Liberal Studies 

The Program Director 
Katherine Hickey, Music

The Faculty Committee
Janet Beery, Mathematics
John Glover, History
Heather King, English
Jose Lalas, School of Education
Francisco Silva, Psychology
Debra Van Engelen, Chemistry

The Major
Liberal Studies (LBST) is an interdisciplinary program composed of a double major for students interested in earning a Single Subject Teaching Credential or a Multiple Subject Teaching Credential for teaching grades K–8. The Liberal Studies core consists of a sequence of LBST courses that introduce prospective teachers to the field, expose them to philosophical and theoretical foundations of education from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, and prepare them to propose and implement research projects in education. Subject-matter coursework in the Liberal Studies degree is designed to achieve the subject matter breadth that is required to teach at the K-8 level. Completion of subject matter courses in seven content areas satisfies some of the Liberal Arts Inquiry Requirements for graduation from the University of Redlands. The courses prepare students for the multiple subjects test in the California Subject Examination for Teachers (CSET; formerly MSAT or Multiple Subject Assessment for Teachers) required under federal and state mandates.

Second Major Requirement 
The Liberal Studies degree requires a second major of the student’s choosing for disciplinary depth. Interdisciplinary majors are also available to the student. By selecting and completing a second major, Liberal Studies majors develop a strong understanding of the conceptual foundations of at least one subject area in depth, as well as an understanding of how knowledge is created and organized in that subject. Students are encouraged to select a subject area that will provide the foundation for supplementing a Multiple Subject Teaching Credential with teaching a Single Subject at the secondary level or one that will lead to a second profession or graduate study. Common second majors include Biology, Chemistry, Communication Sciences and Disorders, English Literature, Environmental Science, History, Mathematics, Psychology, and Spanish.

Students may enter the School of Education to begin credential coursework while completing a B.A. in Liberal Studies. All current course prerequisites for admission to the teaching credential program in the University’s School of Education are satisfied within the Liberal Studies major. Academic advising for undergraduate students interested in becoming LBST majors is coordinated through the Liberal Studies program in the College of Arts and Sciences. Students who plan to be teachers should seek early advising by the Liberal Studies Program, followed by consultation with the School of Education.

Learning outcomes for this program may be found at www.redlands.edu/BA-LBST/learning-outcomes.

Bachelor of Arts 

Requirements 
All Liberal Studies core courses and the subject matter courses must be at least 3 credits and must be completed with a grade of 2.0 or higher. Students with recommended placement in advanced courses in any discipline are encouraged to enroll accordingly. All course substitutions or equivalences for major courses must be approved by the Liberal Studies program director; students should contact the Liberal Studies Program office regarding suitability of specific courses in each subject area.

Liberal Studies Core Courses (4 courses/16 credits)

LBST 101 Introduction to Education (4 Credits)

An introduction to the many aspects of the teaching profession, this course will prepare students to integrate the different subject matters of the Liberal Studies curriculum into a developing personal philosophy and practice of education. Includes an introduction to classroom observation and fieldwork. Numeric grade only.

LBST 201 Studies in Education (4 Credits)

An introduction to research, educational philosophy and practice as it relates to specific subject-matter areas. This course allows students the opportunity to relate their own educational experiences and knowledge of disciplinary subject matter to their developing philosophy of education. Topics of focus may vary. Community service component included.
Prerequisite: LBST 101 or by permission of department chair.

LBST 301 Inquiry and Analysis in Education (4 Credits)

Research enables educators to improve teaching, to measure teaching effectiveness, and to determine how schools are funded and administered. Students are introduced to research techniques and develop proposals for educational research. Topics of focus may vary. 
Prerequisite: LBST 201 or by permission.

LBST 401 Senior Seminar in Education (4 Credits)

Students conduct research in education under the guidance of experts in the discipline and complete their portfolios. Students will gain knowledge of the professional research process and put that knowledge into practice. Students will be encouraged to consult professionals in the field of their research, providing valuable career contacts.
Prerequisite: LBST 301 or by permission.

Subject Matter Courses
The following courses are required Subject Matter courses for the Liberal Studies degree. The courses are the most appropriate choices for fulfilling the respective LAI or LAF relative to the state’s teaching content standards.

7 courses/26-27 credits

Please note: the MATH 102 prerequisite is MATH 101 Finite Mathematics. Any 200-level English course can also be taken. Course substitution must be approved by the Liberal Studies Director.

EDUG 310 Introduction to Second Language Acquisition (3 Credits)

For teachers and prospective teachers seeking a teaching credential. Theories and research on language learning, language structure and use of theories and factors in first- and second-language development are studied. Examination of effective teaching strategies that empower teachers while teaching second language learners.

HIST 122 American History since 1877 (4 Credits)

This survey explores major themes in the development of American culture, economy, and politics from the Civil War and its aftermath to the present. Topics include the rise of American empire; industrialization; urbanization and suburbanization; war; political and social reform and activism; mass culture and mass media; and the study of class, race, gender, and sexuality.

ENGL 215 Children’s Literature (3-4 Credits)

The stories we tell children can explain away fears or inculcate desired values or behaviors. Children’s stories also reveal how we define childhood (and adulthood). This course covers a range of literature from a variety of time periods and genres, analyzed from a variety of theoretical positions. 
Prerequisite: sophomore standing; one literature course recommended or by permission.

MUS 118 Teaching Music in the Classroom (4 Credits)

Introduction to teaching music in the pre–K to 6th-grade classroom. Course emphasizes age-appropriate, quality music materials and teaching strategies. Students will further develop their own music literacy skills. Course is designed for music minors and Liberal Studies majors seeking a multiple subject credential. 
Numeric grade only.

MATH 102 Explorations in Mathematics for Prospective Educators (4 Credits)

Topics include structure of mathematical systems, elementary number theory, operations in the real number system, and elementary problem-solving. Review of arithmetic, algebraic, and geometric topics to reinforce existing knowledge. Introduction to methods and tools currently recommended for use by K–8 educators. An 80-minute lab experience is required weekly. Not recommended for first-year students.
Prerequisite: MATH 101 and LBST 101. 

BIOL 107 Concepts of Biology (3-4 Credits)

Exploration of various concepts selected from evolution, ecology, genetics, physiology, morphology, development, and behavior. Four hours lecture and laboratory.

CHEM 102 Introduction to Chemistry of the Environment (4 Credits)

Introductory course for students wishing to explore the sciences or needing preparation for General Chemistry. Topics in chemistry relevant to the environment such as energy needs, pollution, and pesticides will be discussed. Three hours lecture. No background in chemistry is required. Recommended for non-science majors. 
Numeric grade only.

Additional Recommended Courses

Please note: POLI 111 meets California Constitution requirement. HIST 101, 102, or 121 may be taken. Foreign language course is to be chosen by student

EDUG 331 Child Development (3 Credits)

Cognitive, social, and language development of children from birth through adolescence; various learning theories and their implications for the timing of instruction; and developmental implications for teaching the whole child.

EVST 220 Physical Geography (4 Credits)

Exploration of the physical geography of Earth by examination of lithospheric, atmospheric, hydrological, and biological processes. Laboratory includes field methods, topographic map reading, and in-depth discussion of these principles. 
Prerequisite: EVST 100 or by permission.

PHYS 103 General Astronomy (4 Credits)

Introductory study of astronomy designed to acquaint the student with stars, black holes, galaxies, and the origin and present state of the universe. Students will learn about these concepts in the context of the scientific method. Laboratory is one day a week with occasional evening observing sessions. Includes lecture and laboratory components.
Prerequisite: Expects competency in high school algebra, geometry, and trigonometry.
Offered as needed.

POLI 111 Introduction to American Politics (4 Credits)

Introduction to the dynamics of government and politics in the United States and analysis of major contemporary public policy problems.

HIST 101 World History to 1450 (4 Credits)

Introductory survey of the principal world civilizations of the ancient, classical, and medieval eras, with emphasis on the major features and patterns of change of each civilization in a comparative framework, and cross-cultural interactions and exchanges. Also considered are non-traditional approaches to history, such as the feminist perspective.

HIST 102 World History since 1450 (4 Credits)

Introduction to the chief themes or issues shaping world history from the European age of discovery through the end of the Cold War. Unavoidably selective, the course focuses upon the forces of modernization and change revolutionizing traditional world cultures and resulting in the interdependent, global system of today.

HIST 121 American History to 1877 (4 Credits)

This survey explores major themes in the development of American culture, economy, and politics from First Contact through Reconstruction. Topics include colonial encounters, the Revolutionary War, the rise of participatory democracy, slavery and the creation of race, the “Market Revolution,” geographic expansion, and the Civil War and its aftermath.

PE 310 Instructional Strategies for Physical Education (4 Credits)

Teaching strategies, techniques, and evaluation procedures in the field of physical education. Discussion focuses on lesson planning, unit planning, and class organization. Students then implement planning skills in a physical education setting.

PHIL 100 Introduction to Philosophy (4 Credits)

Introduction to substantive issues in philosophy through examination of historical and contemporary sources. Designed to provide a survey of topics in various areas, including ethics, metaphysics, and epistemology.

PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology (4 Credits)

Survey of classic and contemporary theory and research in human and animal behavior. Topics include the biopsychological bases of behavior, learning, cognition, motivation, developmental and social processes, and psychological disorders and their treatment.

REL 125 Introduction to World Religions (4 Credits)

By studying major religious traditions of the world, students will consider how religious traditions guide the way people live their lives in an ever increasingly diverse and religiously pluralistic world. Investigations will include both historical studies and the writings of religious traditions.

SPCH 110 Fundamentals of Speech (4 Credits)

Principles of public speaking and interpretation with classroom evaluation of speeches. Designed to enhance the student’s skills in persuasive or informative speaking.

THA 140 Acting Fundamentals (4 Credits)

Intensive training of the student’s unique expressive abilities. Focus on training the actor’s instrument: the body, voice, and creative imagination. Through structured ensemble and solo work, students develop the basic tools of performance: concentration, relaxation, intention, physicalization, and moment-to-moment play. May be repeated for degree credit for a maximum of 8 credits.

Second Major 
The course of study is subject to the guidelines set forth by the program in which the second major is taken. The second major must be declared before registration for the junior year.

Departmental Honors
A departmental honors program in Liberal Studies is available for those students who wish to pursue advanced undergraduate research in education. Students must have a cumulative University of Redlands GPA of at least 3.6 to apply to the program. Successful completion of LBST 301 or its equivalent is also a prerequisite to apply to the program. University guidelines for Honors Projects apply to all projects. Applicants are encouraged to submit a thesis proposal to the program director by the end of the Spring semester of their junior year. The deadline to apply for the honors program is October 15 in the fall semester of the senior year. The final draft of the Senior Honors Project must be presented to the Honors committee by the end of February; award forms signed by the committee must be in the Registrar’s Office no later than one month prior to graduation. The project includes an oral defense of the Honors Project in early March; final written project must be completed by mid-March. 

Course Descriptions (LBST)

LBST 101 Introduction to Education (4 Credits)

An introduction to the many aspects of the teaching profession, this course will prepare students to integrate the different subject matters of the Liberal Studies curriculum into a developing personal philosophy and practice of education. Includes an introduction to classroom observation and fieldwork. Numeric grade only.

LBST 170 Directed Study (2-4 Credits)

This individualized study option provides majors with opportunities to design their own courses and to work closely with faculty on a one-on-one basis. The directed study may be disciplinary, interdisciplinary, or from areas outside the current liberal studies curriculum. 
Credit/no credit grade only.

LBST 270 Directed Study (2-4 Credits)

This individualized study option provides majors with opportunities to design their own courses and to work closely with faculty on a one-on-one basis. The directed study may be disciplinary, interdisciplinary, or from areas outside the current liberal studies curriculum. 
Credit/no credit grade only.

LBST 201 Studies in Education (4 Credits)

An introduction to research, educational philosophy and practice as it relates to specific subject-matter areas. This course allows students the opportunity to relate their own educational experiences and knowledge of disciplinary subject matter to their developing philosophy of education. Topics of focus may vary. Community service component included.
Prerequisite: LBST 101 or by permission of department chair.

LBST 301 Inquiry and Analysis in Education (4 Credits)

Research enables educators to improve teaching, to measure teaching effectiveness, and to determine how schools are funded and administered. Students are introduced to research techniques and develop proposals for educational research. Topics of focus may vary. 
Prerequisite: LBST 201 or by permission.

LBST 370 Advanced Directed Study (2-4 Credits)

This individualized study option provides majors with opportunities to design their own courses and to work closely with faculty on a one-on-one basis. The directed study may be disciplinary, interdisciplinary, or from areas outside the current liberal studies curriculum. 
Credit/ no credit grade only.

LBST 470 Advanced Directed Study (2-4 Credits)

This individualized study option provides majors with opportunities to design their own courses and to work closely with faculty on a one-on-one basis. The directed study may be disciplinary, interdisciplinary, or from areas outside the current liberal studies curriculum. 
Credit/ no credit grade only.

LBST 401 Senior Seminar in Education (4 Credits)

Students conduct research in education under the guidance of experts in the discipline and complete their portfolios. Students will gain knowledge of the professional research process and put that knowledge into practice. Students will be encouraged to consult professionals in the field of their research, providing valuable career contacts.
Prerequisite: LBST 301 or by permission.