History 

The Faculty 
Robert Y. Eng
Kathleen A. Feeley
John Glover
Jessie Hewitt
Kathy J. Ogren
Matthew T. Raffety
James A. Sandos, Emeritus
Patrick Wing

The History Department offers a global perspective for an interconnected world. Our curriculum teaches students historical method, theory, and analysis, and develops critical research, writing, and communication skills. In answering the questions, “What is history?” and “Why study history?” students learn multiple approaches for understanding the past, develop finely tuned interpretive skills, and construct clear and effective written and oral arguments. 

The Major
Students who major in history explore the voices and narratives of the past in classes where they are encouraged to engage in critical analysis of multiple perspectives. Majors take at least three of four foundation courses in World History and American History, and at least six electives. Faculty expertise in the history of the United States, Africa, Asia-Pacific, Comparative/Trans-Regional, Europe, Latin America, and the Middle East offers a global perspective on a wide range of social, cultural and political issues. Ideally by the end of the second year, history majors complete HIST 290 Theories and Methods, an introduction to the tools historians use to interpret historical sources and move beyond just "what happened when." In this course, students read and analyze historical literature and actively engage in historiographic debates.

In addition, majors personalize their program by declaring a thematic focus, tying together coursework and laying the foundation for a capstone project of original historical research completed in HIST 490. In an information-based economy, the BA in history provides an excellent foundation for a wide range of careers, including teaching, business, public service, law, journalism, advertising, public relations, publishing, historical preservation, and archival management.

Learning outcomes for this program may be found at www.redlands.edu/BA-HIST/learning-outcomes.

Bachelor of Arts
Students who choose to major in history must complete the following minimum requirements, usually in the sequence outlined.

Foundation Courses (3 courses/ 12 credits)

Please note: courses are to be completed by the end of sophomore year. 

HIST 101 World History to 1450 (4 Credits)

Introductory survey of the principal world civilizations of the ancient, classical, and medieval eras, with emphasis on the major features and patterns of change of each civilization in a comparative framework, and cross-cultural interactions and exchanges. Also considered are non-traditional approaches to history, such as the feminist perspective.

HIST 102 World History since 1450 (4 Credits)

Introduction to the chief themes or issues shaping world history from the European age of discovery through the end of the Cold War. Unavoidably selective, the course focuses upon the forces of modernization and change revolutionizing traditional world cultures and resulting in the interdependent, global system of today.

HIST 121 American History to 1877 (4 Credits)

This survey explores major themes in the development of American culture, economy, and politics from First Contact through Reconstruction. Topics include colonial encounters, the Revolutionary War, the rise of participatory democracy, slavery and the creation of race, the “Market Revolution,” geographic expansion, and the Civil War and its aftermath.

HIST 122 American History since 1877 (4 Credits)

This survey explores major themes in the development of American culture, economy, and politics from the Civil War and its aftermath to the present. Topics include the rise of American empire; industrialization; urbanization and suburbanization; war; political and social reform and activism; mass culture and mass media; and the study of class, race, gender, and sexuality.

Theories and Methods (1 course/ 4 credits)

HIST 290 Seminar in Historical Theories and Methods (4 Credits)

Overview of the study of history as discipline and practice, and as an approach to understand moral, social, economic, and political questions. This course covers historical theory, methodology, writing, and interpretation. Students will read and analyze historical literature and debates, write historiographic essays, and develop an emphasis in the major/minor.

Electives (6 courses/ 24 credits)
•A minimum of six courses to be completed, drawn from a pool of seven geographic regions. Only one course can be taken in each geographic region represented by (1) Africa, (2) Asia-Pacific, (3) Europe, (4) Latin America, (5) Middle East, (6) United States/North America (7) Comparative/ Trans-Regional (HIST 272 America and Asia and HIST 274 Vietnam count as Asia-Pacific regional courses). At least one of the six courses must be in a chronological era before 1900 and at least one of the six courses must be from a chronological era after 1900. At least two of the six courses must be at the 300 level.

Capstone Experience (1 course/ 4 credits)

HIST 490 Capstone Research Seminar (4 Credits)

This course serves as the culmination of the major. Each student will plan, research, draft, revise, and complete an original research paper of 18 to 20 pages, reflecting advanced historiographical understanding and skill under the guidance and with the approval of department faculty. Content will be driven by student projects.
Prerequisite: prior coursework in the major and senior standing or by instructor permission.

The Minor
Students who minor in history complete three foundation courses in World History and American History as well as at least four elective courses. History minors also complete HIST 290, Theories and Methods. The critical thinking and research skills developed in the History minor complement any number of major programs in the humanities as well as the natural and social sciences and prepare students for a wide range of careers. Students minoring in history must complete the following requirements, usually in the sequence outlined.

Foundation Courses (3 courses/ 12 credits)

Please note: ideally to be completed by the end of the sophomore year. Students will select 3 from the following: 

HIST 101 World History to 1450 (4 Credits)

Introductory survey of the principal world civilizations of the ancient, classical, and medieval eras, with emphasis on the major features and patterns of change of each civilization in a comparative framework, and cross-cultural interactions and exchanges. Also considered are non-traditional approaches to history, such as the feminist perspective.

HIST 102 World History since 1450 (4 Credits)

Introduction to the chief themes or issues shaping world history from the European age of discovery through the end of the Cold War. Unavoidably selective, the course focuses upon the forces of modernization and change revolutionizing traditional world cultures and resulting in the interdependent, global system of today.

HIST 121 American History to 1877 (4 Credits)

This survey explores major themes in the development of American culture, economy, and politics from First Contact through Reconstruction. Topics include colonial encounters, the Revolutionary War, the rise of participatory democracy, slavery and the creation of race, the “Market Revolution,” geographic expansion, and the Civil War and its aftermath.

HIST 122 American History since 1877 (4 Credits)

This survey explores major themes in the development of American culture, economy, and politics from the Civil War and its aftermath to the present. Topics include the rise of American empire; industrialization; urbanization and suburbanization; war; political and social reform and activism; mass culture and mass media; and the study of class, race, gender, and sexuality.

Theories and Methods (1 course/ 4 credits)

HIST 290 Seminar in Historical Theories and Methods (4 Credits)

Overview of the study of history as discipline and practice, and as an approach to understand moral, social, economic, and political questions. This course covers historical theory, methodology, writing, and interpretation. Students will read and analyze historical literature and debates, write historiographic essays, and develop an emphasis in the major/minor.

Electives (4 courses/ 16 credits)
• A total of four courses are required, drawn from a pool of seven geographic regions. Only one course can be taken in each geographic region represented by (1) Africa, (2) Asia-Pacific, (3) Europe, (4) Latin America, (5) Middle East, (6) United States/North America (7) Comparative/Trans-Regional (HIST 272 America and Asia and HIST 274 Vietnam count as Asia-Pacific regional courses). Of the four courses, at least one must be in a chronological era before 1900; at least one must be from a chronological era after 1900; and at least one must be at the 300 level.

Foundation Courses

HIST 101 World History to 1450 (4 Credits)

Introductory survey of the principal world civilizations of the ancient, classical, and medieval eras, with emphasis on the major features and patterns of change of each civilization in a comparative framework, and cross-cultural interactions and exchanges. Also considered are non-traditional approaches to history, such as the feminist perspective.

HIST 102 World History since 1450 (4 Credits)

Introduction to the chief themes or issues shaping world history from the European age of discovery through the end of the Cold War. Unavoidably selective, the course focuses upon the forces of modernization and change revolutionizing traditional world cultures and resulting in the interdependent, global system of today.

HIST 121 American History to 1877 (4 Credits)

This survey explores major themes in the development of American culture, economy, and politics from First Contact through Reconstruction. Topics include colonial encounters, the Revolutionary War, the rise of participatory democracy, slavery and the creation of race, the “Market Revolution,” geographic expansion, and the Civil War and its aftermath.

HIST 122 American History since 1877 (4 Credits)

This survey explores major themes in the development of American culture, economy, and politics from the Civil War and its aftermath to the present. Topics include the rise of American empire; industrialization; urbanization and suburbanization; war; political and social reform and activism; mass culture and mass media; and the study of class, race, gender, and sexuality.

Area Focus Courses

HIST 111 Early Modern Europe (4 Credits)

Exploration of the profound transformation that occurred in European culture as it moved from its medieval configuration to the essentially modern form assumed by the end of the 18th century. Topics include the Renaissance, the Reformation, the Enlightenment, the birth of modern science, and the English and French revolutions.

HIST 112 Modern Europe (4 Credits)

Development of European civilization from its 19th-century display of vigorous, commanding growth to its 20th-century expressions of uncertainty, fragmentation, and barbarity. Topics include the French and Industrial revolutions, Romanticism, the rise of radical social theory, the challenge of irrationalism, the savagery of totalitarianism, total war, and genocide.

HIST 131 Latin American Civilizations (4 Credits)

Introduction to Latin America through analysis of selected social, economic, and political themes. Topics include the colonial heritage, economic dependency, a stratified society, the role of the church, the Latin American military, and the influence of the United States in the region. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 141 Classical Asian Civilizations: China and Japan (4 Credits)

Study of the Chinese and Japanese civilizations before the encounter between East and West, and these civilizations’ philosophical, material, and institutional contributions to world culture. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 142 Modern Asian Civilizations: China and Japan (4 Credits)

China and Japan are traced from the height of empire through their respective transformations under the impact of Western imperialism to the present day. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 151 The African Experience Before 1800 (4 Credits)

The history of sub-Saharan Africa before the era of European Imperialism. The diversity of African societies will be emphasized by exploring the relationships between geography, environment, and history across the continent. Topics include cultural ecology, ethnicity, Africa’s place in the Islamic world, and the Atlantic slave trade. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 152 The Emergence of Modern Africa (4 Credits)

The history of sub-Saharan Africa from the end of the Atlantic slave trade to the present. Agency and the development of new African identities underscore an interdisciplinary examination of how Africa negotiated European colonization and the subsequent challenges of independence and neo-imperialism. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 200 History of Wine (3 Credits)

The study of the history of wine as it has evolved from its origins over 5,000 years ago in Russia to its contemporary development in California. Instructing how best to develop the necessary skills to communicate and appreciate the emergence of wine as a focus of culture and lifestyle; hence the prerequisites. 
Prerequisite: Must be minimum 21 years of age. Course fee applies.

HIST 215 History of Disability (4 Credits)

This course examines the history of disability since 1500. Topics include the difference between early modern and modern understandings of sickness and health; the professionalization of medicine; disability and the nation-state; disability and modern warfare; eugenics in fascist and liberal societies; and the disability rights movement. 
Offered as needed. 
Numeric and Evaluation grade only. 

HIST 223 Anxiety, Race, and Empire: U.S. c. 1900 (4 Credits)

From 1876–1917, the U.S. experienced optimism and dismay over profound economic, demographic, cultural, and political changes. This course explores shifting conceptions of race and empire (both on the closing frontier and worldwide); mass media’s development; and questions of modernity, authenticity, and identity at the oft-bewildering dawn of the “American Century.” 
Offered as needed.

HIST 224 History of Sports in America (4 Credits)

Examines historical development and shifting meanings of American sports from the colonial era through the present. We focus on links between sports and national identity, industrialization, religion, and urbanization; and the issues of race, class, gender, and sexuality on and off the field. We may even get in a few games ourselves. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 225 Public History: Applications in American Life (4 Credits)

Students apply historical methods locally, addressing such questions as how the past becomes history, who uses history in the local community, and how priorities are set in collecting and preserving the past. Students pursue individual projects involving direct experience with primary sources. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 226 Native American History, 1600–Present (4 Credits)

Survey of Native American history from the era of first contact with Europeans to contemporary controversies. Topics include the contesting of European colonization, the phenomenon of intercultural captivity, the “era of removal,” battles over cultural assimilation, personal and collective identities, American Indian law, gender issues, and tribal sovereignty. 
Offered in alternate years.

HIST 228 U.S. City and Suburb (4 Credits)

Where and how Americans have chosen or have been forced by circumstance to live, work, and play and how this has changed over the last century will be the central focus. Topics include immigration, industrialization, urbanization, suburbanization, social reform, and activism. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 229 U.S. History on Film (3-4 Credits)

Analyze history of U.S. film industry and society and explore the political, economic, social, and cultural meaning of film. Consider strengths and limits of film as a tool for understanding U.S. culture and history. Key themes: class; gender; and racial conflict and consciousness; and the rise of a mass consumer culture and American empire. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 231 Brazil (4 Credits)

Brazil since 1500 is examined in light of the struggle between economic development and political democracy. Special emphasis is given to treatment of Indians, foreign ideology and investment, African religions, and state building.
Offered as needed.

HIST 232 Mexico (4 Credits)

Analysis of Mexican history from the pre-Columbian era to the present, with heavy focus on the 19th and 20th centuries, especially the Mexican Revolution and its aftermath. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 240 Modern China (4 Credits)

Survey of China from the founding of the Qing empire to the present: the zenith of the imperial-bureaucratic state in the 18th century; China’s disintegration under the blows of Western aggression and internal rebellion; and the great political, social, and intellectual upheavals of the 20th century. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 242 Modern Japan (4 Credits)

How did Japan emerge from the ashes of World War II to become the world’s second-largest economy? The answer begins with feudal Japan’s disintegration under the impact of internal rebellion and Western imperialism, continues with Japan’s rise to imperialist and militarist power, and culminates with the postwar economic miracle. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 243 War and Society in Korean Films (3 Credits)

Korea is both an ancient civilization and a geopolitical hot spot. South Korea has transformed itself from an impoverished military dictatorship to a vibrant and wealthy democracy, while nuclear-armed North Korea generates international tensions through its militancy. This course provides an introduction to Korea through texts and films.

HIST 244 Hong Kong Cinema from Bruce Lee to Jet Li (4 Credits)

Critical analysis of Hong Kong’s history as global city and China’s gateway to the world through texts and films by auteurs such as John Woo and Wong Kar-Wai: anti-colonial struggles; action stars as global icons; crime and punishment; identity politics; construction of masculinity and gender relations; immigrants and emigrants etc. 

 

HIST 251 Mapping African History (4 Credits)

A spatial approach to African history involving a critical examination of the relationships between space and history in Africa and the demonstration of those relationships through mapping. The use of GIS (geographic information systems) provides a wide range of tools to analyze a range of historical topics. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 260 Topics in History (3-4 Credits)

Introductory study of compelling contemporary problems any place on the globe, with an emphasis on how study of the past illuminates the present. Possible topics: the modern Middle East, issues in Native American history, and modern Africa. May be repeated for degree credit given a different topic.

HIST 272 America and Asia (4 Credits)

China, Japan, and Southeast Asia are regions of vital strategic and economic concern to the United States. Examination of past and present friction and cooperation, prospects for future harmony, mutual perceptions, and Asian contributions to the making of America.

HIST 273 Cyberculture and the Networked Society in the Information Age (4 Credits)

The Information Revolution has ushered in a new age of transformative changes in social interactions, techniques of production and commerce, cultural modes and practices, and political institutions and processes. Examination of the impact of computers, the Internet, and the World Wide Web on human society and global culture. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 274 Vietnam (4 Credits)

Reconstruction of the era through films, popular music, and political and military strategy documents and social, economic, and political analysis made by contemporary writers. A special segment examines issues raised by the conflict and lessons learned for future military operations.

HIST 281 History of the Islamic Middle East (600-1800) (4 Credits)

History of Islam between the Nile and Oxus rivers, from the time of the Prophet Muhammad until the end of the 18th century. Themes include the earliest Muslim community, the question of leadership and sectarian divisions, non-Muslim communities living within Islamic society, mysticism, and women and the harem. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 282 History of the Modern Middle East (4 Credits)

This course is an introduction to the history of the Middle East from the early 19th century to the present. Topics include growing Western influence, changing interpretations of religion, origins and history of the Israel-Palestine conflict, and the role of the U.S. in the Middle East since World War I. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 283 The Ottomans in Europe: Nationalism, Islam, and Empire (4 Credits)

History of Ottoman society in Europe, from the 14th century to World War I. Emphasis on Ottoman integration of a wide diversity of religious, ethnic, and linguistic populations, as well as the challenges faced by the rise of nationalism in the 19th century, and the gradual disintegration of Ottoman rule.
Offered as needed.

HIST 284 The Middle East on Film (3 Credits)

This course examines the depiction of the Middle East in popular Hollywood movies, as well as the history and culture of the region through the work of screenwriters and directors from countries such as Iran, Israel, Lebanon, and Turkey. 

Historical Theories and Methods

HIST 290 Seminar in Historical Theories and Methods (4 Credits)

Overview of the study of history as discipline and practice, and as an approach to understand moral, social, economic, and political questions. This course covers historical theory, methodology, writing, and interpretation. Students will read and analyze historical literature and debates, write historiographic essays, and develop an emphasis in the major/minor.

HIST 311 Europe: 1890–1945 (4 Credits)

The great upheavals and ordeals of Europe in the first half of the 20th century: the first and second World Wars, the rise of fascism and communism, the Third Reich and the Holocaust, and the collapse of Europe after Hitler’s war. 
Prerequisite: HIST 290. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 315 France and the World, 1750-present (4 Credits)

This course examines the history of France and the French Empire since 1750. Topics include the French and Haitian Revolutions, the industrial revolution and nineteenth-century culture, the colonization and decolonization of Algeria, the First and Second World Wars, and contemporary debates over immigration, religion, and race. 

HIST 318 Gender and Sexuality in Modern European History (4 Credits)

This course examines the history of gender and sexuality in Europe since 1750. Topics include the influence of the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, and the Industrial Revolution on the development of the new gender ideals, the “invention” of sexuality, the links between gender and empire, and the long sexual revolution. 

 

HIST 320 U.S. Cultural History (4 Credits)

Explores the nature and purpose of the historian’s craft and the historical method through the rise of cultural history in modern U.S. Topics include the rise of industrial capitalism and growth of urban mass consumer culture and its output, including film and television.

HIST 321 U.S. Civil War and Reconstruction (4 Credits)

This course analysis the cause, conduct, consequences, and memory of the U.S. Civil War and then the Reconstruction that followed. Topics include how various Americans understood, experienced, and documented the conflict and its aftermath and how the war shaped American culture, economy, and politics. 

HIST 323 California (4 Credits)

Evolution of California society traced from the arrival of Native Americans. Topics include the Spanish and Mexican colonization, Gold Rush, development of agri-business, industrialization, population growth, and the unique cultural and ethnic heritage of the state. Primarily for teaching credential students.

HIST 324 Cold War America (4 Credits)

Explore how the Cold War has shaped U.S. (and global) economy, culture, politics, gender roles, media, and history. Topics include McCarthyism, nuclear politics, civil rights activism and backlash and Cold War literature.
Offered as needed.

HIST 326 Primary Witness in Women’s (4 Credits)

Examination of four major kinds of primary documents used to reclaim and analyze United States women’s history: diaries, correspondence, oral narratives, and autobiographies. Focus on the problems posed by private and public evidence in historical scholarship. Students also apply these methods to their own writings and research. 
Prerequisite: HIST 290.
Offered as needed.

HIST 327 Modern African-American History (4 Credits)

Study of African-American history from emancipation to the present. Topics include the struggle to incorporate freedmen into the American polity and market economy; the development of African-American communities; and cultural, economic, and political changes that proved most significant for 20th-century African-American history. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 328 Gender, Media, and U.S. Culture (4 Credits)

Study of gender and media theory and history in modern United States. Major themes include the evolution of the mass media, how this media both reflects and shapes gender roles and norms, and how gender norms and stereotypes have evolved and have also shaped U.S. media.

HIST 330 Rise of the Anglo-Atlantic World 1500–1815 (4 Credits)

Research seminar examining the development of the Anglophone Atlantic from the 16th through the 19th centuries as a maritime empire that bound together people, goods, and ideas from four continents centered on the Atlantic, while exploring the promise and perils of the “Atlantic turn” in historiography. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 332 U.S. in the Era of Jefferson and Jackson (4 Credits)

Examines the critical period in the early American republic, 1789–1850. Particular attention is given to the rise of popular democratic participation and the party politics, the development of race as a central line of division, and the economic and cultural processes by which the U.S. began to cohere as a nation. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 343 China since 1949 (4 Credits)

The People’s Republic of China has undertaken some of the most spectacular social experiments the world has ever witnessed. Examination of the P.R.C.’s revolutionary roots, ideological foundations, social and institutional innovations, and changing relationships with the United States and the former Soviet Union.

HIST 344 The Pacific Rim: Economic Dynamism and Challenge for America (4 Credits)

The Pacific Rim is the world’s most dynamic region, where the economic expansion of Japan, Taiwan, South Korea, Singapore, and Hong Kong is now matched by China and other Southeast Asian nations. Focus on historical and cultural sources of Asian economic strength, and opportunities and challenges presented to the United States. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 352 Africa and the Atlantic Slave Trade (4 Credits)

Examination of the central role of slavery and emancipation in the history of Africa and the Atlantic world from 1450–1900. While emphasizing the African experience, a consideration of the development of slave societies in the Americas will provide a comparative and more comprehensive view of the topic. 
Offered in alternate years.

HIST 354 Race and History in South Africa (4 Credits)

An exploration of the major developments in South Africa that led to the creation of apartheid or racial separation. African perceptions of European colonization, industrialization, urbanization, and land alienation are stressed. The course concludes with a look at the work of African nationalist leaders such as Mandela and Biko. 
Offered in alternate years.

HIST 381 Mongol World Empire (4 Credits)

Research seminar on the Mongol Empire, which stretched from Korea to Hungary in the 13th and 14th centuries. Topics include pastoral nomadic origins; the life and legacy of Chinggis Khan; Mongol encounters with Chinese, Islamic, and Latin Christian societies; and the Mongols as brokers of cross-cultural exchange.
Offered as needed.

HIST 382 Religion and Politics in Iran (4 Credits)

This course examines the relationship between religious and political authority in Iran. Focus is on the modern period. Topics include traditional Persian kingship, Shi`i Islam, the Constitutional Revolution of 1905–1911, the CIA-led coup of 1953, the Iranian Revolution of 1978–1979, and life in the contemporary Islamic Republic. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 376 California Indian Seminar (4 Credits)

The result of combining ethnography and history into ethnohistory presents the Native American side of Indian-White relations in California. Using GIS tools of analysis and plotting permits mapping Indian movement in the mission system, revealing their agency and growing power in coping with European and American directed social change.

Advanced Seminars

HIST 360 Historical Problems (4 Credits)

In-depth treatment of selected topics in social, intellectual, economic, women’s, and ethnic history. Possible topics: debating change in the modern American West and issues in Chicano history. May be repeated for degree credit given a different topic. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 401 Advanced Reading Colloquium (2 Credits)

Opportunity for students and instructor(s) to examine a historical problem or body of literature in a small, collaborative setting. Topic is open to interests of participants. 
Prerequisite: by permission.

HIST 490 Capstone Research Seminar (4 Credits)

This course serves as the culmination of the major. Each student will plan, research, draft, revise, and complete an original research paper of 18 to 20 pages, reflecting advanced historiographical understanding and skill under the guidance and with the approval of department faculty. Content will be driven by student projects.
Prerequisite: prior coursework in the major and senior standing or by instructor permission.

HIST 499 Honors Thesis in History (2-4 Credits)

Students approved by the department continue the work done in HIST 490 to develop an extended, original Honors Thesis that seeks to break meaningful new ground in its research topic. 

Special Offerings

HIST 185 Public History Internship (1-4 Credits)

Independent internship overseen by faculty member in partnership with a local historical institution. Duties, responsibilities, opportunities, and availability will vary. Students will work in concert with public history professionals in an archive, museum, or other public history setting. Repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits. 
Offered as needed.
Credit/no credit only.

Undergraduate Students
Students from the College of Arts and Sciences interested in earning a teaching credential must apply to the School of Education. Undergraduate students can enroll in Child Development (EDUG 331) and Educational Foundations (EDUG 401) before the School of Education admission process. Students need to contact an enrollment counselor to discuss the best credential program pathway.

Additional Requirements for Those Seeking Teaching Credentials 
To be eligible to be recommended for the Preliminary Teaching Credential or the Preliminary Education Specialist Credential, candidates must meet the U.S. Constitution requirement. For details on meeting this requirement, contact the School of Education. Introduction to American Politics (POLI 111) or American History to 1877 (HIST 121), in the College of Arta and Sciences, or their equivalents, satisfy the requirement.  

Advanced Placement in History 
1. For AP scores of 1, 2, or 3 in U.S., European, or World History, no credit will be awarded by the department.
2. For AP scores of 4 or 5, the department awards four credits for each score presented:
In U.S. History, credit is given for HIST 122. 
In European History, credit is given for HIST 112. 
In World History, credit is given for HIST 102.

International Baccalaureate 
1. For a score of 6 or higher in History higher level Route 1, credit is given for HIST 111.
2. For a score of 6 or higher in History higher level Route 2, credit is given for HIST 102.

Internships
For exceptional students, particularly those with a focus on Public History, the department offers credit-bearing internships in partnership with local archives and historical facilities. In the past, students have held placements at the Watchorn Lincoln Shrine, Smiley Library, Kimberly Crest, University Archives, and others. Interested students should contact the department chair for details.

Departmental Honors
A departmental honors program is available for exceptionally able and motivated students. Students with a cumulative GPA of 3.50 or better may initiate an application to take the program. Interested students must consult with the Department Chair for information about the application procedure and requirements. Application deadline is Monday of the fourth week of the first semester of the senior year. Ordinarily, students will take HIST 490 in the fall and HIST 499 in the spring semester of their senior year with their major research paper completed and thesis defended by the last day of spring semester classes.

Course Descriptions (HIST)

HIST 101 World History to 1450 (4 Credits)

Introductory survey of the principal world civilizations of the ancient, classical, and medieval eras, with emphasis on the major features and patterns of change of each civilization in a comparative framework, and cross-cultural interactions and exchanges. Also considered are non-traditional approaches to history, such as the feminist perspective.

HIST 102 World History since 1450 (4 Credits)

Introduction to the chief themes or issues shaping world history from the European age of discovery through the end of the Cold War. Unavoidably selective, the course focuses upon the forces of modernization and change revolutionizing traditional world cultures and resulting in the interdependent, global system of today.

HIST 111 Early Modern Europe (4 Credits)

Exploration of the profound transformation that occurred in European culture as it moved from its medieval configuration to the essentially modern form assumed by the end of the 18th century. Topics include the Renaissance, the Reformation, the Enlightenment, the birth of modern science, and the English and French revolutions.

HIST 112 Modern Europe (4 Credits)

Development of European civilization from its 19th-century display of vigorous, commanding growth to its 20th-century expressions of uncertainty, fragmentation, and barbarity. Topics include the French and Industrial revolutions, Romanticism, the rise of radical social theory, the challenge of irrationalism, the savagery of totalitarianism, total war, and genocide.

HIST 121 American History to 1877 (4 Credits)

This survey explores major themes in the development of American culture, economy, and politics from First Contact through Reconstruction. Topics include colonial encounters, the Revolutionary War, the rise of participatory democracy, slavery and the creation of race, the “Market Revolution,” geographic expansion, and the Civil War and its aftermath.

HIST 122 American History since 1877 (4 Credits)

This survey explores major themes in the development of American culture, economy, and politics from the Civil War and its aftermath to the present. Topics include the rise of American empire; industrialization; urbanization and suburbanization; war; political and social reform and activism; mass culture and mass media; and the study of class, race, gender, and sexuality.

HIST 131 Latin American Civilizations (4 Credits)

Introduction to Latin America through analysis of selected social, economic, and political themes. Topics include the colonial heritage, economic dependency, a stratified society, the role of the church, the Latin American military, and the influence of the United States in the region. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 141 Classical Asian Civilizations: China and Japan (4 Credits)

Study of the Chinese and Japanese civilizations before the encounter between East and West, and these civilizations’ philosophical, material, and institutional contributions to world culture. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 142 Modern Asian Civilizations: China and Japan (4 Credits)

China and Japan are traced from the height of empire through their respective transformations under the impact of Western imperialism to the present day. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 151 The African Experience Before 1800 (4 Credits)

The history of sub-Saharan Africa before the era of European Imperialism. The diversity of African societies will be emphasized by exploring the relationships between geography, environment, and history across the continent. Topics include cultural ecology, ethnicity, Africa’s place in the Islamic world, and the Atlantic slave trade. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 152 The Emergence of Modern Africa (4 Credits)

The history of sub-Saharan Africa from the end of the Atlantic slave trade to the present. Agency and the development of new African identities underscore an interdisciplinary examination of how Africa negotiated European colonization and the subsequent challenges of independence and neo-imperialism. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 185 Public History Internship (1-4 Credits)

Independent internship overseen by faculty member in partnership with a local historical institution. Duties, responsibilities, opportunities, and availability will vary. Students will work in concert with public history professionals in an archive, museum, or other public history setting. Repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits. 
Offered as needed.
Credit/no credit only.

HIST 200 History of Wine (3 Credits)

The study of the history of wine as it has evolved from its origins over 5,000 years ago in Russia to its contemporary development in California. Instructing how best to develop the necessary skills to communicate and appreciate the emergence of wine as a focus of culture and lifestyle; hence the prerequisites. 
Prerequisite: Must be minimum 21 years of age. Course fee applies.

HIST 215 History of Disability (4 Credits)

This course examines the history of disability since 1500. Topics include the difference between early modern and modern understandings of sickness and health; the professionalization of medicine; disability and the nation-state; disability and modern warfare; eugenics in fascist and liberal societies; and the disability rights movement. 
Offered as needed. 
Numeric and Evaluation grade only. 

HIST 223 Anxiety, Race, and Empire: U.S. c. 1900 (4 Credits)

From 1876–1917, the U.S. experienced optimism and dismay over profound economic, demographic, cultural, and political changes. This course explores shifting conceptions of race and empire (both on the closing frontier and worldwide); mass media’s development; and questions of modernity, authenticity, and identity at the oft-bewildering dawn of the “American Century.” 
Offered as needed.

HIST 224 History of Sports in America (4 Credits)

Examines historical development and shifting meanings of American sports from the colonial era through the present. We focus on links between sports and national identity, industrialization, religion, and urbanization; and the issues of race, class, gender, and sexuality on and off the field. We may even get in a few games ourselves. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 225 Public History: Applications in American Life (4 Credits)

Students apply historical methods locally, addressing such questions as how the past becomes history, who uses history in the local community, and how priorities are set in collecting and preserving the past. Students pursue individual projects involving direct experience with primary sources. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 226 Native American History, 1600–Present (4 Credits)

Survey of Native American history from the era of first contact with Europeans to contemporary controversies. Topics include the contesting of European colonization, the phenomenon of intercultural captivity, the “era of removal,” battles over cultural assimilation, personal and collective identities, American Indian law, gender issues, and tribal sovereignty. 
Offered in alternate years.

HIST 228 U.S. City and Suburb (4 Credits)

Where and how Americans have chosen or have been forced by circumstance to live, work, and play and how this has changed over the last century will be the central focus. Topics include immigration, industrialization, urbanization, suburbanization, social reform, and activism. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 229 U.S. History on Film (3-4 Credits)

Analyze history of U.S. film industry and society and explore the political, economic, social, and cultural meaning of film. Consider strengths and limits of film as a tool for understanding U.S. culture and history. Key themes: class; gender; and racial conflict and consciousness; and the rise of a mass consumer culture and American empire. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 231 Brazil (4 Credits)

Brazil since 1500 is examined in light of the struggle between economic development and political democracy. Special emphasis is given to treatment of Indians, foreign ideology and investment, African religions, and state building.
Offered as needed.

HIST 232 Mexico (4 Credits)

Analysis of Mexican history from the pre-Columbian era to the present, with heavy focus on the 19th and 20th centuries, especially the Mexican Revolution and its aftermath. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 240 Modern China (4 Credits)

Survey of China from the founding of the Qing empire to the present: the zenith of the imperial-bureaucratic state in the 18th century; China’s disintegration under the blows of Western aggression and internal rebellion; and the great political, social, and intellectual upheavals of the 20th century. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 242 Modern Japan (4 Credits)

How did Japan emerge from the ashes of World War II to become the world’s second-largest economy? The answer begins with feudal Japan’s disintegration under the impact of internal rebellion and Western imperialism, continues with Japan’s rise to imperialist and militarist power, and culminates with the postwar economic miracle. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 243 War and Society in Korean Films (3 Credits)

Korea is both an ancient civilization and a geopolitical hot spot. South Korea has transformed itself from an impoverished military dictatorship to a vibrant and wealthy democracy, while nuclear-armed North Korea generates international tensions through its militancy. This course provides an introduction to Korea through texts and films.

HIST 244 Hong Kong Cinema from Bruce Lee to Jet Li (4 Credits)

Critical analysis of Hong Kong’s history as global city and China’s gateway to the world through texts and films by auteurs such as John Woo and Wong Kar-Wai: anti-colonial struggles; action stars as global icons; crime and punishment; identity politics; construction of masculinity and gender relations; immigrants and emigrants etc. 

 

HIST 251 Mapping African History (4 Credits)

A spatial approach to African history involving a critical examination of the relationships between space and history in Africa and the demonstration of those relationships through mapping. The use of GIS (geographic information systems) provides a wide range of tools to analyze a range of historical topics. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 260 Topics in History (3-4 Credits)

Introductory study of compelling contemporary problems any place on the globe, with an emphasis on how study of the past illuminates the present. Possible topics: the modern Middle East, issues in Native American history, and modern Africa. May be repeated for degree credit given a different topic.

HIST 272 America and Asia (4 Credits)

China, Japan, and Southeast Asia are regions of vital strategic and economic concern to the United States. Examination of past and present friction and cooperation, prospects for future harmony, mutual perceptions, and Asian contributions to the making of America.

HIST 273 Cyberculture and the Networked Society in the Information Age (4 Credits)

The Information Revolution has ushered in a new age of transformative changes in social interactions, techniques of production and commerce, cultural modes and practices, and political institutions and processes. Examination of the impact of computers, the Internet, and the World Wide Web on human society and global culture. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 274 Vietnam (4 Credits)

Reconstruction of the era through films, popular music, and political and military strategy documents and social, economic, and political analysis made by contemporary writers. A special segment examines issues raised by the conflict and lessons learned for future military operations.

HIST 281 History of the Islamic Middle East (600-1800) (4 Credits)

History of Islam between the Nile and Oxus rivers, from the time of the Prophet Muhammad until the end of the 18th century. Themes include the earliest Muslim community, the question of leadership and sectarian divisions, non-Muslim communities living within Islamic society, mysticism, and women and the harem. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 282 History of the Modern Middle East (4 Credits)

This course is an introduction to the history of the Middle East from the early 19th century to the present. Topics include growing Western influence, changing interpretations of religion, origins and history of the Israel-Palestine conflict, and the role of the U.S. in the Middle East since World War I. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 283 The Ottomans in Europe: Nationalism, Islam, and Empire (4 Credits)

History of Ottoman society in Europe, from the 14th century to World War I. Emphasis on Ottoman integration of a wide diversity of religious, ethnic, and linguistic populations, as well as the challenges faced by the rise of nationalism in the 19th century, and the gradual disintegration of Ottoman rule.
Offered as needed.

HIST 284 The Middle East on Film (3 Credits)

This course examines the depiction of the Middle East in popular Hollywood movies, as well as the history and culture of the region through the work of screenwriters and directors from countries such as Iran, Israel, Lebanon, and Turkey. 

HIST 290 Seminar in Historical Theories and Methods (4 Credits)

Overview of the study of history as discipline and practice, and as an approach to understand moral, social, economic, and political questions. This course covers historical theory, methodology, writing, and interpretation. Students will read and analyze historical literature and debates, write historiographic essays, and develop an emphasis in the major/minor.

HIST 311 Europe: 1890–1945 (4 Credits)

The great upheavals and ordeals of Europe in the first half of the 20th century: the first and second World Wars, the rise of fascism and communism, the Third Reich and the Holocaust, and the collapse of Europe after Hitler’s war. 
Prerequisite: HIST 290. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 315 France and the World, 1750-present (4 Credits)

This course examines the history of France and the French Empire since 1750. Topics include the French and Haitian Revolutions, the industrial revolution and nineteenth-century culture, the colonization and decolonization of Algeria, the First and Second World Wars, and contemporary debates over immigration, religion, and race. 

HIST 318 Gender and Sexuality in Modern European History (4 Credits)

This course examines the history of gender and sexuality in Europe since 1750. Topics include the influence of the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, and the Industrial Revolution on the development of the new gender ideals, the “invention” of sexuality, the links between gender and empire, and the long sexual revolution. 

 

HIST 320 U.S. Cultural History (4 Credits)

Explores the nature and purpose of the historian’s craft and the historical method through the rise of cultural history in modern U.S. Topics include the rise of industrial capitalism and growth of urban mass consumer culture and its output, including film and television.

HIST 321 U.S. Civil War and Reconstruction (4 Credits)

This course analysis the cause, conduct, consequences, and memory of the U.S. Civil War and then the Reconstruction that followed. Topics include how various Americans understood, experienced, and documented the conflict and its aftermath and how the war shaped American culture, economy, and politics. 

HIST 323 California (4 Credits)

Evolution of California society traced from the arrival of Native Americans. Topics include the Spanish and Mexican colonization, Gold Rush, development of agri-business, industrialization, population growth, and the unique cultural and ethnic heritage of the state. Primarily for teaching credential students.

HIST 324 Cold War America (4 Credits)

Explore how the Cold War has shaped U.S. (and global) economy, culture, politics, gender roles, media, and history. Topics include McCarthyism, nuclear politics, civil rights activism and backlash and Cold War literature.
Offered as needed.

HIST 326 Primary Witness in Women’s (4 Credits)

Examination of four major kinds of primary documents used to reclaim and analyze United States women’s history: diaries, correspondence, oral narratives, and autobiographies. Focus on the problems posed by private and public evidence in historical scholarship. Students also apply these methods to their own writings and research. 
Prerequisite: HIST 290.
Offered as needed.

HIST 327 Modern African-American History (4 Credits)

Study of African-American history from emancipation to the present. Topics include the struggle to incorporate freedmen into the American polity and market economy; the development of African-American communities; and cultural, economic, and political changes that proved most significant for 20th-century African-American history. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 328 Gender, Media, and U.S. Culture (4 Credits)

Study of gender and media theory and history in modern United States. Major themes include the evolution of the mass media, how this media both reflects and shapes gender roles and norms, and how gender norms and stereotypes have evolved and have also shaped U.S. media.

HIST 330 Rise of the Anglo-Atlantic World 1500–1815 (4 Credits)

Research seminar examining the development of the Anglophone Atlantic from the 16th through the 19th centuries as a maritime empire that bound together people, goods, and ideas from four continents centered on the Atlantic, while exploring the promise and perils of the “Atlantic turn” in historiography. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 332 U.S. in the Era of Jefferson and Jackson (4 Credits)

Examines the critical period in the early American republic, 1789–1850. Particular attention is given to the rise of popular democratic participation and the party politics, the development of race as a central line of division, and the economic and cultural processes by which the U.S. began to cohere as a nation. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 343 China since 1949 (4 Credits)

The People’s Republic of China has undertaken some of the most spectacular social experiments the world has ever witnessed. Examination of the P.R.C.’s revolutionary roots, ideological foundations, social and institutional innovations, and changing relationships with the United States and the former Soviet Union.

HIST 344 The Pacific Rim: Economic Dynamism and Challenge for America (4 Credits)

The Pacific Rim is the world’s most dynamic region, where the economic expansion of Japan, Taiwan, South Korea, Singapore, and Hong Kong is now matched by China and other Southeast Asian nations. Focus on historical and cultural sources of Asian economic strength, and opportunities and challenges presented to the United States. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 352 Africa and the Atlantic Slave Trade (4 Credits)

Examination of the central role of slavery and emancipation in the history of Africa and the Atlantic world from 1450–1900. While emphasizing the African experience, a consideration of the development of slave societies in the Americas will provide a comparative and more comprehensive view of the topic. 
Offered in alternate years.

HIST 354 Race and History in South Africa (4 Credits)

An exploration of the major developments in South Africa that led to the creation of apartheid or racial separation. African perceptions of European colonization, industrialization, urbanization, and land alienation are stressed. The course concludes with a look at the work of African nationalist leaders such as Mandela and Biko. 
Offered in alternate years.

HIST 360 Historical Problems (4 Credits)

In-depth treatment of selected topics in social, intellectual, economic, women’s, and ethnic history. Possible topics: debating change in the modern American West and issues in Chicano history. May be repeated for degree credit given a different topic. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 376 California Indian Seminar (4 Credits)

The result of combining ethnography and history into ethnohistory presents the Native American side of Indian-White relations in California. Using GIS tools of analysis and plotting permits mapping Indian movement in the mission system, revealing their agency and growing power in coping with European and American directed social change.

HIST 381 Mongol World Empire (4 Credits)

Research seminar on the Mongol Empire, which stretched from Korea to Hungary in the 13th and 14th centuries. Topics include pastoral nomadic origins; the life and legacy of Chinggis Khan; Mongol encounters with Chinese, Islamic, and Latin Christian societies; and the Mongols as brokers of cross-cultural exchange.
Offered as needed.

HIST 382 Religion and Politics in Iran (4 Credits)

This course examines the relationship between religious and political authority in Iran. Focus is on the modern period. Topics include traditional Persian kingship, Shi`i Islam, the Constitutional Revolution of 1905–1911, the CIA-led coup of 1953, the Iranian Revolution of 1978–1979, and life in the contemporary Islamic Republic. 
Offered as needed.

HIST 401 Advanced Reading Colloquium (2 Credits)

Opportunity for students and instructor(s) to examine a historical problem or body of literature in a small, collaborative setting. Topic is open to interests of participants. 
Prerequisite: by permission.

HIST 490 Capstone Research Seminar (4 Credits)

This course serves as the culmination of the major. Each student will plan, research, draft, revise, and complete an original research paper of 18 to 20 pages, reflecting advanced historiographical understanding and skill under the guidance and with the approval of department faculty. Content will be driven by student projects.
Prerequisite: prior coursework in the major and senior standing or by instructor permission.

HIST 499 Honors Thesis in History (2-4 Credits)

Students approved by the department continue the work done in HIST 490 to develop an extended, original Honors Thesis that seeks to break meaningful new ground in its research topic.