constructions to critically examine educational organization functioning. Students develop competency as critical examiners of educational organizational functioning. Prerequisite: Admission to Ed.D. program.

EDUC 831:  Education Law, Policy, and Justice 
Explores federal, state, and local education law for PK-12 and higher education systems in the context of the current policy environment. Includes the evolution of state and federal education policy, Constitutional rights for students and educators, and educational practice from a lens of educational justice. Prerequisite: Admission to Ed.D. program. 

EDUC 833:  Education Finance
Explores how revenues are generated, negotiated, distributed, and budgeted to achieve desired educational outcomes in PK-12 and higher education systems. Course topics include funding equity, strategic budgeting, and making financial decisions from a lens of educational justice to create change and support student needs. Prerequisite: Admission to Ed.D. program.

EDUC *** Special topics doctoral seminar (3)
A special topics seminar examining social justice and education leadership across Pk-12 and higher education. Topics alternate according to instructor and year of offering. Prerequisite: Admission to Ed.D. program.

Method Courses (9 credits)

EDUC 841: Quantitative Methods (3) 
Introduces students to the purpose and use of quantitative methods in educational decision making. Through applied projects, this course acquaints students with survey design, sampling, forms of data collection, the preparation of data for statistical analysis, and descriptive statistical procedures. Provides a conceptual overview of quantitative research designs and inferential statistics. 

EDUC 842: Qualitative Methods (3)
This course examines literature about and how to do basic qualitative research. Students will devise and conduct a small study to learn about qualitative research in practice. They will engage in: design, participant recruitment and sampling, data collection (e.g., interviews, observations, and documents), analysis, and write a research paper about their work.

Advanced Methods

Students take one of the following:

EDUC *** Advanced Quantitative Methods (3)
Extends understanding of quantitative research designs and the statistical analyses most appropriate for answering research questions under each for the purpose of educational improvement. Introduces statistical procedures used to make inferences. Supports satisfying the early research project requirement of the program. Prerequisite: 841 and 842

EDUC *** Advanced Qualitative Methods (3)
Extends understanding and skills involved in qualitative research. Explores advanced qualitative design approaches to qualitative data gathering, analysis, and interpretation. Students produce an original piece of qualitative research as part of this course. Supports satisfying the early research project requirement of the program. Prerequisite: 841 and 842


Dissertation (15 credit hours)

EDUC *** Writing a Literature Review A-C (1x3)
A (1): Systematically develops knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to produce a literature review that demonstrates mastery of a topic with an emphasis on each student producing their dissertation literature review. Students will conduct library research, topic refinement, bibliography development, and literature analysis.

B (1): Systematically develops knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to produce a literature review that demonstrates mastery of a topic with an emphasis on each student producing their dissertation literature review. Continues with literature analysis, synthesis, critique, and writing the first draft. Deepens conceptual understanding of research methods used in the literature reviewing.


C (1): Systematically develops knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to produce a literature review that demonstrates mastery of a topic with an emphasis on each student producing their dissertation literature review. Culminates with writing a final draft, including compliance with all technical standards for manuscript preparation.


EDUC 860: Dissertation development and proposal writing A-C(1x3)

A. Students use this course to start work on their dissertation research proposal. With the guidance of the course faculty member students will devise a dissertation topic, recruit a chair, hone in on a research question(s), and produce a piece of work that establishes the importance of the topic and the scope of the problem.
B. Students update and refine their literature review based on the development of the research questions in 860A. Further develop the context, purpose, and scope of their dissertation study.
C. Students submit a dissertation research proposal that includes methodological content congruent with the purpose and scope of the study.

EDUC 861: Dissertation writing (1-9) 
Dissertation writing is completed under the supervision of the candidate’s faculty research chair. Students may also attend a voluntary workshop while enrolled. Normally, candidates enroll in EDUC 861 for three terms for 3 credits each term. If the dissertation process extends longer than 9 credits, candidates enroll in EDUC 862 for 0 credits until finished. Credit/no-credit only. Prerequisite: successful completion of one advanced methods course

EDUC 862 Dissertation writing extension
If the dissertation is not complete and accepted after the awarding of 9 credits of EDUC 861, candidates will need to enroll in this course until the dissertation is completed and accepted. There is a seven-year deadline from the last term of enrollment in EDUC 861 to complete the dissertation.  Credit/no-credit only. 


Concentrations (15 credit hours)


1. Education Administration - for credentialed K-12 school leaders

2. Preliminary Administrative Service Credential - for aspiring K-12 leaders who do not yet have a PASC credential

3. Higher Education and Student Affairs - for aspiring higher education professional

4. Community-Engaged Leadership in Schools and Society - for teachers who want to make a difference in their community through advancing their classroom work

5. Individual Path: Make Your Own 5 Courses - for leaders in the community who want to create their own program


Non-load bearing program requirements (0 credit hours)

EDUC 890: Core content exam (0)
Taken during August at the end of the first year (for 3 year pathway), students will answer a take-home prompt for their core content exam. If students pass, they proceed to the second year of courses. If students fail, they proceed to second-year courses but must enroll in a 0 credit support course to help prepare to take the exam a second time. Students may choose to reduce their courses and take their concentration classes after passing the core content exam but this will lengthen their program. Students take the exam a second time in April. If students fail twice, they are dismissed from the program.

EDUC 899: Student success seminar (0)
To support students as they prepare to take the first-year exam for a second time. Students take in Fall and Spring before taking the core course exam in April. Prerequisite: failure of core course exam

Early Research Project Requirement (0)
The early research project reinforces skills students need as part of their readiness to engage in the dissertation. The project is submitted as the final paper in their advanced methods course. Passing the course fulfills the requirement. Failing the course does not fulfill the requirement.

Dissertation (0)
Students design, conduct, write and submit an individual research project working with a chair and committee of faculty members with expertise in their topic area.

Dissertation proposal defense (0)
Students must defend their dissertation proposal to their committee to progress to conducting the research.

Dissertation defense (0)
Students must successfully defend their dissertation work to their committee to be able to earn their degree.

 

Doctorate for Leadership in Educational Justice Pathway

Concentration: Higher Education and Student Affairs

Concentration in Higher Education and Student Affairs

The concentration in Higher Education and Student Affairs (15 credits) exposes students to the social, cultural, and organizational contexts of higher education, theories of leadership and student development, and discussion of current issues.

Students in this concentration will select five content courses from the Higher Education and Student Affairs program.

Required: EDUC 607 Higher Education in the United States: Contexts and Populations (3)

This graduate survey course examines five themes in American higher education: (a) history of higher education, (b) educational access, (c) student populations, (d) roles of educators, and (e) current context. 

And will also choose four courses from the following options:

EDUC 605 Community College Today (3)

EDUC 606 Topics in Higher Education (3)

Topics courses address questions, theories, and practices related to a special topic or area in higher education. Prerequisite: EDUC 607 or by permission of instructor.

 

EDUC 608 Evaluation and Assessment (3)

Emphasis on the evaluation of program efficiency, effectiveness, and impact, as well as the assessment of learning in and out of classroom settings in higher education. Intends to build the skills of planning, development, implementation, analysis, and communication of findings in projects related to evaluation and assessment.

 

EDUC 611 Introduction to College Student Affairs (3)

Student affairs is integral to students’ experiences and success. This introductory course examines four areas as a foundation for student affairs practice: 1) the historical context of student affairs; 2) philosophy and ethics of the profession; 3) functional units and their purpose; and 4) core concepts as part of student affairs practice.  

 

EDUC 612 Popular Culture, Media, and Higher Education (3)

This class explores the representation of higher education in popular culture and applies what is learned to higher education research and practice. Students consider the use of media as part of their professional practice.  

 

EDUC 624 Introduction to College Student Development Theory (3)

This course introduces students to the main theories of college student development. Students will become familiar with and develop their own understanding of holistic, psychosocial, cognitive, and social identity theories related to college student development. Students will consider what these theories mean for their work in institutions of higher education.

 

EDUC 631 Law, Policy, and Finance in Higher Education (3)

Students in this course explore law, policy, and finance issues in higher education. The purpose is threefold; 1) to develop an understanding of these issues at the international, national, state, and institutional levels; 2) to conduct an analysis of these areas; 3) to develop an integrated view of law, policy, and finance for practice.  

 

EDUC 633 Working with College Students (3)

This course investigates the role and function of student affairs professionals working with college students. The various functional areas that comprise student services, contemporary issues in student services, and the role of assessment in student affairs will be addressed. 

 

EDUC 669 Diversity in Higher Education (3)

This course introduces students to theory, research, and practice related to diversity in American higher education. Students learn about crucial topics such as those related to discrimination and privilege, as well as developing a critical understanding of what these issues mean for institutions and their own professional practice.  

 

Concentration in Higher Education and Student Affairs Pathway

Concentration: Education Administration (PASC Credential)

Education Administration (PASC Credential)

The concentration in Education Administration with an embedded preliminary administrative services credential (PASC) provides candidates with the opportunity to expand on their leadership skills in a deep and meaningful way, meet the state standards for educational leadership, engage in meaningful fieldwork in education administration, and complete the state performance assessment for education leaders (California Administrator Performance Assessment - CalAPA). 

In this five-course series, students engage in a deep dive into program evaluation and assessment; education law, finance, and personal management; coaching and teacher development; and, applied leadership skills in leadership labs.

Five Courses for the Concentration:

EDUC ***: School law, finance, and personnel management (3)
Introduction to and application of: 1) education federal and state laws and legal opinions; 2) California school finance and; 3) California personnel law, practices, and procedures. Topics covered include constitutional law, administrative law, federal, state, and district, and school policies that contribute to positive school climate and improvement.

EDUC 643: Coaching and Teacher Development (3)
Introduction to the foundational theories of curriculum design and implementation, adult learning, and professional development. Students will apply theory to create professional development strategies in support of teacher performance.

EDUC 670: Program Evaluation and Assessment (3)
Emphasis on the theoretical and practical perspectives of management and evaluation of programs and program design. Introduction to organizational theory, improvement science, and equity-oriented change. Application to focused school improvement program proposal, including design, implementation, and evaluation strategies.

EDUC 675: Curriculum and Program Development (3)
Consideration of the philosophical, historical, and contemporary elements of curriculum. Attention given to team-based planning, development, implementation, and evaluation of curricular programs. Additional topics include best practices pertaining to social and emotional learning, special needs programs, and communities of practice.

EDUC 634A: Leadership Lab A (1)
In this one-hour field experience, students are introduced to the expectations of the Educational Administration program, professional standards, state licensure requirements, and the CalAPA; practice the skills needed to successfully complete CalAPA Cycle 1: Analyzing Data to Inform School Improvement and Promote Equity. Co-requisite EDUC 635A (zero-unit CalAPA registration).

EDUC 634B: Leadership Lab B (1)
In this one-hour field experience, students practice the skills needed to successfully complete CalAPA Cycle 2: Facilitating Communities of Practice and reflect on their applications of theory to practice. Students will work on professional growth and identify practice-based opportunities for applied leadership. Co-requisite EDUC 635B (zero-unit CalAPA registration).

EDUC 634C: Leadership Lab C (1)
In this one-hour field experience, students practice the skills needed to successfully complete CalAPA Cycle 3: Supporting Teacher Growth and reflect on their applications of theory to practice. Students will work on short- and long-term professional growth and identify practice-based opportunities for applied leadership. Co-requisite EDUC 635C (zero-unit CalAPA registration).

 

Concentration in Education Administration (PASC Credential) Pathway

Concentration: Education Administration (with no credential)

Concentration: Education Administration (with no credential)

The concentration in Education Administration (with no credential) provides candidates, particularly those who already possess an administrative credential, with the opportunity to expand on their leadership skills in a deep and meaningful way. Students in this concentration will select five content courses from the Education Administration Program.

Five Courses Eligible for the Education Administration Concentration (without credential):

EDUC 602 Leadership for Diverse Populations (3)
Examination of how leaders adapt communication, leadership style, social, emotional, and academic services to support the success of all students. Emphasis on the relationship of race, ethnicity, gender, class, and culture on student success in classrooms, schools, and educational systems.

EDUC 641 Leadership for Change (3)
Introduction to theories and strategies of personal and organizational change. Emphasis on personal and organizational reflective practice, the dynamics of nested educational communities, and the purpose and process of implementing change to improve student learning and school culture.

EDUC 643: Coaching and Teacher Development (3)
Introduction to the foundational theories of curriculum design and implementation, adult learning, and professional development. Students will apply theory to create professional development strategies in support of teacher performance.

EDUC 670: Program Evaluation and Assessment (3)
Emphasis on the theoretical and practical perspectives of management and evaluation of programs and program design. Introduction to organizational theory, improvement science, and equity-oriented change. Application to focused school improvement program proposal, including design, implementation, and evaluation strategies.

EDUC 671 Ethical and Reflective Leadership (3)
Introduction to leadership theory, problem framing, individual leadership assessment, and administrative styles. Emphasis on organizational management, ethical decision making, problem solving, and reflective practice.

EDUC 673 School Resource Management (3)
Introduction to sound fiscal procedures and budgeting, including an examination of federal, state, and local educational financing. Topics include equitable resource management, setting budgetary priorities at the school site, facilities management, and school modernization.

EDUC 674 Education Law and Policy (3)
Introduction to and application of federal and state laws and legal opinions as they relate to educational policies and procedures. Topics covered include constitutional law, administrative law, district policies, and school governance and politics in relation to positive school climate and improvement.

EDUC 675: Curriculum and Program Development (3)
Consideration of the philosophical, historical, and contemporary elements of curriculum. Attention given to team-based planning, development, implementation, and evaluation of curricular programs. Additional topics include best practices pertaining to social and emotional learning, special needs programs, and communities of practice.

EDUC 676 School Personnel Management (3)
Examination of techniques and styles for selecting, supervising, and evaluating school personnel. Includes opportunities to observe and monitor staff performance and offers various professional in-service approaches. Topics include employee relations, motivation, and negotiations.

 

Concentration in Education Administration (no credential) Pathway

Concentration: Community Engaged Leadership in Schools and Society

Concentration in Community-Engaged Leadership in Schools and Society

The concentration in Community-Engaged Leadership in Schools and Society (15 credits) provides candidates with opportunities to explore the power and promise of community-embedded approaches to social change.

Students in this concentration will take five courses examining the role of educational leaders in promoting democratic participation in K-12 schools and communities.

EDUC *** Race, Equity and Schools (3)

EDUC *** Literacy and Democracy (3)

EDUC *** Education and Community Organizing (3)

EDUC 601/MALT601 Inside-Out (Foundations of Learning) (3) Introduction to the field of education; its history, major philosophies, socio-cultural context, diversity, pedagogy, educational psychology, legal issues, and educational reform. Integrates traditional educational thinking with culturally relevant perspectives based on current research on practice. 

EDUC *** Special Topics in Community-Engaged Leadership (3)

 

Concentration in Community Engaged Leadership in Schools and Society Pathway

Concentration: General

General Concentration

The general concentration (15 credits) provides a lot of choices and is intended to allow students to take a range of graduate courses, as per their interests.

Students should discuss possible choices with their advisor or dissertation chair.

Ed.D. Dissertations in Leadership for Educational Justice

 

See additional published dissertations

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