Race and Ethnic Studies

The Director 
Keith Osajima

The Faculty
Lawrence W. Gross
Jennifer Tilton

The Advisory Committee
Susan B. Goldstein, Psychology
Priya Jha, English
Sheila Lloyd, English
John Walsh, Religious Studies

The Major
The major consists of 48 credits. Race and Ethnic Studies is an interdisciplinary and multi-disciplinary field of study. Requirements for the major are met through Race and Ethnic Studies (REST) courses, cross-listed, concentration, and negotiable courses in other departments and programs. The major includes a foundation of core courses, a flexible area of emphasis where students pursue depth and concentration of knowledge in an area of their choice, breadth courses, and a capstone experience to integrate their studies.

Learning outcomes for this program may be found at www.redlands.edu/BA-REST/learning-outcomes.

Bachelor of Arts

Core Requirements (2 courses/8 credits)

REST 120 Introduction to Race and Ethnic Studies (4 Credits)

Examination of the historical and contemporary experiences of racial and ethnic groups in the United States. Topics include dimensions of racism and discrimination in American society, the interrelated experiences of racial groups, community-building and cultural development, and movements for social change.

REST 351 Race Theory (4 Credits)

Examination of theoretical perspectives on race and racism. Through close readings of texts and seminar discussion, students will develop comparative analytic skills needed to chart the theoretical contours of the field. Topics may include the social construction of race, globalization and race, and intersections of race, class, and gender.
Prerequisite: REST 120 or by permission.

Area of Emphasis (5 courses minimum/20 credits)
Majors must construct, in consultation with faculty and the director, an area of emphasis designed to develop depth and concentration of knowledge. Must include at least one REST methods course or other methods course appropriate to the area of emphasis.

All areas of emphasis and their course lists must be approved by the director.

Breadth Courses (4 courses minimum/16 credits)
Majors, in consultation with faculty and the director, must take four courses selected to complement the area of emphasis.

Capstone Courses (2 courses/4-6 credits)

REST 401 Senior Capstone I: Project Design (2 Credits)

The first of a two-semester capstone experience for REST majors. Designed to help students build upon, integrate, and extend previous REST work through the design and development of a proposal for a capstone project.
Prerequisite: REST 120 or by permission.
Offered as needed.

REST 402 Senior Capstone II: Project Implementation (2-4 Credits)

The second of a two-semester capstone experience. During this semester, students will complete the capstone project that was designed in REST 401. Students are also expected to prepare a presentation of their work. 
Prerequisite: REST 120 or by permission. 
Offered as needed.

Students should enroll in REST 401 in the first semester of their senior year. This 2-credit course will bring together all graduating majors and will be an opportunity to develop both common understanding of REST and individual senior projects tied to areas of emphasis. In the second semester, students will enroll in REST 402 and work independently under the supervision of seminar faculty and faculty advisors to complete their senior project.

The Minor
The minor consists of 6 courses minimum for a total of 24 credits. Students are required to take REST 120 Introduction to Race and Ethnic Studies (4). To ensure an interdisciplinary focus, students must select courses from two or more departments.

Registration Information
Each semester during registration, the Race and Ethnic Studies Program provides a current list of the REST concentration courses for the coming term. Because new courses (particularly Johnston courses and special topics courses in various departments) are likely to be added, this list will always have the most current course offerings. The current REST course list is posted on the Race and Ethnic Studies bulletin board in Larsen Hall, distributed to faculty advisors, and available from the director.

Concentration Courses

Johnston selected courses each year are also an option. 

ECON 240 Economics of Race, Class, and Gender (4 Credits)

The economic position of women and minorities in society. Racial and sexual discrimination, women’s labor force participation, occupational segregation, domestic work, immigration of workers, and racial marginalization in market economies. Mediating influences such as education, spatial forces, and institutional and public policies. Gender/race relations in industrial/Third World countries.
Prerequisites: ECON 100 or ECON 101 or by permission. 
Offered in alternate years. 

ENGL 233 African-American Literature (4 Credits)

Literature from the 18th century to the present. Major trends and themes are examined from historical, social, and psychological perspectives.

ENGL 237 Immigrant Literature (4 Credits)

Introduction to literature of U.S. immigration from the 19th century to the present. We will explore immigrant experience in terms of race, ethnicity, and national identity; cultural, religious, gender, and generational tensions; and assimilation in theory and practice, from the perspectives of those in the process of becoming Americans. 
Offered as needed.

ENGL 239 Chicana/o Literature (4 Credits)

Serves as an introduction to contemporary Chicana/o literature, emphasizing historical and cultural contexts. This class will focus on a body of work that emerges from the Chicana/o movement in the 1960s and continues to evolve as an expression of artistic and sociopolitical self-determination. 
Offered as needed.

POLI 208 California Politics (3-4 Credits)

A three-part course. The first part focuses on the current political environment in California, learning who the representatives are and how the system works. The second portion centers on reflection upon the past, and in the last section, students study how California’s institutions have formed and evolved over the years.

HIST 272 America and Asia (4 Credits)

China, Japan, and Southeast Asia are regions of vital strategic and economic concern to the United States. Examination of past and present friction and cooperation, prospects for future harmony, mutual perceptions, and Asian contributions to the making of America.

HIST 274 Vietnam (4 Credits)

Reconstruction of the era through films, popular music, and political and military strategy documents and social, economic, and political analysis made by contemporary writers. A special segment examines issues raised by the conflict and lessons learned for future military operations.

HIST 321 U.S. Civil War and Reconstruction (4 Credits)

This course analysis the cause, conduct, consequences, and memory of the U.S. Civil War and then the Reconstruction that followed. Topics include how various Americans understood, experienced, and documented the conflict and its aftermath and how the war shaped American culture, economy, and politics. 

HIST 323 California (4 Credits)

Evolution of California society traced from the arrival of Native Americans. Topics include the Spanish and Mexican colonization, Gold Rush, development of agri-business, industrialization, population growth, and the unique cultural and ethnic heritage of the state. Primarily for teaching credential students.

HIST 327 Modern African-American History (4 Credits)

Study of African-American history from emancipation to the present. Topics include the struggle to incorporate freedmen into the American polity and market economy; the development of African-American communities; and cultural, economic, and political changes that proved most significant for 20th-century African-American history. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 352 Africa and the Atlantic Slave Trade (4 Credits)

Examination of the central role of slavery and emancipation in the history of Africa and the Atlantic world from 1450–1900. While emphasizing the African experience, a consideration of the development of slave societies in the Americas will provide a comparative and more comprehensive view of the topic. 
Offered in alternate years.

PSYC 252 Culture and Human Behavior (4 Credits)

This course focuses on the role of culture in human behavior. Attention is given to (1) the conceptual, ethical, and methodological challenges involved in making cross-cultural comparisons, (2) understanding how psychological inquiry is informed by a cultural perspective, and (3) applying psychological principles in order to understand and improve intercultural interaction. 
Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or by permission. 
Note: Students who receive credit for this course may not receive credit for PSYC 435 Cross-Cultural Psychology.

PSYC 355 Psychology of Prejudice and Discrimination (4 Credits)

This course focuses on psychological theory and research as a mechanism for understanding prejudice and discrimination. The class explores cases based on such dimensions as gender, race/ ethnicity, class, age, religion, sexual orientation, and physical ability in order to investigate the causes and consequences of, and interventions for, intergroup prejudice and discrimination.
Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or by permission.

PSYC 435 Cross-Cultural Psychology (4 Credits)

The methods and issues involved in cross-cultural psychology. The first half is an exploration of cross-cultural methodology and an examination of the universality of psychological theory. The second half is a focus on how knowledge about cultural differences has been applied to situations of intercultural contact. 
Prerequisites: PSYC 100, and PSYC 250, and PSYC 300, or by permission.
Note: Students who receive credit for this course may not receive credit for PSYC 252, Culture and Human Behavior.

REL 125 Introduction to World Religions (4 Credits)

By studying major religious traditions of the world, students will consider how religious traditions guide the way people live their lives in an ever increasingly diverse and religiously pluralistic world. Investigations will include both historical studies and the writings of religious traditions.

REL 252 African-American Religion and Spirituality (4 Credits)

Intermediate-level lecture and discussion course, which is an examination of religious themes in African-American experience, including slavery, Black Church denominations (mainstream and Holiness), Black Nationhood and civil rights movements, Black Muslims, Black and Womanist (Black feminist) theologies, African religions in the Americas (Santeria and Voudoun), and new spiritual visions. 
Offered in alternate years.

Negotiable Courses
Faculty members may be willing to negotiate special assignments or projects, which add race and ethnic emphases into a course. These negotiable courses can then count toward the REST major and minor. Students should negotiate special assignments or projects in consultation with the instructor and the Race and Ethnic Studies director. Such negotiations should take place early in a semester or May Term to ensure that the course will be counted toward the major or minor.

Program Honors

Students with excellent records of academic achievement (GPA of 3.3 or higher in the major) may apply for program honors during the second semester of their junior year, and no later than the sixth full week of their first semester as a senior. Candidates must submit a proposal describing project goals, methods, timeline for completion, and annotated bibliography. Proposals are reviewed and approved by REST faculty. Completion of approved honors projects is overseen and evaluated by a faculty committee. Honors candidates are expected to make a public presentation of their work. For details about application process and criteria, please see the program director.

Individualized and Specialized Study 

Directed studies and internships can be arranged through Race and Ethnic Studies, and a number of departments including Art, Communicative Disorders, Economics, Education, History, Religion, Sociology and Anthropology, Spanish, and Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. In addition, specialized courses might be offered on a one-time or as-needed basis during May Term or through the Johnston Center.

Course Descriptions (REST)

REST 120 Introduction to Race and Ethnic Studies (4 Credits)

Examination of the historical and contemporary experiences of racial and ethnic groups in the United States. Topics include dimensions of racism and discrimination in American society, the interrelated experiences of racial groups, community-building and cultural development, and movements for social change.

REST 130 Introduction to Native American Studies (4 Credits)

This course provides an understanding of the history, culture, and current concerns of Native Americans. Traditional aspects of Native American cultures such as art and religions are explored, as well as topics affecting Native Americans today. The course also examines the influence of Native Americans on current American society.

REST 160 Topics in Race and Ethnic Studies (4 Credits)

Topics of current interest in race and ethnic studies. May be repeated for degree credit given different topics. 
Offered as needed.

REST 260 Topics in Race and Ethnic Studies (4 Credits)

Topics of current interest in race and ethnic studies. May be repeated for degree credit given different topics. 
Offered as needed.

REST 360 Topics in Race and Ethnic Studies (4 Credits)

Topics of current interest in race and ethnic studies. May be repeated for degree credit given different topics. 
Offered as needed.

REST 210 Reach Juvenile Justice (2 Credits)

This REACH class enables students to learn about the juvenile justice system as they volunteer to work with incarcerated youth as tutors and workshop facilitators. Students develop their own learning goals and write reflections to analyze their experience in juvenile hall to meet these goals. 
Credit/no credit only. 

REST 220 Ending Oppression (3 Credits)

Students will learn the theory and practice of Re-Evaluation Counseling and use the peer counseling tool to examine how various forms of oppression appear in society and impact their lives. May be repeated for degree credit for a maximum of 6 credits.
Prerequisite: by permission of instructor. 

REST 225 Juvenile Justice: Coming of Age From the Inside Out (4 Credits)

This course uses the juvenile justice system as a lens through which we can understand how race, class and gender shape coming of age in America. Students will learn about the juvenile justice system from the inside out in a shared classroom with young men who are incarcerated in San Bernardino.

REST 230 Race and the Law (4 Credits)

Provides a survey of the role of race and ethnicity in the American legal system. 
Offered as needed.

REST 231 Native American Women and Gender Issues (4 Credits)

This course examines the role of Native American women in traditional societies. It also investigates issues of concern in modern society for Native American women. The course further includes an exploration of gender issues in Native American Societies, including so-called two-spirit, or other gendered people. 
Offered in alternate years.

REST 232 Representing Race and Ethnicity in Film (4 Credits)

Explores the important role that dominant and alternative film practices have played in revealing, defining, and negotiating our understandings of race and ethnicity. 
Offered as needed.

REST 234 Race, Ethnicity, and Religion (4 Credits)

Examines ethnicity, race, and religion as constituents of personal and communal identity within a variety of religious traditions. 
Offered as needed.

REST 235 Hip Hop and Racial Politics (4 Credits)

This course will examine the race and gender politics of hip-hop, from its roots in U.S. cities and the black diaspora to its status as global popular culture today. We will explore how hip-hop redefines and reproduces our cultural understanding of race, gender, sexuality, and social class.
Offered as needed. 

REST 240 Chicana/o Art (4 Credits)

Introduction to contemporary Chicana/o art. Intersections of art and politics, as well as questions of race, class, gender, sexuality, religion, and culture will guide discussions of how Chicana/o art is viewed or ignored in contemporary American culture. Discussion on form as it relates to content, emphasizing visual analysis. 
Offered as needed.

REST 242 Southern California Indian Relationships with the Land (3 Credits)

This course examines Southern California Indian relations with the land in three ways: traditional societies are examined; the historical period from contact up to the modern era is explored; and modern issues of concern are addressed. This course emphasizes field trips and hands-on experiences.
Prerequisite: by permission of instructor. 

REST 245 Race and Science (4 Credits)

This course examines the last 200 years of the scientific study of race in Western Europe and the United States. A historical approach is taken through studies of contemporary issues which will be examined with the unique perspective that the historical analysis allows.

REST 255 Criminal Justice Policy and Action (3 Credits)

This class will engage students in research and action in collaboration with the Inland Empire Fair Chance Coalition which is working to reduce barriers people with criminal records face in the job market. Students will learn about the effects of criminal justice policies on our communities and explore diverse strategies advocates use to change criminal justice policies.

REST 315 Race and Education (4 Credits)

Explores issues of race and racism in the public schools and examines strategies used to address educational inequalities.
Offered as needed. 

REST 325 Race and Criminal Justice Policy (4 Credits)

This class will examine how race and gender affect our criminal justice policies at different points in policy-making and implementation, including arrest, trial, sentencing as well as the broad effects our criminal justice policies have on our communities, families, and ideas of race and citizenship.

REST 330 Race in the City (4 Credits)

This class examines how race and class have been built into urban and suburban spaces in the U.S. and offers students a variety of opportunities to explore, research and map the cities we live in.

REST 334 Native American Environmental Issues (4 Credits)

This course focuses on indigenous philosophies relating to creation and struggles for the land. It explores the situation in the Americas prior to contact, specific indigenous people, and current conflicts over land, resources, and environmental racism. Students will develop a holistic understanding of the Native ecological philosophies and environmental issues.
Offered in alternate years.

REST 335 Race, Gender and Public Policy (4 Credits)

This class explores the connection between race, gender and public policy making in America, past and present. We will focus on specific case studies of welfare systems, foster care, housing or criminal justice systems, and explore race and gender inequalities. 
Offered in alternate years.

REST 342 Race and Social Protest (4 Credits)

Explores how people of color collectively mobilized and re-shaped social/political attitudes and forms of civic participation while challenging patterns of racism in search of social equality. Students study various ideological perspectives, leadership styles, and political events that influenced the civil, feminist, labor, and human rights movements. 
Offered in alternate years.

REST 345 Whiteness and Anti-Racism (4 Credits)

The course examines the social construction of whiteness and traces how whites are implicated in the formation and continued existence of racism. The course also explores how whites have and can be effective allies in anti-racist activities. 
Offered as needed.

REST 346 Native American Religions and Worldviews (4 Credits)

This course examines the varieties of Native American religions in their traditional setting and modern manifestations. For traditional Indian religions, the relationship between philosophy, land, and culture is explored. For modern-day practices, Indian Christian thought, the Native American church, and issues related to cultural survival are examined.

REST 351 Race Theory (4 Credits)

Examination of theoretical perspectives on race and racism. Through close readings of texts and seminar discussion, students will develop comparative analytic skills needed to chart the theoretical contours of the field. Topics may include the social construction of race, globalization and race, and intersections of race, class, and gender.
Prerequisite: REST 120 or by permission.

REST 401 Senior Capstone I: Project Design (2 Credits)

The first of a two-semester capstone experience for REST majors. Designed to help students build upon, integrate, and extend previous REST work through the design and development of a proposal for a capstone project.
Prerequisite: REST 120 or by permission.
Offered as needed.

REST 402 Senior Capstone II: Project Implementation (2-4 Credits)

The second of a two-semester capstone experience. During this semester, students will complete the capstone project that was designed in REST 401. Students are also expected to prepare a presentation of their work. 
Prerequisite: REST 120 or by permission. 
Offered as needed.