Political Science

The Faculty
Graeme Auton
Eric McLaughlin
Arthur G. Svenson
Greg Thorson
Renee Van Vechten
Steven Wuhs

The Department of Political Science is committed to educating our majors to be effective analysts, practitioners and/or scholars. Our program of study builds on three elements: foundational understanding of how to conceive of and analyze political systems; curricular sequences determined by students’ interests within the field of political science; and an emphasis on the skills students need to succeed in life (e.g. effective argumentation, problem-solving, analytic, writing, and public speaking skills). The Political Science program also supports students’ initiatives to transfer the content and competencies they master in the curriculum into graduate studies in law, policy, and politics; into careers in advocacy, campaigns and elections, and foreign affairs; and into government and public service work.

The Major
The major in political science encompasses courses taken for foundational knowledge, breadth, and specialization. Majors must complete a minimum of 44 credits or the equivalent of 10 courses plus a 4-credit senior capstone.

Learning outcomes for this program may be found at www.redlands.edu/BA-POLI/learning-outcomes.

Bachelor of Arts 
The major in Political Science consists of 10 courses plus a 4-credit senior capstone for a minimum of 44 credits. Students must complete the following requirements:

Foundation (4 courses/16 credits)

Please note: students may take POLI 200 or POLI 202.

POLI 111 Introduction to American Politics (4 Credits)

Introduction to the dynamics of government and politics in the United States and analysis of major contemporary public policy problems.

POLI 123 Introduction to World Politics (4 Credits)

The principal problems facing the world community and its constituent states and nations, especially crisis areas. A basic introduction to international relations and/or comparative politics and a guide to fuller understanding of current events and conceptual issues.

POLI 150 Foundations of Political Theory (4 Credits)

Answers to questions such as “What is justice? (Or freedom? or equality?)” “Who is a good citizen and why?” ”What is a good state?”, and “What should my obligations be?” are debated continually, even as they shape much of the world we live in and share with others. This course introduces students to these core questions as developed by political theorists from antiquity to today, and challenges students to generate working answers to those questions.

POLI 200 The Study of Politics (4 Credits)

Overview of approaches to the study of politics. Students develop skills necessary to read, assess, and produce works of social science. Coursework involves analytic reviews of monographs and articles, production of literature reviews, and the development of an independent research proposal.

Elective Concentration (4 courses/16 credits)

Students must develop an elective concentration through one of two paths:
1. Independently Elected Concentration Students opting for this path select four courses in an area of their interest, at least one of which is a 400-level seminar.
2. Established Elective Concentrations Students opting for this path select four courses from one of the established concentrations below, at least one of which is a 400-level seminar.

Concentrations:

Law and Politics

POLI 306 Constitutional Law: National and State Powers (4 Credits)

Examination of governmental powers focusing primarily on the Supreme Court’s interpretation of constitutional language contained in Articles I, II, III, VI, and Amendment X; the relationships among legislative, executive, and judicial powers, as well as the nexus between national and state powers, are extensively explored. 
Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

POLI 307 Constitutional Law: Liberty and Authority (4 Credits)

Analysis of the Supreme Court’s interpretation of both substantive and procedural rights as they are outlined in the Bill of Rights and are applied to state governments. The ever-present tension between individual rights and social responsibility serves as the thematic framework. 
Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

POLI 318 American Political Thought and Practice (4 Credits)

Examination of both the distinctly American forms of political philosophy and theoretical approaches analyzing the practice of American politics. Readings include primary texts (particularly the founding), normative theory, and interpretive approaches. Topics may include the Constitution, equality, individualism, pluralism, pragmatism, race and gender in American politics, and citizenship.

POLI 345 International Law and Organization (4 Credits)

Various forms of the quest for world order, emphasizing issues of international law and the structure and functioning of intergovernmental organizations, including the United Nations. 
Prerequisite: POLI 123 or IR 200, or instructor permission.

POLI 363 Special Topics in Public Law (3-4 Credits)

Selected intermediate topics in public law chosen to reflect student interest and instructor availability. May be repeated for degree credit for a maximum of 8 credits given a different topic.

POLI 463 Advanced Seminar in Public Law (4 Credits)

Topics are announced in the Schedule of Classes. 
Prerequisite: POLI 306 or 307.

Governance and Policy

POLI 207 Environmental Politics and Policy (4 Credits)

Explores local, national and international contexts within which key decisions about the environment are made, emphasizing the U.S. experience. Focuses on the tensions between science and politics, health/safety and national security, and action and values. Develops theoretical and analytical tools to evaluate policy responses to major environmental episodes and controversies.

POLI 208 California Politics (3-4 Credits)

A three-part course. The first part focuses on the current political environment in California, learning who the representatives are and how the system works. The second portion centers on reflection upon the past, and in the last section, students study how California’s institutions have formed and evolved over the years.

POLI 250 American Foreign Policy (4 Credits)

How to analyze American foreign policy. Variables discussed include idiosyncrasy, roles, perception and misperception, political culture, interest groups, the media, public opinion, bureaucratic behavior and politics, decision making, multiple advocacy, the Congress, the international system, and international political economy.

POLI 304 Congress (4 Credits)

Role of Congress in the American political system, focuses on historical development; rules, procedures, structures; and legislative behavior. Questions how Congress works and why individual members of Congress function as they do. 
Prerequisite: POLI 111 or any American politics course.

POLI 354 Immigration Politics and Policy (4 Credits)

Explores the concept of citizenship and how it relates to immigration politics, human rights, public benefits, legal privileges, and civic duties; borders and security; statelessness and exclusion; and how wars, terrorism, globalization, climate change, and other phenomena affect immigration flows and policies in the U.S. and globally.
Prerequisites: POLI 111 or POLI 123.

POLI 456 Education Policy (4 Credits)

Examination of the history and evolution of federal and state education policy. Review of research conducted by leading scholars, think tanks, and non-partisan government organizations on the effectiveness of education policy.
Prerequisite: PLCY 100 or POI 111, and POLI 202. 
Offered in alternate years.

POLI 457 Health Care Policy (4 Credits)

Examination of the U.S. health care system, including the evolution and impact of Medicare, Medicaid, and the SCHIP programs. Comparison of effectiveness of the U.S. healthcare system with other systems around the world. Examination of recent attempts to reform the U.S. health care system and their likely impacts. 
Prerequisite: PLCY 100 or POLI 111, and POLI 202. 
Offered in alternate years.

PLCY 100 Introduction to Public Policy Analysis (4 Credits)

Introduction to both the theoretical foundations and processes of public policy-making. Case studies of educational policy, health care policy, economic policy, and/or tax policies. 

Parties, Campaigns, and Elections

POLI 220 European Politics and Development (4 Credits)

The organization, functioning, political behavior, and contemporary problems of major European governments and European intergovernmental regimes and organizations.

POLI 230 Latin American Politics and Development (4 Credits)

Introduction to the dynamics of politics in Latin America and contemporary issues of concern. Examination of political stability and recent trends toward democratization. Assessment of the success and/or failure of the different types of political systems in 20th-century Latin America, focusing on the role of landowners, the military, political parties, labor unions, and the church.
Offered as needed.

POLI 304 Congress (4 Credits)

Role of Congress in the American political system, focuses on historical development; rules, procedures, structures; and legislative behavior. Questions how Congress works and why individual members of Congress function as they do. 
Prerequisite: POLI 111 or any American politics course.

POLI 308 U.S. Presidency (4 Credits)

The operations of the modern presidency given the constraints and opportunities provided by the U.S. Constitution and other political, economic, and cultural factors. 
Prerequisite: Any American politics course.

POLI 321 Democratic Theory (4 Credits)

Examination of the historical development of, and current approaches to, the concept of democracy. Particular focus is given to contemporary debates about the meaning of participation, representation, deliberation, postmodernism, and the limitations of modern forms of democracy.
Offered in alternate years.

POLI 325 Comparative Parties and Elections (4 Credits)

Examination of how parties are formed, their functions as central actors in democratic and democratizing settings, and how they compete with one another. Comparative assessment of parties and what the implications of parties and party systems are for democracy and elections.

POLI 460 Advanced Seminar in American Politics (4 Credits)

Topics are announced in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated for degree credit, provided sections are in different topics. 
Prerequisite: an American politics course.

POLI 462 Advanced Seminar in Comparative Politics (4 Credits)

Topics are announced in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated for degree credit, provided sections are in different topics. 
Prerequisite: any Comparative Politics or International Relations course.

World Politics

POLI 220 European Politics and Development (4 Credits)

The organization, functioning, political behavior, and contemporary problems of major European governments and European intergovernmental regimes and organizations.

POLI 226 Middle East and African Politics (4 Credits)

A thematic introduction to the politics of the Middle East and Africa, in which students address themes and issues such as state formation, democracy and authoritarianism, political violence and terrorism, ethnicity and nationalism, gender and human rights, and the complex relationship between religion and politics. 
Offered in alternate years.

POLI 230 Latin American Politics and Development (4 Credits)

Introduction to the dynamics of politics in Latin America and contemporary issues of concern. Examination of political stability and recent trends toward democratization. Assessment of the success and/or failure of the different types of political systems in 20th-century Latin America, focusing on the role of landowners, the military, political parties, labor unions, and the church.
Offered as needed.

POLI 244 International Security (4 Credits)

A survey course on key issues of international security, including interstate and sub-state conflict, alliances, collective security, peacekeeping, preventive diplomacy, and both “traditional” and “non-traditional” threats. The course also focuses on regional security issues in Europe, the Middle East/Southwest Asia, and Northeast Asia. This course is required for students majoring in the International Politics, Peace and Security (IPPS) track of the International Relations major.

POLI 250 American Foreign Policy (4 Credits)

How to analyze American foreign policy. Variables discussed include idiosyncrasy, roles, perception and misperception, political culture, interest groups, the media, public opinion, bureaucratic behavior and politics, decision making, multiple advocacy, the Congress, the international system, and international political economy.

POLI 322 Political Change (4 Credits)

The 20th century saw dramatic processes of political restructuring—including revolutions, democratic breakthroughs, and authoritarian reversals. This course introduces and employs contemporary theoretical approaches to examine and compare these macro-level processes of political and economic change (including case studies from Latin America, Eastern and Western Europe, and sub-Saharan Africa).
Prerequisite: POLI 123.

POLI 325 Comparative Parties and Elections (4 Credits)

Examination of how parties are formed, their functions as central actors in democratic and democratizing settings, and how they compete with one another. Comparative assessment of parties and what the implications of parties and party systems are for democracy and elections.

POLI 337 Nations, Nationalism, and Conflict (4 Credits)

Investigation of the social and political connections between modernization and the emerging politics of ethnicity on a worldwide scale. Examination of several current examples of ethnic conflict and exploration of several theoretical approaches to race, ethnicity, nationality, and the modernization process. Review of various ethnic and anti-ethnic political movements in the United States and worldwide. 
Prerequisite: A Comparative Politics or International Relations course. 
Offered in alternate years.

POLI 345 International Law and Organization (4 Credits)

Various forms of the quest for world order, emphasizing issues of international law and the structure and functioning of intergovernmental organizations, including the United Nations. 
Prerequisite: POLI 123 or IR 200, or instructor permission.

POLI 346 Foreign Policies of Russia and the Former Soviet States (4 Credits)

The first part of the course is an overview of the Soviet Union’s foreign policy from 1917–1991. The second part is an examination of the international ramifications of the break-up of the Soviet Union and discusses the diverse foreign policy objectives (and circumstances) of the newly independent states of the former Soviet Union, concentrating on Russia. 
Prerequisites: A Comparative Politics and International Relations course.

POLI 462 Advanced Seminar in Comparative Politics (4 Credits)

Topics are announced in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated for degree credit, provided sections are in different topics. 
Prerequisite: any Comparative Politics or International Relations course.

POLI 464 Advanced Seminar in International Relations (4 Credits)

Topics are announced in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated for degree credit, provided sections are in different topics. 
Prerequisite: Any Comparative Politics or International Relations course.

IR 200 International Relations Theory (4 Credits)

Exploration of international relations theory, focusing on ideas and concepts that have been invoked to explain forces at work in interstate politics and the global system. Topics include political realist, liberal, constructivist, and feminist approaches to international relations theory, foreign policy, and national security decision making. Required of all International Relations majors.

Electives (2 courses/8 credits)

Students must enroll in two additional 4-credit courses, at least one of which is a 400-level seminar. Elective courses may support students’ curricular concentration.

Capstone

The senior capstone is offered as a 4-credit course to be taken in the fall of the senior year. Students must employ best practices in the discipline to complete an independent research project; a student who does not successfully complete this project will not graduate with a major in Political Science.

POLI 495 Political Science Capstone (4 Credits)

Four-credit guided research seminar for graduating seniors. Students will produce and present individual research projects with a common theme. Work must reflect best practices and mastery of the Department's learning outcomes required for major; students must pass to graduate.

The Minor
A minor in Political Science consists of a minimum of 24 credits in the department. At least 12 credits must be taken at the University of Redlands.

Other Courses
With prior approval of their academic advisors and the Political Science Department chair, students may count three upper-division courses offered by other departments, off-campus coursework (such as through foreign study programs or a Washington Semester), internships, and individualized study courses for up to 12 credits of elective credit toward the major or minor.

Advanced Placement in Political Science 
Students receiving scores of four or above on an AP (Advanced Placement) United States Government and Politics Examination will be given credit for POLI 111. Students receiving scores of four or above on an AP Comparative Government and Politics examination will be given credit for POLI 123.

Departmental Honors
Only students with a GPA of 3.5 or higher in the major are eligible for honors. Eligible students may earn honors in one of two ways:
1. Thesis: Students who wish to write a thesis must submit a proposal to the department; upon approval, a committee will be assigned and a writing schedule prepared. If at any point the committee determines the student is not progressing adequately, thesis approval may be revoked. Honors are awarded at the discretion of the thesis committee.

2. Portfolio: Students may generate a portfolio including three significant research papers from previous classes, inclusive of revisions, and summative and reflective essays to demonstrate mastery of the department's learning outcomes. If the department determines a portfolio demonstrates outstanding merit, the student will be invited to submit to an oral examination of their mastery of the Political Science major. Excellent performance in this exam merits honors.

Related Programs
Political Science students who are interested in the pre-law program or the International Relations or Public Policy major should consult the appropriate sections in this Catalog.

Elective: Directed Study (2–4)
Students can choose between the following Directed Study courses: POLI 270, POLI 370, POLI 470, or POLI 499. 

Elective: Internship (2–4)
Students can choose between the following Internship courses: POLI 280, POLI 380, POLI 480, or POLI 485.

Course Descriptions (POLI)

POLI 111 Introduction to American Politics (4 Credits)

Introduction to the dynamics of government and politics in the United States and analysis of major contemporary public policy problems.

POLI 123 Introduction to World Politics (4 Credits)

The principal problems facing the world community and its constituent states and nations, especially crisis areas. A basic introduction to international relations and/or comparative politics and a guide to fuller understanding of current events and conceptual issues.

POLI 150 Foundations of Political Theory (4 Credits)

Answers to questions such as “What is justice? (Or freedom? or equality?)” “Who is a good citizen and why?” ”What is a good state?”, and “What should my obligations be?” are debated continually, even as they shape much of the world we live in and share with others. This course introduces students to these core questions as developed by political theorists from antiquity to today, and challenges students to generate working answers to those questions.

POLI 200 The Study of Politics (4 Credits)

Overview of approaches to the study of politics. Students develop skills necessary to read, assess, and produce works of social science. Coursework involves analytic reviews of monographs and articles, production of literature reviews, and the development of an independent research proposal.

POLI 202 Statistical Analysis and Mapping of Social Science Data (4 Credits)

Principles of hypothesis development and testing, strategies for making controlled comparisons, principles of statistical inference, and tests of statistical significance. Development and testing of important research questions using such prominent data sets as the General Social Survey and the National Election Series.

POLI 203 Playing Politics (3 Credits)

An experiential learning course in which students learn about the politics of social dilemmas, social choice theory, and elementary game theory through playing competitive games throughout May Term. Each game models a particular social problem found in real-world politics.

POLI 206 State and Local Politics and Policy (4 Credits)

This course examines the variation in political institutions across the U.S. states as well as current political issues that confront state and local governments and their policy responses to pressing issues. Intergovernmental relations are also examined from national and subnational perspectives. Particular attention is paid to California and the Inland Empire.

POLI 207 Environmental Politics and Policy (4 Credits)

Explores local, national and international contexts within which key decisions about the environment are made, emphasizing the U.S. experience. Focuses on the tensions between science and politics, health/safety and national security, and action and values. Develops theoretical and analytical tools to evaluate policy responses to major environmental episodes and controversies.

POLI 208 California Politics (3-4 Credits)

A three-part course. The first part focuses on the current political environment in California, learning who the representatives are and how the system works. The second portion centers on reflection upon the past, and in the last section, students study how California’s institutions have formed and evolved over the years.

POLI 211 Politics of Race and Ethnicity in America (4 Credits)

An introduction to the study of identity politics in America, including race, ethnicity, gender, class, and the intersectionality among these factors. Topics include the history of Latino and Black civil rights movements, the legacy of colonialism, key judicial decisions and legislation, and contemporary political issues facing people of color.

POLI 212 Classical Political Thought (4 Credits)

Intensive reading of the political texts forming the foundation of the Western tradition of political philosophy. Emphasis on ancient Greek thought, particularly Plato, Aristotle, and Sophocles, with some survey of Roman, medieval, and/or Confucian political thought.

POLI 214 Modern Political Thought (4 Credits)

Origin, defense, and criticism of capitalistic democracy and political liberalism. Original works of such theorists as Hobbes, Locke, Madison, Rousseau, Mill, Marx, and Lenin.

POLI 220 European Politics and Development (4 Credits)

The organization, functioning, political behavior, and contemporary problems of major European governments and European intergovernmental regimes and organizations.

POLI 226 Middle East and African Politics (4 Credits)

A thematic introduction to the politics of the Middle East and Africa, in which students address themes and issues such as state formation, democracy and authoritarianism, political violence and terrorism, ethnicity and nationalism, gender and human rights, and the complex relationship between religion and politics. 
Offered in alternate years.

POLI 227 Political Geography (3 Credits)

Exploration of the relationship between space, place, and politics in comparative American politics. Particular emphasis on the development of electoral politics at the state and local levels, with a collaborative, community-based component.

POLI 230 Latin American Politics and Development (4 Credits)

Introduction to the dynamics of politics in Latin America and contemporary issues of concern. Examination of political stability and recent trends toward democratization. Assessment of the success and/or failure of the different types of political systems in 20th-century Latin America, focusing on the role of landowners, the military, political parties, labor unions, and the church.
Offered as needed.

POLI 244 International Security (4 Credits)

A survey course on key issues of international security, including interstate and sub-state conflict, alliances, collective security, peacekeeping, preventive diplomacy, and both “traditional” and “non-traditional” threats. The course also focuses on regional security issues in Europe, the Middle East/Southwest Asia, and Northeast Asia. This course is required for students majoring in the International Politics, Peace and Security (IPPS) track of the International Relations major.

POLI 250 American Foreign Policy (4 Credits)

How to analyze American foreign policy. Variables discussed include idiosyncrasy, roles, perception and misperception, political culture, interest groups, the media, public opinion, bureaucratic behavior and politics, decision making, multiple advocacy, the Congress, the international system, and international political economy.

POLI 257 Policy Making in Washington, DC (3 Credits)

Students spend the term in Washington DC meeting with alumni active in national politics. Half the term is devoted to domestic policy and half to foreign policy. 
Prerequisite: by permission of instructor. 
Credit/no credit only.

POLI 300 Advanced Quantitative Methods in the Social Sciences (4 Credits)

Examination of the most commonly used advanced statistical techniques used in the social sciences. Topics may include Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) regression, Logit/Probit, and/ or other advanced methods. 
Prerequisite: POLI 202 or MATH 111.

POLI 304 Congress (4 Credits)

Role of Congress in the American political system, focuses on historical development; rules, procedures, structures; and legislative behavior. Questions how Congress works and why individual members of Congress function as they do. 
Prerequisite: POLI 111 or any American politics course.

POLI 306 Constitutional Law: National and State Powers (4 Credits)

Examination of governmental powers focusing primarily on the Supreme Court’s interpretation of constitutional language contained in Articles I, II, III, VI, and Amendment X; the relationships among legislative, executive, and judicial powers, as well as the nexus between national and state powers, are extensively explored. 
Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

POLI 307 Constitutional Law: Liberty and Authority (4 Credits)

Analysis of the Supreme Court’s interpretation of both substantive and procedural rights as they are outlined in the Bill of Rights and are applied to state governments. The ever-present tension between individual rights and social responsibility serves as the thematic framework. 
Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

POLI 308 U.S. Presidency (4 Credits)

The operations of the modern presidency given the constraints and opportunities provided by the U.S. Constitution and other political, economic, and cultural factors. 
Prerequisite: Any American politics course.

POLI 317 Feminist Political Theory (4 Credits)

Survey of the philosophical/theoretical approaches taking gender as central to the analysis, investigation, and explication of politics and political phenomena. Topics may include the social construction of gender, power, and identity; oppression and liberation; feminist legal theory; women and democracy; gender and race; etc. 
Offered in alternate years.

POLI 318 American Political Thought and Practice (4 Credits)

Examination of both the distinctly American forms of political philosophy and theoretical approaches analyzing the practice of American politics. Readings include primary texts (particularly the founding), normative theory, and interpretive approaches. Topics may include the Constitution, equality, individualism, pluralism, pragmatism, race and gender in American politics, and citizenship.

POLI 319 Contemporary Political Theory (4 Credits)

Survey of the major ideas and approaches to political theory developed since 1900. Texts and themes vary, but may include modern liberalism, political identity (theories of race, gender, ethnicity), morality, nihilism, justice and distribution, power, postmodernism, cultural studies, mass society, and/or ethics. May be repeated for degree credit.  
Offered as needed.

POLI 321 Democratic Theory (4 Credits)

Examination of the historical development of, and current approaches to, the concept of democracy. Particular focus is given to contemporary debates about the meaning of participation, representation, deliberation, postmodernism, and the limitations of modern forms of democracy.
Offered in alternate years.

POLI 322 Political Change (4 Credits)

The 20th century saw dramatic processes of political restructuring—including revolutions, democratic breakthroughs, and authoritarian reversals. This course introduces and employs contemporary theoretical approaches to examine and compare these macro-level processes of political and economic change (including case studies from Latin America, Eastern and Western Europe, and sub-Saharan Africa).
Prerequisite: POLI 123.

POLI 325 Comparative Parties and Elections (4 Credits)

Examination of how parties are formed, their functions as central actors in democratic and democratizing settings, and how they compete with one another. Comparative assessment of parties and what the implications of parties and party systems are for democracy and elections.

POLI 332 Politics of Japan and Korea (4 Credits)

An introduction to the political systems of Japan, South Korea and North Korea. Topics include political institutions, party systems, electoral politics of Japan and South Korea, social policy, political economy, foreign policy, and the broader role of all three countries in East Asian regionalism. 
Prerequisite: A Comparative Politics or International Relations course.

POLI 337 Nations, Nationalism, and Conflict (4 Credits)

Investigation of the social and political connections between modernization and the emerging politics of ethnicity on a worldwide scale. Examination of several current examples of ethnic conflict and exploration of several theoretical approaches to race, ethnicity, nationality, and the modernization process. Review of various ethnic and anti-ethnic political movements in the United States and worldwide. 
Prerequisite: A Comparative Politics or International Relations course. 
Offered in alternate years.

POLI 345 International Law and Organization (4 Credits)

Various forms of the quest for world order, emphasizing issues of international law and the structure and functioning of intergovernmental organizations, including the United Nations. 
Prerequisite: POLI 123 or IR 200, or instructor permission.

POLI 346 Foreign Policies of Russia and the Former Soviet States (4 Credits)

The first part of the course is an overview of the Soviet Union’s foreign policy from 1917–1991. The second part is an examination of the international ramifications of the break-up of the Soviet Union and discusses the diverse foreign policy objectives (and circumstances) of the newly independent states of the former Soviet Union, concentrating on Russia. 
Prerequisites: A Comparative Politics and International Relations course.

POLI 354 Immigration Politics and Policy (4 Credits)

Explores the concept of citizenship and how it relates to immigration politics, human rights, public benefits, legal privileges, and civic duties; borders and security; statelessness and exclusion; and how wars, terrorism, globalization, climate change, and other phenomena affect immigration flows and policies in the U.S. and globally.
Prerequisites: POLI 111 or POLI 123.

POLI 361 Special Topics in Political Theory (3-4 Credits)

Selected intermediate topics in political theory chosen to reflect student interest and instructor availability. May be repeated for degree credit for a maximum of 8 credits given a different topic. 
Offered as needed.

POLI 362 Special Topics in Comparative Politics (3-4 Credits)

Selected intermediate topics in comparative government chosen to reflect student interest and instructor availability. May be repeated for degree credit for a maximum of 8 credits given a different topic. 
Prerequisites: A Comparative Politics and International Relations course.
Offered as needed.

POLI 363 Special Topics in Public Law (3-4 Credits)

Selected intermediate topics in public law chosen to reflect student interest and instructor availability. May be repeated for degree credit for a maximum of 8 credits given a different topic.

POLI 364 Special Topics in International Relations (4 Credits)

Selected intermediate topics in international relations chosen to reflect student interest and instructor availability. May be repeated for degree credit for a maximum of 8 credits given a different topic. 
Prerequisites: A Comparative Politics and International Relations course.
Offered as needed.

POLI 365 Special Topics in Political Science (3-4 Credits)

Selected intermediate topics in government that do not fit one of the established sub-field topic courses. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits given a different topic.

POLI 456 Education Policy (4 Credits)

Examination of the history and evolution of federal and state education policy. Review of research conducted by leading scholars, think tanks, and non-partisan government organizations on the effectiveness of education policy.
Prerequisite: PLCY 100 or POI 111, and POLI 202. 
Offered in alternate years.

POLI 457 Health Care Policy (4 Credits)

Examination of the U.S. health care system, including the evolution and impact of Medicare, Medicaid, and the SCHIP programs. Comparison of effectiveness of the U.S. healthcare system with other systems around the world. Examination of recent attempts to reform the U.S. health care system and their likely impacts. 
Prerequisite: PLCY 100 or POLI 111, and POLI 202. 
Offered in alternate years.

POLI 460 Advanced Seminar in American Politics (4 Credits)

Topics are announced in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated for degree credit, provided sections are in different topics. 
Prerequisite: an American politics course.

POLI 461 Advanced Seminar in Political Theory (4 Credits)

Topics are announced in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated for degree credit, provided sections are in different topics.
Prerequisite: any Political Theory or Constitutional Law course.

POLI 462 Advanced Seminar in Comparative Politics (4 Credits)

Topics are announced in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated for degree credit, provided sections are in different topics. 
Prerequisite: any Comparative Politics or International Relations course.

POLI 463 Advanced Seminar in Public Law (4 Credits)

Topics are announced in the Schedule of Classes. 
Prerequisite: POLI 306 or 307.

POLI 464 Advanced Seminar in International Relations (4 Credits)

Topics are announced in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated for degree credit, provided sections are in different topics. 
Prerequisite: Any Comparative Politics or International Relations course.

POLI 485 Specialized Internship in Law (2-4 Credits)

A work-related experience, usually with a local law firm, that serves to enrich understanding of the law.

POLI 495 Political Science Capstone (4 Credits)

Four-credit guided research seminar for graduating seniors. Students will produce and present individual research projects with a common theme. Work must reflect best practices and mastery of the Department's learning outcomes required for major; students must pass to graduate.

International Relations Course (IR)

IR 200 International Relations Theory (4 Credits)

Exploration of international relations theory, focusing on ideas and concepts that have been invoked to explain forces at work in interstate politics and the global system. Topics include political realist, liberal, constructivist, and feminist approaches to international relations theory, foreign policy, and national security decision making. Required of all International Relations majors.

Public Policy (PLCY)

PLCY 100 Introduction to Public Policy Analysis (4 Credits)

Introduction to both the theoretical foundations and processes of public policy-making. Case studies of educational policy, health care policy, economic policy, and/or tax policies.