Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

The Director
Jennifer Nelson

The Faculty Committee
Jessie Hewitt, History
Shana Higgins, Armacost Library
Dorene Isenberg, Economics
Priya Jha, English
Kimberly Welch, Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Friends of Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
There are also diverse faculty and administrators who work with Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies by offering cross-listed courses, sponsoring internships or directed studies, and advising the program on projects.

The Program
Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies is an interdisciplinary program that brings together diverse sources of research, analysis, insight, and experience to examine women’s concerns and gender issues related to gender and sexuality. The rapid pace of change in current societies includes major shifts in the power, social circumstances, ideas, needs, and desires of women, men, and children. Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies is multiracial and multicultural. Our courses may explore specific or wide-ranging areas, as well as historical background and controversial topics.

A Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies major or minor can equip students to better understand and actively participate in social changes. This course of study can lead to many different paths, including preparation for professional specialization in diverse fields (such as law, government, psychology, social work, education, medicine, the arts, religion, and business), public service work and activism, and a clearer comprehension of personal and global issues. Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies is grounded in valuing knowledge from both analysis and experience. Our courses embody a commitment to shared approaches to learning.

Learning outcomes for this program may be found at www.redlands.edu/BA-WGS/learning-outcomes.

The Major
Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies is an interdisciplinary program offering courses carrying the WGS designation and cross-listed courses from many departments.

Bachelor of Arts

Requirements for the Major (48 credits)

Foundation (1 course/4 credits)

Introductory courses include the ones listed, select First-Year Seminars taught by WGS faculty, and other courses approved by the Director.

WGS 145 Gender, Sexuality, and Power in Global Contexts (4 Credits)

This course introduces students to the discipline of Women’s and Gender Studies by providing an overview of prominent societal issues faced by women and others in marginalized identity groups. We will be primarily concerned with the complex interactions between gender and other social divisions such as race, class, ability, and sexual orientation.

WGS 150 Introduction to Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (4 Credits)

This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to introduce students to the interdisciplinary field of Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies by providing an overview of prominent societal issues faced by women and others in marginalized identity groups. We will be primarily concerned with the complex interactions between gender and other social divisions such as race, class, ability, and sexual orientation.

WGS 153 Queer Culture and Identity in the 20th Century (4 Credits)

The course features several distinct units, each of which will focus on a different part of the 20th-century gay experience. The course will address the historical development of the LGBTI identities as well as the future of distinctly queer sensibilities in an era typified by assimilation of LGBTI individuals into mainstream social structures such as marriage and parenthood.

Theory & Activism (2 courses/8 credits)

At least one theory course and one activism course required. Theory courses include the courses listed and other courses approved by the Director. 

WGS 340 Film Feminisms (4 Credits)

Introduction to theoretical frameworks developed around women, gender, feminism, and film studies, using both canonical and non-canonical films and using these films to discuss pressing issues in feminist and gender theory. You will also interrogate the role of the spectator in the production of meaning in film. 
Offered in alternate years.

WGS 341 Gender and Nation (4 Credits)

This course explores the ways gender informs our understanding of nationalism, and how nationalist discourses imagine and construct identities in specifically gendered, class, race, community, and caste terms in various locales. We will read a variety of different works by feminist scholars, political scientists, literary critics, and historians. 

WGS 359 Queer Theories (4 Credits)

This course focuses on a range of queer theories with an emphasis on intersecting marginalizations. Theoretical approaches draw links between disability, performativity and subjectivity; queer temporalities; urban space and gentrification; native, queer settler colonial, and neocolonial epistemologies; and transnational labor and migration.

ECON 240 Economics of Race, Class, and Gender (4 Credits)

The economic position of women and minorities in society. Racial and sexual discrimination, women’s labor force participation, occupational segregation, domestic work, immigration of workers, and racial marginalization in market economies. Mediating influences such as education, spatial forces, and institutional and public policies. Gender/race relations in industrial/Third World countries.
Prerequisites: ECON 100 or ECON 101 or by permission. 
Offered in alternate years. 

ENGL 351 Postcolonial, Global, & Transnational Literatures (4 Credits)

Survey of critical and creative texts from nations that have experienced colonization by European empires, particularly Britain. Studies how national, cultural, and individual identities have been radically altered by this experience. Themes include identity, power, migration, race, gender, representation and resistance. Pays close attention to social, cultural and historical contexts. 
Prerequisite: ENGL 201 OR ENGL 202 recommended.

ENGL 403 Contemporary Literary Criticism and Theory (4 Credits)

Exploration of representative schools of current literary theory. Topics may vary, but the course is a combination of theory with readings in fiction and poetry. 
Prerequisite: junior standing or by permission.

POLI 317 Feminist Political Theory (4 Credits)

Survey of the philosophical/theoretical approaches taking gender as central to the analysis, investigation, and explication of politics and political phenomena. Topics may include the social construction of gender, power, and identity; oppression and liberation; feminist legal theory; women and democracy; gender and race; etc. 
Offered in alternate years.

PSYC 320 Psychology of Gender (4 Credits)

Survey of biological, psychological, and sociocultural issues relevant to the psychology of gender. Emphasis on cultural images of men, women, and children; gender differences and similarities; gender-role socialization; sexuality and reproduction; psychological adjustment; and interpersonal relations. 
Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or by permission.

SOAN 320 Self in Society (4 Credits)

Focus on the definition of the individual and the meaning of individuality in society. Concentration on the study of the “self” allows students to see how the individual is both created from, and a creator of, the social order. Language and basic processes of social interaction are explored. 
Prerequisite: SOAN 100 or SOAN 102, or by permission. 
Offered as needed.

SOAN 321 Gender and Emotion (4 Credits)

Explores how ideas of gender and ideas of emotions co-construct existing inequalities and stereotypes in society. Focus is on the social definitions, constraints, displays and uses of emotions and how these articulate gendered identities. 
Prerequisites: SOAN 100 or SOAN 102 and SOAN 320, or by permission.

SOAN 329 Anthropology of Mothering (4 Credits)

This course will examine concepts of motherhood and how practices of mothering are culturally created, upheld, and naturalized in various societies. Topics addressed include breastfeeding, mothering and sexuality, single mothering, adoption, medical technologies, surrogate mothers, lesbian mothers, trans-racial mothers, teen mothers, and more. 
Prerequisite: SOAN 100, or SOAN 102, or SOAN 104; and junior standing plus two SOAN courses at the 200 level or above; or by permission. 
Offered as needed.

SOAN 342 Gender and Sexuality (4 Credits)

Gender and sexuality in various cultural areas around the world, and consideration of the significance and implications of gender and sexuality in the social life of these people, while introducing current theoretical issues in the cross-cultural study of gender and sexuality.
Prerequisite: SOAN 100, or SOAN 102, or by permission. 
Offered as needed.

SOAN 345 Interrogating Masculinity (4 Credits)

Exploration of Western thought about masculinities. Examines the relationship between masculinities and femininities, power, class, race, disability, sexual orientation, and popular culture. Issues under consideration include the negotiation of gender and sexual identity, work/family conflicts, violence and dating.
Prerequisite: SOAN 100, or SOAN 102, one 200-level SOAN course, or by permission.

Activism Courses Include:

Please note: WGS 180 and WGS 280 Exploratory Internships (2–4) and WGS 380 and WGS 480 Specialized Internships (2–4) are included as-well-as other courses approved by the director. 

WGS 230 Feminist Community Engagement (4 Credits)

Explores the connections between theory and practice with academic readings on activism and community building and student experiences as interns or community activists with non-profit organizations. Possible topics for projects are sexual violence, battering, poverty among women, self-defense, women and the law, reproductive rights, or women’s health issues. 
Offered in alternate years.

WGS 240 Feminist and Social Justice Activism (4 Credits)

Students will begin the course focusing on the theoretical underpinnings of campus activism, including an analysis of initiatives with a feminist and social justice twist. With that background in place, students will put theory into practice by developing individual or group activist projects.

WGS 427 Women in Collective Action (4 Credits)

Study of contemporary and historical examples of women affecting change in society. Examination of theories of social movements and change as applied to women’s efforts politically and culturally to transform the social order. Examples drawn from the United States and other countries. 
Prerequisite: WGS 150 or by permission. 
Offered as needed.

BUS 410 Organizational Consulting (2-4 Credits)

An advanced management class that places student teams in organizational settings solving real client challenges. Students use conventional and design thinking processes to develop strategy for connecting with stakeholders, improve operations, and collect research key to decision making. Students are needed from across the college to make this class a success.
Prerequisite: BUS 310 recommended.

Methods (1 Course/4 credits)
At least one 4-credit course must be a WGS methods course or other methods course appropriate to the focus of the major, chosen in consultation with the student’s WGS advisor.

Electives (24 credits)
Electives will be selected from WGS and WGS cross-listed courses in consultation with a majoring student’s WGS advisor. Electives will help EGS majors explore their own learning goals and map out a course of study toward those goals. Majoring students will work closely with their advisors to develop an individualized plan reflective of their particular interdisciplinary interests. 

Capstone (8 credits)

Please note: all majors enroll in the fall of their senior year for 4 credits. WGS Senior Project: all majors complete an Independent Senior Project (WGS 470) or Honors Research Project (WGS 499) in the spring of their senior year for 4 credits.

WGS 459 Senior Seminar (4 Credits)

Students synthesize and reflect on their interdisciplinary Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies learning. All students design and develop a research paper or project. Those who are Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies majors do so in consultation with their advisor and plan for a Directed Study to complete their paper or project in spring. 
Prerequisites: WGS 150, two 200-level courses (WGS or Cross-listed), one 300- or 400-level course (WGS or Cross-listed), and senior standing, or by permission.

The Minor
The minor consists of 24 credits. Students are required to take a 100-level WGS course as a core interdisciplinary course. Students may shape the minor to enhance their major program and can do so in consultation with the director or other members of the Faculty Advisory Committee.

Registration Information
Each semester at registration, then later at check-in, the Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program provides a current list of WGS and cross-listed courses for the coming term. Because the Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program is growing and new courses (including Johnston courses and special topics courses in various departments) are likely to be added, this list always will have the most current course offerings. Current WGS course listings are available in Larsen Hall 207 and from the director, and are distributed to every faculty advisor. They also are posted on the Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies bulletin board next to Larsen 220.

Directed Study and Internships
Students can design a course of directed study, WGS 170, WGS 270, WGS 370, and WGS 470, with the director or with other WGS faculty members in consultation with the director, whose signature is required on the Individualized Study form. Internships—both exploratory (WGS 180, WGS 280) and specialized (WGS 380, WGS 480)—offer the opportunity for learning more about particular employment and community service settings. Internships can also be student-initiated and negotiated with the director.

The following internships are available each Fall and Spring semester and include:
•WGS 180.01 San Bernardino Sexual Assault Services (4). Training to become a volunteer advocate for SBSAS. Credit may also be earned for volunteer work as an advocate after training. 
•WGS 180.02 Battered Women’s Shelter (2–4). Training to become a volunteer for Option House Shelter for battered women and their children
•WGS 180.03 Gender Justice Center (2–4). Specific focus negotiated with student facilitators of the Gender Justice Center and the Director of the Center.
•WGS 180.04 Pride Center (2–4). Specific focus negotiated with student facilitators of the Pride Center and the Director of the Center. 
•WGS 180.05 Planned Parenthood (2-4). Volunteer services will be negotiated with Planned Parenthood. Application to Planned Parenthood must be approved by the organization. 
•WGS 180.06–09 Student proposed (2-4).

Cross-Listed Courses

These courses are described by their own departments. Check the appropriate departmental listings for full descriptions and prerequisites, if any. They are regularly applicable to Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and may be counted automatically toward the major or the minor. These courses concentrate entirely or significantly on women’s gender issues associated with sexuality and sexual identity.

Please note: course offerings also include, JNST Feminist Film Activism, JNST Forbidden Love: Literatures of Lesbian Desire, JNST Gay, Lesbian, and Queer Cinemas, JNST Odd Characters in Literature, JNST Transgender Dialectic, and JNST Intersectionality. 

ECON 240 Economics of Race, Class, and Gender (4 Credits)

The economic position of women and minorities in society. Racial and sexual discrimination, women’s labor force participation, occupational segregation, domestic work, immigration of workers, and racial marginalization in market economies. Mediating influences such as education, spatial forces, and institutional and public policies. Gender/race relations in industrial/Third World countries.
Prerequisites: ECON 100 or ECON 101 or by permission. 
Offered in alternate years. 

ENGL 114 War in Literature and Film (4 Credits)

Exploration of ways in which war is reflected in literature and film, including a variety of genres. Consideration of ethical issues is integral to the course. Extensive writing and active class discussion are required.

ENGL 119 World Literature (4 Credits)

Examines texts written in English and/or in translation from a variety of national traditions within a global context. Focus will vary with instructor, but may include novels (Beowulf, Things Fall Apart), films (Rashomon, Persepolis), poetry, and drama (The Peony Pavilion, The Swamp-Dwellers).

ENGL 215 Children’s Literature (3-4 Credits)

The stories we tell children can explain away fears or inculcate desired values or behaviors. Children’s stories also reveal how we define childhood (and adulthood). This course covers a range of literature from a variety of time periods and genres, analyzed from a variety of theoretical positions. 
Prerequisite: sophomore standing; one literature course recommended or by permission.

ENGL 217 Images of Women (3-4 Credits)

Focuses on representations of women and girls, and on the construction of gender in a variety of texts, and explores the critical significance of those representations. Primary texts (literature, film, and/or popular culture), historical periods, and critical approaches will vary depending on instructor.

ENGL 223 Shakespeare in Adaptation (4 Credits)

In this course, Shakespeare’s works will be paired with the imitations, spin-offs, adaptations, and parodies they have inspired. Questions of the choice and implications of adaptation will be addressed, as well as generic conventions and the relationship of literature, history, and politics. 
Prerequisite: sophomore standing or by permission.

ENGL 239 Chicana/o Literature (4 Credits)

Serves as an introduction to contemporary Chicana/o literature, emphasizing historical and cultural contexts. This class will focus on a body of work that emerges from the Chicana/o movement in the 1960s and continues to evolve as an expression of artistic and sociopolitical self-determination. 
Offered as needed.

ENGL 250 Theories of Popular Culture (4 Credits)

Why should we take popular culture seriously, and how do we read it critically? An introduction to the methods, issues, and theories developed and applied within the interdisciplinary field of Cultural Studies, including semiotics, structuralist and post-structuralist approaches, ideological analyses, as well as feminist and ethnic studies-based methods.
Offered as needed.

ENGL 256 Native American Literature (4 Credits)

Introduction to contemporary Native American literature. Covers a breadth of genres: essays, poetry, short fiction, and film. Historical, cultural, and political approaches will shape class discussions, and students will engage in extensive textual analysis. We will consider carefully the role of American Indian women writers in this evolving tradition. 
Offered as needed.

ENGL 317 Women’s Literature (3-4 Credits)

Focuses on literature written by women and why that particular focus matters to us as readers and critics. Students will engage in extensive textual analysis of both creative and critical texts. Historical periods, critical approaches, and national traditions will vary, depending on the instructor.
Recommended: ENGL 201 OR ENGL 202.

ENGL 322 The Eighteenth Century: Regicides, Libertines, Bluestockings, and Fops (4 Credits)

From 1660–1820, British culture was characterized by fear of invasion, scientific experiment, political debate, “shopping,” colonial expansion, and anxieties about how to control all of this novelty. Explores dynamic literary, philosophical, and cultural energies shaping the precursor of our modern world.
Recommended: ENGL 201 OR ENGL 202.

ENGL 325 Modernism (4 Credits)

Study of modernist writers from both sides of the Atlantic through topics such as the role of the “little magazine” and the visual arts, gender, the materiality of language, and more. Representative writers include Djuna Barnes, T.S. Eliot, D.H. Lawrence, James Joyce, Gertrude Stein, W. C. Williams, and Virginia Woolf. 
Recommended: ENGL 201 OR ENGL 202.
Offered as needed.

ENGL 333 Topics in African Diasporic Literatures (3-4 Credits)

This course allows students to extend their knowledge of African-American literature and to study in depth a topic related to African-diasporic literatures. The selection of topics will vary depending on the instructor, but may include questions of representation, transnationalism, sexuality, and the influences of critical theory. 
Prerequisite: ENGL 201 OR ENGL 202 recommended. 
Offered as needed.

ENGL 351 Postcolonial, Global, & Transnational Literatures (4 Credits)

Survey of critical and creative texts from nations that have experienced colonization by European empires, particularly Britain. Studies how national, cultural, and individual identities have been radically altered by this experience. Themes include identity, power, migration, race, gender, representation and resistance. Pays close attention to social, cultural and historical contexts. 
Prerequisite: ENGL 201 OR ENGL 202 recommended.

ENGL 362 Single-Author Seminar (3-4 Credits)

Studying a single author in depth, situating his or her works in the social, historical, and literary context. Authors include figures from any point in the Anglophone literary tradition, including Chaucer, Milton, Austen, Dickens, Melville, Joyce, Woolf, Faulkner, Williams, Merrill, Morrison, Rushdie, and many others. May be repeated for degree credit, given different topic, maximum 8 credits.
Prerequisite: ENGL 201 OR ENGL 202 recommended. 

ENGL 403 Contemporary Literary Criticism and Theory (4 Credits)

Exploration of representative schools of current literary theory. Topics may vary, but the course is a combination of theory with readings in fiction and poetry. 
Prerequisite: junior standing or by permission.

HIST 224 History of Sports in America (4 Credits)

Examines historical development and shifting meanings of American sports from the colonial era through the present. We focus on links between sports and national identity, industrialization, religion, and urbanization; and the issues of race, class, gender, and sexuality on and off the field. We may even get in a few games ourselves. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 229 U.S. History on Film (3-4 Credits)

Analyze history of U.S. film industry and society and explore the political, economic, social, and cultural meaning of film. Consider strengths and limits of film as a tool for understanding U.S. culture and history. Key themes: class; gender; and racial conflict and consciousness; and the rise of a mass consumer culture and American empire. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 324 Cold War America (4 Credits)

Explore how the Cold War has shaped U.S. (and global) economy, culture, politics, gender roles, media, and history. Topics include McCarthyism, nuclear politics, civil rights activism and backlash and Cold War literature.
Offered as needed.

HIST 326 Primary Witness in Women’s History (4 Credits)

Examination of four major kinds of primary documents used to reclaim and analyze United States women’s history: diaries, correspondence, oral narratives, and autobiographies. Focus on the problems posed by private and public evidence in historical scholarship. Students also apply these methods to their own writings and research. 
Prerequisite: HIST 290.
Offered as needed.

HIST 328 Gender, Media, and U.S. Culture (4 Credits)

Study of gender and media theory and history in modern United States. Major themes include the evolution of the mass media, how this media both reflects and shapes gender roles and norms, and how gender norms and stereotypes have evolved and have also shaped U.S. media.

PHIL 310 Philosophy of Sex and Gender (4 Credits)

Examination of conceptual and moral issues surrounding sexual equality: sexism and its relation to other forms of oppression; the notion of male and female natures; friendship, love, marriage, and the family; moral analyses of rape, abortion, and pornography. Classical and contemporary readings from philosophy, the social sciences, and political documents.
Prerequisite: one philosophy course or by permission.
Offered as needed.

PSYC 320 Psychology of Gender (4 Credits)

Survey of biological, psychological, and sociocultural issues relevant to the psychology of gender. Emphasis on cultural images of men, women, and children; gender differences and similarities; gender-role socialization; sexuality and reproduction; psychological adjustment; and interpersonal relations. 
Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or by permission.

PSYC 352 Human Sexuality (4 Credits)

This course consists of an overview of the field of human sexuality, including how we evaluate the claims of sexuality research. If psychology is the study of human behavior, a better understanding of our sexual psychology is important to understanding the factors that shape and motivate behavior. 
Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or by permission.

REL 131 American Religious History (4 Credits)

Exploration of religion in America from the pre-colonial era to the present. Emphases will vary, drawing from a variety of religious communities (including Puritan, Native American, Muslim, Buddhist, African American, Hindu, Evangelical, Catholic, and Neo-Pagan) and issues (such as civil rights, “cults,” church/state, gender, race, and ethnicity).

REL 199 Cults and Sects: the History of New Religious Movements in America (4 Credits)

Offers an introduction to the variety of new religious movements. Examines the multiple ways these communities have been understood and what those constructions tell us about religion and identity. 
Offered as needed.

REL 245 Queer Religiosities (4 Credits)

Lesbian/gay issues have sparked major controversies in Christianity and Judaism. Debates are emerging in Islam and other religions. Topics include: religious acceptance versus demands to change, sacred text interpretations, ordination, marriage/civil unions, parenting, hate crimes, sexuality education, political rights. Focus is on lesbian/gay approaches and responses.

REL 251 Women, Sexuality, and Western Religion (4 Credits)

Consideration of a range of women’s roles in Western religions. Examination of tension between women’s subordination and liberation in Christianity, Judaism, and Islam. Sources include Christian and Hebrew bibles, church fathers and mothers, new views of women’s history and feminist analysis of religion, and contemporary goddess spirituality. 
Offered in alternate years.

REL 255 Gender in Islam (4 Credits)

This course offers comprehensive analysis of the factors that shape perceptions of Islamic women. To better understand the dynamic role of women in Islamic tradition, students will explore gendered space, the mystical dimensions of female Sufis, media portrayals of Muslim women, and engage debates about veiling, circumcision, education, and Islamophobia.
Recommended: REL 125. 
Offered as needed. 
Numeric and Evaluation grade only. 

REL 265 The Prophet (4 Credits)

This course will provide a thorough and multifaceted examination of the Prophet of Islam, Muhammad. Students will examine the Prophet's historical life through multiple lenses from the classical period to modernity, and from the perspectives of communities that span the globe.
Recommended: REL 125 or REL 160.
Offered as needed. 
Credit/no credit only. 

REL 351 Women, Sexuality, and Buddhist Traditions (4 Credits)

Exploration of the diverse roles and representations of women in multiple Buddhist traditions, past and present. Special attention is given to the historical agency of Buddhist women in shaping Buddhist traditions and in creating possibilities for various forms of participation in these institutions throughout the Buddhist world. 
Offered in alternate years.

REST 231 Native American Women and Gender Issues (4 Credits)

This course examines the role of Native American women in traditional societies. It also investigates issues of concern in modern society for Native American women. The course further includes an exploration of gender issues in Native American Societies, including so-called two-spirit, or other gendered people. 
Offered in alternate years.

REST 232 Representing Race and Ethnicity in Film (4 Credits)

Explores the important role that dominant and alternative film practices have played in revealing, defining, and negotiating our understandings of race and ethnicity. 
Offered as needed.

REST 235 Hip Hop and Racial Politics (4 Credits)

This course will examine the race and gender politics of hip-hop, from its roots in U.S. cities and the black diaspora to its status as global popular culture today. We will explore how hip-hop redefines and reproduces our cultural understanding of race, gender, sexuality, and social class.
Offered as needed. 

REST 335 Race, Gender and Public Policy (4 Credits)

This class explores the connection between race, gender and public policy making in America, past and present. We will focus on specific case studies of welfare systems, foster care, housing or criminal justice systems, and explore race and gender inequalities. 
Offered in alternate years.

SOAN 205 Social Issues (4 Credits)

Examination of important contemporary social issues in the United States. Focus on the interrelationship of social structures, institutions, and individuals in the production and management of these issues, as well as their individual and social consequences. 
Offered as needed.

SOAN 230 Bodies and Society (4 Credits)

This course is an introduction to sociological thought about human bodies and their relationships to culture and society. We will place bodies at the center of our analysis, exploring their crucial sociocultural dimensions and critically examining the notion that the only disciplines fit to study bodies are biology and medicine.

SOAN 231 Gunning for Manhood (4 Credits)

This course explores gun culture and masculinity in the United States. It examines the social meaning of guns and how these meanings circulate, how guns have been linked to manhood and masculine identities, and how they facilitate the development of violent nationalisms.

SOAN 281 Middle East Women Speak: Perspectives through Film and Text (3-4 Credits)

Exploration of the lives of Middle East women through film and text. We will look at issues that they view as meaningful to their identity, culture, and shaping of their worlds. A variety of key questions will be raised in regards to gender, religion, family, politics, history, and social relations. 
Offered as needed.

SOAN 320 Self in Society (4 Credits)

Focus on the definition of the individual and the meaning of individuality in society. Concentration on the study of the “self” allows students to see how the individual is both created from, and a creator of, the social order. Language and basic processes of social interaction are explored. 
Prerequisite: SOAN 100 or SOAN 102, or by permission. 
Offered as needed.

SOAN 321 Gender and Emotion (4 Credits)

Explores how ideas of gender and ideas of emotions co-construct existing inequalities and stereotypes in society. Focus is on the social definitions, constraints, displays and uses of emotions and how these articulate gendered identities. 
Prerequisites: SOAN 100 or SOAN 102 and SOAN 320, or by permission.

SOAN 338 Children and Youth (4 Credits)

Examines childhood and youth as phases of social life actively constructed by young people and adults in context of structural inequalities of age, race, class, gender, and sexuality. Studies scholarly, popular cultural, and literary representations of the lives and experiences of children and youth. 
Prerequisites: SOAN 100, or SOAN 102, and one 200-level SOAN course, or by permission. 
Offered in alternate years.

SOAN 342 Gender and Sexuality (4 Credits)

Gender and sexuality in various cultural areas around the world, and consideration of the significance and implications of gender and sexuality in the social life of these people, while introducing current theoretical issues in the cross-cultural study of gender and sexuality.
Prerequisite: SOAN 100, or SOAN 102, or by permission. 
Offered as needed.

SOAN 345 Interrogating Masculinity (4 Credits)

Exploration of Western thought about masculinities. Examines the relationship between masculinities and femininities, power, class, race, disability, sexual orientation, and popular culture. Issues under consideration include the negotiation of gender and sexual identity, work/family conflicts, violence and dating.
Prerequisite: SOAN 100, or SOAN 102, one 200-level SOAN course, or by permission.

Negotiable Courses
Occasionally, additional courses and individualized studies from other departments also may be counted as Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies courses. Such a course would include significant attention to women’s and/or gender issues and/or issues associated with sexuality or sexual identity and offer the opportunity for focusing a research paper or project on such issues.

In a negotiable course, students must clarify with the instructor (at the beginning of the semester) their plans to have their work credited toward the major or minor. Students also should discuss their intentions to focus research papers or projects on Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies issues. Negotiable courses must be approved by the director of Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies for credit toward the WGS major or minor.

Course Descriptions (WGS)

WGS 145 Gender, Sexuality, and Power in Global Contexts (4 Credits)

This course introduces students to the discipline of Women’s and Gender Studies by providing an overview of prominent societal issues faced by women and others in marginalized identity groups. We will be primarily concerned with the complex interactions between gender and other social divisions such as race, class, ability, and sexual orientation.

WGS 150 Introduction to Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (4 Credits)

This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to introduce students to the interdisciplinary field of Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies by providing an overview of prominent societal issues faced by women and others in marginalized identity groups. We will be primarily concerned with the complex interactions between gender and other social divisions such as race, class, ability, and sexual orientation.

WGS 153 Queer Culture and Identity in the 20th Century (4 Credits)

The course features several distinct units, each of which will focus on a different part of the 20th-century gay experience. The course will address the historical development of the LGBTI identities as well as the future of distinctly queer sensibilities in an era typified by assimilation of LGBTI individuals into mainstream social structures such as marriage and parenthood.

WGS 165 Special Topics in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (2-4 Credits)

Topics of current interest in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. May be repeated for a maximum of 8-degree credits, given a different topic. 
Offered as needed.

WGS 265 Special Topics in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (2-4 Credits)

Topics of current interest in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. May be repeated for a maximum of 8-degree credits, given a different topic. 
Offered as needed.

WGS 365 Special Topics in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (2-4 Credits)

Topics of current interest in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. May be repeated for a maximum of 8-degree credits, given a different topic. 
Offered as needed.

WGS 220 Comparative Feminisms (4 Credits)

Focuses on feminisms from a transnational perspective, including indigenous feminisms, women's rights, and LGBT rights movements. Students will consider the relationship between grass roots activism and public policy and governmental change in transnational contexts. They will consider if a global movement for women's rights exists and if women's rights should be placed in the context of human rights.

WGS 230 Feminist Community Engagement (4 Credits)

Explores the connections between theory and practice with academic readings on activism and community building and student experiences as interns or community activists with non-profit organizations. Possible topics for projects are sexual violence, battering, poverty among women, self-defense, women and the law, reproductive rights, or women’s health issues. 
Offered in alternate years.

WGS 232 History of Sexuality in the United States (4 Credits)

Explores the understandings of sexuality from the colonial period to the present, charting both the development of sexuality as a concept and the explosion of discussion about it. Topics include prostitution, rape, birth control, abortion, courting rituals, sexual revolution, women’s liberation, sexual identity, and campaigns for lesbian and gay rights. 
Offered in alternate years.

WGS 234 History of Women in the United States: 19th Century (4 Credits)

Explores important historical factors that shaped gender roles and women's particular experiences in America during the nineteenth century. By placing women at the center of historical interpretation, this course examines how class, ethnicity and race influenced American women's economic, social and cultural contributions in the making of 19th century America.

WGS 235 History of Women in the United States: Twentieth Century (4 Credits)

Examines recent research on the private and public lives of women from 1880 to the present with attention to the differences among women of varied regional, racial, ethnic, and economic backgrounds. Covers significant themes in women’s history, including work inside and outside of the household, reform movements, immigration, sexuality, and feminism. 
Offered in alternate years.

WGS 236 Sex, Race, and Class in Popular Culture (4 Credits)

This class explores how films, music, and other forms of popular culture have represented gender, race, and class as they intersect with nationalism and sexualities, and how these representations consequently shape and influence our understanding of people in the real world. 
Offered as needed. 

WGS 240 Feminist and Social Justice Activism (4 Credits)

Students will begin the course focusing on the theoretical underpinnings of campus activism, including an analysis of initiatives with a feminist and social justice twist. With that background in place, students will put theory into practice by developing individual or group activist projects.

WGS 245 Mothers and Daughters in American Popular Culture (4 Credits)

Examines how the question of the representation of motherhood and the mother/daughter relationship is influenced by American popular culture since 1945. Analyzes how cultural concepts of motherhood and the mother/daughter bond reflect issues regarding ethnicity, class, sexuality, and generational differences. 
Offered as needed.

WGS 249 Women Filmmakers (4 Credits)

Focuses on the rich tradition of women directors who have made their marks on film history and audiences. Students will focus on the films of a number of prominent female directors from a range of historical time periods, cinema traditions, and national film industries.
Offered as needed.

WGS 253 I’m not a Feminist but...21st Century Women’s Movements (4 Credits)

Students will read broadly from the writings of the contemporary feminist movements, including "Third Wave Feminism," "Power Feminism," "Do-me Feminism," and "Third World/Transnational Feminism." They will also discuss the historical origins of these movements. Theoretical material, media (films and TV shows), and personal testimony of feminist action will be included. 
Offered as needed.

WGS 255 Sex, Lies, and Urban Life (4 Credits)

This course explores the historical and literary discourse associated with the cultural and socioeconomic aspects of urban migration and settlement for women to and within American cities. Examines how issues of sexuality, work, gender, inequality, domesticity, race and ethnicity shape the metropolitan experience of women in the United States. 
Offered as needed.

WGS 256 Women and Witchcraft in America (4 Credits)

Examines the significance of gender, class, sexuality, and ethnicity in the history of witchcraft in America, from the colonial period to the present. Studies how the constructions of gender and sexuality shape the history of witchcraft in America.

WGS 330 Feminist Research Methods (4 Credits)

Students learn how feminist scholars rethink analytic paradigms and create new theoretical models to guide their work. Examination of how knowledge is constructed and deployed, how interdisciplinary feminist perspectives inform research methods, what the practical implications are of those methods, and how feminist analysis redefines traditional categories and disciplinary concepts. 
Numeric grade only.
Prerequisite: sophomore status or above. 
Offered in alternate years. 

WGS 333 Pregnancy & Power: Reproductive Politics and Policies (4 Credits)

Women’s knowledge of their bodies, especially concerning sexuality and reproduction, is a primary issue for women’s well-being. This course focuses on current controversies over sexuality education, birth control, abortion, and related issues.

WGS 337 Working Sex: Interdisciplinary Studies (4 Credits)

We will examine feminist methodology and epistemology by closely examining one topic: sex work—the experiences of women with sex work and the political policies and cultural beliefs that shape those experiences. We will also look at the subject of sex work from multiple feminist methodological perspectives with a focus on how different authors utilize interdisciplinary methods to engage in feminist scholarship. 
Prerequisite: second-year status. 
Offered in alternate years.

WGS 340 Film Feminisms (4 Credits)

Introduction to theoretical frameworks developed around women, gender, feminism, and film studies, using both canonical and non-canonical films and using these films to discuss pressing issues in feminist and gender theory. You will also interrogate the role of the spectator in the production of meaning in film. 
Offered in alternate years.

WGS 341 Gender and Nation (4 Credits)

This course explores the ways gender informs our understanding of nationalism, and how nationalist discourses imagine and construct identities in specifically gendered, class, race, community, and caste terms in various locales. We will read a variety of different works by feminist scholars, political scientists, literary critics, and historians. 

WGS 359 Queer Theories (4 Credits)

This course focuses on a range of queer theories with an emphasis on intersecting marginalizations. Theoretical approaches draw links between disability, performativity and subjectivity; queer temporalities; urban space and gentrification; native, queer settler colonial, and neocolonial epistemologies; and transnational labor and migration.

WGS 427 Women in Collective Action (4 Credits)

Study of contemporary and historical examples of women affecting change in society. Examination of theories of social movements and change as applied to women’s efforts politically and culturally to transform the social order. Examples drawn from the United States and other countries. 
Prerequisite: WGS 150 or by permission. 
Offered as needed.

WGS 459 Senior Seminar (4 Credits)

Students synthesize and reflect on their interdisciplinary Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies learning. All students design and develop a research paper or project. Those who are Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies majors do so in consultation with their advisor and plan for a Directed Study to complete their paper or project in spring. 
Prerequisites: WGS 150, two 200-level courses (WGS or Cross-listed), one 300- or 400-level course (WGS or Cross-listed), and senior standing, or by permission.