Health, Medicine, and Society 

Director 
James Krueger, Philosophy 

Advisory Committee 
Ben Aronson, Biology 
Kimberly Coles, Sociology and Anthropology 
Jessie Hewitt, History 
Caryl Forristall, Biology 
Celine Ko, Psychology 
Victoria Lewis, Theater 
Jennifer Nelson, Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies 
Lisa Olson, Biology 
Tim Seiber, Johnston 

The Program 
The Health, Medicine, and Society (HMS) program seeks to integrate coursework relevant to the field of medicine from across many disciplines. It is meant to serve students interested in a wide range of career paths, from medical provider (physician, nurse, physician assistant, midwife) to health care administrator, from public health to healthcare policy. The program is built upon the conviction that questions about health and healthcare can only be meaningfully addressed by integrating different disciplinary perspectives. Thus, it provides a framework for navigating a wide range of classes ensuring both breadth of exposure and depth of perspective. Students will devise a personal course of study within the structure laid out below. Due to the integrative and interdisciplinary nature of the program, all HMS students are strongly encouraged to consider making HMS a second major, expanding and enhancing a primary field of study. 

The program is structured around five broad areas. The first, Natural Science, covers basic biology and chemistry. Such disciplines provide an important foundation for our understanding of health, and our development of possible medical interventions and public health programs. The second, Medical Humanities, brings the interpretive and conceptual resources of philosophy, literature, religious studies and history to bear on our understanding of health and healthcare. They place illness within the broader context of lived experience, and help us to understand its ethical and existential import. The third, Policy and Management, recognizes the complex legal, political, and economic context that defines how we respond to health challenges. Courses in this area provide important skills for developing and analyzing health policy, and for managing complex healthcare organizations. The fourth, Person and Society, draws on the rich traditions of medical anthropology, sociology and psychology. Such fields help us to understand the complex social and personal forces that shape health and disease, and our responses to them. Finally, Global Health acknowledges the challenges and possibilities for tackling health problems on the global stage. Courses here aim to provide practical skills for working across cultures, and conceptual resources for understanding issues of deeply routed cultural significance.

In addition to this interdisciplinary focus, the HMS program is committed to healthcare as a form of service. The completion of an HMS degree requires a practical internship or service project as the foundation of the major capstone. 

The flexible, interdisciplinary nature of the program requires careful planning with an advisor. Students interested in the program are strongly encouraged to take the foundational seminar (HMS 100) at the first available opportunity, typically in the first year of studies. 

The Major 

Students declaring an HMS major will develop a course of study comprised of a minimum of 13 courses (a minimum of 48 credits). This will include an emphasis comprised of five courses addressing one of the five core areas defined by the program, and at least two courses in two additional areas. To ensure depth of study, a maximum of 5 100-level courses can count towards a student’s concentration and electives. As with all interdisciplinary majors, no more than 24 credits (6 courses) can come from any one department or discipline. 

All HMS majors are strongly encouraged to develop competency in a second language. This is of particular importance for students concentrating in the area of Global Health. 

Bachelor of Arts 
All HMS majors must complete the following requirements: 

Major Requirements (48 credits minimum) 

Foundation Course (4 credits)

HMS 100 Health, Medicine, and Society (4 Credits)

An introduction to the wide range of disciplinary perspectives that are relevant to understanding health, medicine, and their relationship with broader society. Students will learn to identify broad questions related to these themes, and work to identify the disciplines, and courses, that will help provide the tools necessary to answer them. 

Mathematical Methods (4 credits)

Take one of the following courses: 

MATH 111 Elementary Statistics with Applications (4 Credits)

Descriptive and inferential statistics for students from diverse fields. Distribution, correlation, probability, hypothesis testing, use of tables, and examination of the misuse of statistics and relation of statistics to vital aspects of life. Computer packages used as tools throughout the course.

POLI 202 Statistical Analysis and Mapping of Social Science Data (4 Credits)

Principles of hypothesis development and testing, strategies for making controlled comparisons, principles of statistical inference, and tests of statistical significance. Development and testing of important research questions using such prominent data sets as the General Social Survey and the National Election Series.

PSYC 250 Statistical Methods (4 Credits)

Introduction to the use of descriptive and inferential statistics in the collection of data and the interpretation of research in psychology and education. 
Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or by permission.

Concentration (20 credits) 
Take five courses addressing one of the areas below. 

Electives (16 credits) 
Take four courses, two addressing each of two further areas below. Both elective areas must differ from a student’s concentration area. 

Capstone (4 credits)

Complete the capstone sequence: 

HMS 300 Integrative Seminar I (2 Credits)

This is the first course in the HMS major capstone sequence. Students will report on their progress through the program, reflecting on lessons learned about health, medicine, and society. They will then develop and propose their service internship required to complete the program. 
Prerequisite: HMS 100.

HMS 400 Integrative Seminar II (2 Credits)

This is the final course in the HMS capstone sequence. Students will report on all aspects of their education, including their service internship, and reflect on lessons learned. The final, written report completes the capstone for the program.
Prerequisite: HMS 300.

Please note: HMS 300 should be completed at the end of a student’s junior year, and HMS 400 at the end of a student’s senior year. Students will design a practical service/internship plan in HMS 300, then reflect upon and integrate their service experience with their course of study in HMS 400 after that project is completed. The completion of a service/internship project is required to complete the capstone sequence. For more information, consult an advisor within the HMS program. 

Department Honors 
Students may apply for departmental honors in the fall of their senior year. Students must have a minimum 3.5 GPA in the major to apply. To complete the honors requirements, students must successfully defend an Honors Thesis in HMS. The defense committee shall be composed of at least two faculty members, one of whom shall be an advisory board member in the HMS program. 

Area Courses 
The following courses have been identified as addressing the five possible areas of study within the HMS program. Note that courses listed may have prerequisites. Additional courses not listed here may count as addressing each area. For more information, consult an advisor within the HMS program. 

Natural Science

BIOL 200 Principles of Biology: Unity and Diversity (4 Credits)

Introduction to the study of the diversity of living organisms and how organisms meet the challenges faced by all living things. Laboratory work emphasizes quantitative data collection and analysis while introducing students to biological diversity and physiological techniques.
Prerequisite: CHEM 131.

BIOL 201 Principles of Biology II: Molecular/Cellular Biology and Genetics (4 Credits)

Introduction to the study of life including molecules and biological processes, the structure of cells, and molecular and transmission genetics. Laboratory work emphasizes biochemical and genetic techniques, data collection and analysis. 
Prerequisite: CHEM 131 or by permission.

BIOL 239 Molecular Genetics and Heredity (4 Credits)

This course emphasizes the importance of molecular genetics in contemporary biology. Patterns of inheritance, gene structure and function, and techniques using recombinant DNA technology will be emphasized. Laboratory includes classical genetic analysis as well as molecular and biochemical techniques. 
Prerequisites: BIOL 200 and 201 (or BIOL 131 and BIOL 133).

BIOL 317 Human Anatomy (4 Credits)

In-depth study of the structure of the human body through lecture/discussions and laboratory exercises. Laboratories will involve examination of anatomical models and dissection of preserved specimens. Six hours lecture/ laboratory. Offered in alternate years. Students may not earn credit in both BIOL 317 and BIOL 337. 
Prerequisite: BIOL 238 (or BIOL 131 and BIOL 133). 
Numeric grade only.

BIOL 325 Medical Genetics (3-4 Credits)

Clinical aspects of genetic disease and current issues in medical genetics. Etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of genetic diseases; rare inheritance patterns (anticipation, imprinting); complex genetics (diabetes, obesity, mental illness, cancer); gene therapy; embryonic stem cells/ cloning; genetic counseling; ethics; and governmental legislation. Intensive writing and reading of primary literature. No laboratory. 
Prerequisite: BIOL 239. 
Offered as needed.

BIOL 326 Neuroscience (4 Credits)

Study of cellular/molecular mechanisms, anatomy, circuitry, and functions of the nervous system. Emphasis on clinical neurology and experimental methods. Includes topics such as the senses, movement, language, emotions, consciousness, and learning. The laboratory includes descriptive and hypothesis testing activities. Credit cannot be received for both BIOL 104 and BIOL 326. 
Prerequisites: BIOL 238 or BIOL 239 or PSYC 300. 
Offered as needed.

BIOL 332 Nutrition (4 Credits)

The physiology, biochemistry, and practical aspects of nutrition along with an examination of current controversial issues. Four-and-a-half hours of lecture. 
Prerequisites: BIOL 238 or BIOL 239. 
Offered as needed.

BIOL 338 Cell Biology (4 Credits)

Structure and function of cells, with emphasis on events outside the nucleus. Study of cytoskeleton, bioenergetics, intracellular communication, control of cell division, and sorting of proteins to appropriate organelles. Laboratory includes fluorescence microscopy, in vitro reconstitution of cellular processes, and subcellular fractionation. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory/discussion.
Prerequisite: BIOL 239. 
Offered in alternate years.

BIOL 343 Microbiology (4 Credits)

Study of microorganisms: their structure, taxonomy, metabolism, genetics, and interactions with humans. Laboratory includes cell culture, microbe isolation and identification, and bacterial genetics. Six hours lecture/laboratory.
Prerequisite: BIOL 239. 
Offered as needed.

BIOL 344 Human Physiology (4 Credits)

Functioning of the human body at the cellular, systems, and whole animal level. Emphasis on nervous, endocrine, renal, and cardiovascular systems and their interrelationships. Students may not earn credit for both BIOL 334 and BIOL 344. 
Prerequisites: BIOL 238 or BIOL 239. 
Offered as needed.

BIOL 345 Immunology (4 Credits)

Study of the physiological, molecular, and cellular basis of host defense. Emphasis will be on the human immune system and its pathogens. Diseases of the immune system, such as diabetes, multiple sclerosis, lupus, and AIDS will also be examined. 
Prerequisite: BIOL 239.

CDIS 100 Introduction to Communication Sciences and Disorders (4 Credits)

The typical processes of communication and a survey of the disorders that affect communication across the lifespan. The basics of observation, evaluation, treatment, research and other applications. Guest faculty lecturers in their areas of expertise support course lectures.

CHEM 102 Introduction to Chemistry of the Environment (4 Credits)

Introductory course for students wishing to explore the sciences or needing preparation for General Chemistry. Topics in chemistry relevant to the environment such as energy needs, pollution, and pesticides will be discussed. Three hours lecture. No background in chemistry is required. Recommended for non-science majors. 
Numeric grade only.

CHEM 131 General Chemistry (4 Credits)

Introduction to chemistry, including properties, structure, and reactivity of atoms and molecules, with concurrent laboratory. First semester covers fundamental concepts of atomic structure, stoichiometry, aqueous reactions, states of matter, molecular structure and bonding, and thermochemistry. Second semester emphasizes group projects in equilibrium, electrochemistry, thermodynamics, kinetics, inorganic synthesis, and spectroscopy. Fall: four hours lecture and three hours laboratory. Spring: seven hours laboratory and group learning. 
Prerequisites for CHEM 131: Placement into MATH 118 or higher math course OR prerequisite or co-requisite of MATH 002L or higher math course OR permission of chemistry department. 

CHEM 132 General Chemistry (4 Credits)

Introduction to chemistry, including properties, structure, and reactivity of atoms and molecules, with concurrent laboratory. First semester covers fundamental concepts of atomic structure, stoichiometry, aqueous reactions, states of matter, molecular structure and bonding, and thermochemistry. Second semester emphasizes group projects in equilibrium, electrochemistry, thermodynamics, kinetics, inorganic synthesis, and spectroscopy. Fall: four hours lecture and three hours laboratory. Spring: seven hours laboratory and group learning. 
Prerequisite for CHEM 132: Grade of 2.0 or higher in CHEM 131 or by permission.

CHEM 231 Organic Chemistry (4 Credits)

Chemistry of carbon-containing compounds; their structure, nomenclature, physical properties, spectroscopy (IR, GC-MS, NMR), stereochemistry, chemical reactivities, mechanisms of reaction, and synthesis. Four hours lecture and three hours laboratory. 
Prerequisite for CHEM 231: Grade of 2.0 or higher in CHEM 132.

CHEM 232 Organic Chemistry (4 Credits)

Chemistry of carbon-containing compounds; their structure, nomenclature, physical properties, spectroscopy (IR, GC-MS, NMR), stereochemistry, chemical reactivities, mechanisms of reaction, and synthesis. Four hours lecture and three hours laboratory. 
Prerequisite for CHEM 232: CHEM 231.

CHEM 312 Advanced Environmental Chemistry (4 Credits)

This course investigates environmental chemistry of local air, water, and soil systems, combined with mapping so that spatial trends can be observed. Global issues are also considered, allowing this knowledge base to be applied in multiple settings. Laboratory and fieldwork heavily based on EPA methods of sampling and chemical analysis. 
Prerequisite: CHEM 232, by permission only. 
Offered as needed.

CHEM 320 Biochemistry (4 Credits)

Study of the structure and function of biological molecules (including proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and lipids), enzymes, and metabolic pathways. Four hours lecture and three hours laboratory. 
Prerequisite: CHEM 232 or by permission.

Medical Humanities

Please note: MVC 260 Topics in Politics of Representation is also a 4 credit course option. Topic and availability vary per term. 

HIST 215 History of Disability (4 Credits)

This course examines the history of disability since 1500. Topics include the difference between early modern and modern understandings of sickness and health; the professionalization of medicine; disability and the nation-state; disability and modern warfare; eugenics in fascist and liberal societies; and the disability rights movement. 
Offered as needed. 
Numeric and Evaluation grade only. 

HIST 318 Gender and Sexuality in Modern European History (4 Credits)

This course examines the history of gender and sexuality in Europe since 1750. Topics include the influence of the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, and the Industrial Revolution on the development of the new gender ideals, the “invention” of sexuality, the links between gender and empire, and the long sexual revolution. 

 

PHIL 215 Bioethics: Doctors and Patients (4 Credits)

Examination of the ethical issues that arise within the relationship between doctors and patients. Topics include paternalism, autonomy, confidentiality, informed consent, and the conflicts that can arise in medical research. 
Numeric and Evaluation grade only. 
Offered in alternate years.

PHIL 216 Bioethics: Technology and Justice (4 Credits)

Examination of the ethical issues that arise from the distribution of health resources and the nature of particular procedures and technologies. Topics include fairness in rationing health resources, genetic screening, abortion, and end of life care. 
Numeric and Evaluation grade only. 
Offered in alternate years.

PHIL 231 Philosophy, Science, and Medicine (4 Credits)

Examination of basic issues in the philosophy of science as they apply to medicine. Topics include the nature of scientific evidence, explanation, causation, and causal inference. Examples will be drawn from epidemiology and the claims made by advocates for Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM). 
Numeric and Evaluation grade only. 
Offered in alternate years.

PHIL 232 Biology, Health, and Disease (4 Credits)

Examination of basic issues in the philosophy of biology through the lens of the concepts of health and disease. Addresses evolutionary theory and the nature of biological functions by examining evolutionary and functional accounts of health and disease. It also examines genetic explanations by exploring the nature of genetic disease. 
Numeric and Evaluation grade only. 
Offered in alternate years.

REL 250 Compassion (3-4 Credits)

Explores what it means to live a life of compassion through these lenses: 1) biographical models such as Gandhi, Nelson Mandela, The Dalai Lama, Mary Oliver, Viktor Frankl, and Mother Teresa; 2) the compassion teachings of the world’s religions; 3) the psychology of compassion ; 4) experiential investigation of compassion practices. 
Offered as needed. 
Numeric grade only.

WGS 232 History of Sexuality in the United States (4 Credits)

Explores the understandings of sexuality from the colonial period to the present, charting both the development of sexuality as a concept and the explosion of discussion about it. Topics include prostitution, rape, birth control, abortion, courting rituals, sexual revolution, women’s liberation, sexual identity, and campaigns for lesbian and gay rights. 
Offered in alternate years.

WGS 333 Pregnancy & Power: Reproductive Politics and Policies (4 Credits)

Women’s knowledge of their bodies, especially concerning sexuality and reproduction, is a primary issue for women’s well-being. This course focuses on current controversies over sexuality education, birth control, abortion, and related issues.

Policy and Management

BUS 305 Organizational Communication (4 Credits)

This course examines current methods and best practices for communicating in organizations. Topics include the communication process, business writing, presentation design and delivery, non-verbal communication, active listening, interpersonal skills, and employment communication. Special emphasis is placed on analyzing audiences, having clarity of purpose, and using proper format.

BUS 310 Principles of Management and Organization Behavior (4 Credits)

Dynamics of individual and group behavior are explored, in addition to selected topics of entrepreneurship, technology, and strategic planning. Students are asked to view the internal workings of organizations as well as to consider organizations in a larger, more global context. Classic and modern texts are used.
Prerequisites: BUS 136, ACCT 210, and junior standing or by permission.

BUS 312 Leadership (3-4 Credits)

Reflects the growing interest in leadership and the leadership process. Students explore the topic from multiple perspectives. Theory and myths are confronted as students search for their own path and assess their own unique styles. Students will also conduct original research, including posing and testing hypotheses. 
Prerequisite: sophomore standing or higher. 
Offered in alternate years.

ECON 101 Principles of Economics (4 Credits)

Introduction to the study of economic systems from a micro and macro perspective. The course includes economic principles underlying the process of consumption, production, and distribution in a market-oriented economy (microeconomics), and the structure, operation, measures, and major theoretical models of the whole economy (macroeconomics).

ECON 240 Economics of Race, Class, and Gender (4 Credits)

The economic position of women and minorities in society. Racial and sexual discrimination, women’s labor force participation, occupational segregation, domestic work, immigration of workers, and racial marginalization in market economies. Mediating influences such as education, spatial forces, and institutional and public policies. Gender/race relations in industrial/Third World countries.
Prerequisites: ECON 100 or ECON 101 or by permission. 
Offered in alternate years. 

ECON 254 Economics of the Public Sector (4 Credits)

This course looks at the economics of public expenditure and public revenue. Public expenditure: allocative role of federal, state, and local governments; social choice, provision of public goods and public policy to correct diseconomies such as pollution. Public revenue: Alternative forms of taxation and their impact on economic efficiency, equity, and growth.
Prerequisite: ECON 100 or ECON 101 or by permission. 
Offered in alternate years.

EVST 100 Introduction to Environmental Studies (4 Credits)

Overview of the major causes and consequences of pollution, natural resource depletion, and loss of biological diversity. The primary objective is to develop an interdisciplinary understanding of our natural environment, the human impacts that degrade it, and the measures we can take to protect and restore environmental quality.

EVST 235 Environmental Impact Assessment (4 Credits)

Comprehensive overview of environmental impact assessment. Federal and State legislative foundations governing the content and process of environmental review are examined. Culminates in preparation of an environmental impact report analyzing the potential impacts and mitigations. 
Prerequisite: EVST 100 and completion of a WA course.

EVST 242 Food and Nature (4 Credits)

Examines the ways production, trade, and consumption of food affects workers, consumers, and ecosystems. Topics include the political economy of food systems, genetically modified food, biofuels, the carbon footprints, the modern meat system, and potential solutions such as fair trade, organic certification, the slow food movement, and local food. 
Prerequisite: EVST 100 recommended.

LAST 431 “Drug Wars” in the Americas (4 Credits)

Exploration of the social control of drug use, both formal and informal focusing on the Americas. The historic and contemporary development of U.S. drug laws is a focus as is international cooperation and policies that deal with controlled substances. We look at ways drugs, drug distribution and consumption are molded by our cultural practices and, in turn, how they help construct our ever-changing vision of culture, particularly in an increasingly global society.
Prerequisite: LAST 101 or SOAN 100 or SOAN 102 or POLI 111 or POLI 123. Offered as needed. Not open to students who have received credit for SOAN 431.

 

PLCY 100 Introduction to Public Policy Analysis (4 Credits)

Introduction to both the theoretical foundations and processes of public policy-making. Case studies of educational policy, health care policy, economic policy, and/or tax policies.

POLI 457 Health Care Policy (4 Credits)

Examination of the U.S. health care system, including the evolution and impact of Medicare, Medicaid, and the SCHIP programs. Comparison of effectiveness of the U.S. healthcare system with other systems around the world. Examination of recent attempts to reform the U.S. health care system and their likely impacts. 
Prerequisite: PLCY 100 or POLI 111, and POLI 202. 
Offered in alternate years.

REST 335 Race, Gender and Public Policy (4 Credits)

This class explores the connection between race, gender and public policy making in America, past and present. We will focus on specific case studies of welfare systems, foster care, housing or criminal justice systems, and explore race and gender inequalities. 
Offered in alternate years.

SPA 110 Introduction to Spatial Analysis and GIS (4 Credits)

Introduction to concepts of spatial analysis and geographic information systems (GIS). Emphasis on spatial reasoning and analysis. Topics include the spatial data models, data requirements and acquisition, spatial analysis using GIS, implementation within an organization, and especially the application of GIS to problem-solving in other disciplines. 

Person and Society

PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology (4 Credits)

Survey of classic and contemporary theory and research in human and animal behavior. Topics include the biopsychological bases of behavior, learning, cognition, motivation, developmental and social processes, and psychological disorders and their treatment.

PSYC 220 Abnormal Child Psychology (4 Credits)

Nature, determinants, and problems associated with Intellectual and Learning Disabilities, Conduct and Behavioral Disorders, Anxiety, and Mood Disorders, Autism Spectrum Disorder, and Physical Disorders in children. 
Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or by permission.

PSYC 320 Psychology of Gender (4 Credits)

Survey of biological, psychological, and sociocultural issues relevant to the psychology of gender. Emphasis on cultural images of men, women, and children; gender differences and similarities; gender-role socialization; sexuality and reproduction; psychological adjustment; and interpersonal relations. 
Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or by permission.

PSYC 335 Developmental Psychology (4 Credits)

Survey of normal developmental patterns from infancy to old age and theories of development with emphasis on current literature. 
Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or by permission.

PSYC 344 Abnormal Psychology (4 Credits)

Survey of current theories of abnormal behavior with emphasis on the role of the psychologist in diagnosis, research, and treatment, as well as an understanding of the ethical and societal concerns related to psychiatric and behavioral disorders. 
Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or by permission.

PSYC 350 Evolutionary Psychology (4 Credits)

The evolution of social behavior is the primary focus of this course. The first few weeks will be devoted to the study of evolutionary theory as it applies to behavior. We will cover parental care, parent-offspring conflict, sexual selection, sex differences, sexuality, altruism, and cooperation.
Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or by permission.

PSYC 450 Health Psychology (4 Credits)

Provides an overview of the field of health psychology. We will cover the history of health psychology, the major theories of the field, and the methods of applying health psychology knowledge to promoting health and preventing diseases. We will be focusing on individual, social, cultural, and economic factors in health. 
Prerequisites: PSYC 100, and PSYC 250, and PSYC 300.

REST 220 Ending Oppression (3 Credits)

Students will learn the theory and practice of Re-Evaluation Counseling and use the peer counseling tool to examine how various forms of oppression appear in society and impact their lives. May be repeated for degree credit for a maximum of 6 credits.
Prerequisite: by permission of instructor. 

REST 245 Race and Science (4 Credits)

This course examines the last 200 years of the scientific study of race in Western Europe and the United States. A historical approach is taken through studies of contemporary issues which will be examined with the unique perspective that the historical analysis allows.

SOAN 230 Bodies and Society (4 Credits)

This course is an introduction to sociological thought about human bodies and their relationships to culture and society. We will place bodies at the center of our analysis, exploring their crucial sociocultural dimensions and critically examining the notion that the only disciplines fit to study bodies are biology and medicine.

SOAN 329 Anthropology of Mothering (4 Credits)

This course will examine concepts of motherhood and how practices of mothering are culturally created, upheld, and naturalized in various societies. Topics addressed include breastfeeding, mothering and sexuality, single mothering, adoption, medical technologies, surrogate mothers, lesbian mothers, trans-racial mothers, teen mothers, and more. 
Prerequisite: SOAN 100, or SOAN 102, or SOAN 104; and junior standing plus two SOAN courses at the 200 level or above; or by permission. 
Offered as needed.

SOAN 326 Charity and Helping Others: Humanitarian Assistance (4 Credits)

Explores the history, animating ideals, and contemporary paradoxes of humanitarian action. Analyzes humanitarianism in the context of globalization, assessing its limits and possibilities with particular interest in its social and cultural relations: sovereignty, the ethics of giving care and bearing witness, the “aid business,” and the role of the media. 
Prerequisite: an SE or CC LAF or by permission.

SOAN 342 Gender and Sexuality (4 Credits)

Gender and sexuality in various cultural areas around the world, and consideration of the significance and implications of gender and sexuality in the social life of these people, while introducing current theoretical issues in the cross-cultural study of gender and sexuality.
Prerequisite: SOAN 100, or SOAN 102, or by permission. 
Offered as needed.

SOAN 418 Death and Dying (4 Credits)

The objective of this course is to examine societal and personal issues regarding the process of dying and death. A major emphasis will be on increasing the depth and dimensions of self-reflection in the face of conflicting ideas, sentiments, values, and "facts" of death. 
Prerequisite: SOAN 100, or SOAN 102, or SOAN 104; two SOAN courses at the 200 level or above; two 300 or 400 level SOAN courses, and senior standing; or by permission. 
Offered as needed.

Global Health

BUS 136 Principles of Global Marketing (4 Credits)

Marketing concepts with emphasis on marketing management. Explores marketing strategies involving the variables of the marketing mix (product, pricing, promotion, and distribution), coordinated and integrated across multiple country markets. Examines the distinctive differences, influences, and issues faced by companies when conducting marketing activities in the domestic and global environment.

GLB 336 International Business (4 Credits)

Examines the relationship of world, regional, and national institutions and cultures to businesses operating within their environments. The major trading blocs of NAFTA and the European Union are studied, as well as the nature of trade and business with and within China, Japan, Mexico, and the European Union.
Prerequisites: GLB 228 and junior standing or by permission.

GLB 453 International Negotiations (3-4 Credits)

Intended to introduce students to the fundamentals of negotiation and to create awareness of critical cultural points in international negotiations. Lenses through which the process will be viewed include the individual entrepreneur, small companies, major corporations, and that of a customer.
Prerequisites: BUS 226 or GLB 228, or by permission.
Recommended: GLB 336.

CDIS 260 Latin America: Focus on Language, Culture, and Education (3 Credits)

This travel course uses experiential learning, self-reflection, reading, writing, and discussion to provide students with a foundation for understanding cross-cultural differences in language and education. Students work with children in community-based educational programs, focusing on language-development issues (e.g., bilingualism, literacy, and the broad impact of difficulties with language on education). Open to non-majors. Previous coursework in Spanish is strongly recommended. 
Offered as needed.

ECON 221 Economics of Development (4 Credits)

Development theories grounded in the development patterns of Western and Eastern Europe, North America, Latin America, Australia, and Southeastern Asia. Issues of development and income distribution, population growth, and countries’ cultural and economic openness. Comparison of development and growth theory. 
Prerequisites: ECON 100 or ECON 101 or by permission.
Offered in alternate years.

ECON 222 International Political Economy (4 Credits)

Study of the dialogue between scholarship and practice in economics and political science on the three broad topics: the political economy of international trade, international financial relations, and development. The primary focus is on the reciprocal interactions among markets, social forces, and political objectives that shape the international political-economic system.
Prerequisite: ECON 100 or ECON 101, or by permission. 
Offered in alternate years. 

PHIL 122 Global Medical Ethics (3 Credits)

Service course focusing on public health challenges in the developing world, in particular, the continuing HIV pandemic in southern Africa. One week of coursework on campus lays the foundation for three weeks of service work in the Kingdom of Swaziland. 
Credit/no credit and Evaluation grade only.

POLI 345 International Law and Organization (4 Credits)

Various forms of the quest for world order, emphasizing issues of international law and the structure and functioning of intergovernmental organizations, including the United Nations. 
Prerequisite: POLI 123 or IR 200, or instructor permission.

PSYC 252 Culture and Human Behavior (4 Credits)

This course focuses on the role of culture in human behavior. Attention is given to (1) the conceptual, ethical, and methodological challenges involved in making cross-cultural comparisons, (2) understanding how psychological inquiry is informed by a cultural perspective, and (3) applying psychological principles in order to understand and improve intercultural interaction. 
Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or by permission. 
Note: Students who receive credit for this course may not receive credit for PSYC 435 Cross-Cultural Psychology.

PSYC 435 Cross-Cultural Psychology (4 Credits)

The methods and issues involved in cross-cultural psychology. The first half is an exploration of cross-cultural methodology and an examination of the universality of psychological theory. The second half is a focus on how knowledge about cultural differences has been applied to situations of intercultural contact. 
Prerequisites: PSYC 100, and PSYC 250, and PSYC 300, or by permission.
Note: Students who receive credit for this course may not receive credit for PSYC 252, Culture and Human Behavior.

REL 125 Introduction to World Religions (4 Credits)

By studying major religious traditions of the world, students will consider how religious traditions guide the way people live their lives in an ever increasingly diverse and religiously pluralistic world. Investigations will include both historical studies and the writings of religious traditions.

SOAN 102 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (4 Credits)

Introduction to the anthropological perspective in viewing personal, social, and cultural events in human life. Attention given to evolutionary and comparative ways of describing, analyzing, and interpreting ways of life from a cross-cultural perspective.

SOAN 301 Fieldwork and Ethnographic Methods (4 Credits)

Examination of the nature of ethnography and the application of fieldwork methods for the development of an ethnography. Emphasis on practicing the method of participant observation for data formulation. Ethical and methodological issues of fieldwork are examined. 
Prerequisites: SOAN 100, or SOAN 102, or SOAN 104; and two SOAN courses at the 200 level or above; or by permission. 
Offered as needed.

SOAN 303 World Ethnographies (4 Credits)

Students gain a thorough understanding of the central methodological paradigms of anthropologists: participant observation. Students have the chance to deconstruct a number of full-length ethnographies with an eye toward comparing and contrasting the research methods and writing styles of various contemporary anthropologists. 
Prerequisites: SOAN 100, SOAN 102, or SOAN 104; and two SOAN courses at the 200 level or above; or by permission.
Offered as needed.

Course Descriptions (HMS)

HMS 100 Health, Medicine, and Society (4 Credits)

An introduction to the wide range of disciplinary perspectives that are relevant to understanding health, medicine, and their relationship with broader society. Students will learn to identify broad questions related to these themes, and work to identify the disciplines, and courses, that will help provide the tools necessary to answer them. 

HMS 300 Integrative Seminar I (2 Credits)

This is the first course in the HMS major capstone sequence. Students will report on their progress through the program, reflecting on lessons learned about health, medicine, and society. They will then develop and propose their service internship required to complete the program. 
Prerequisite: HMS 100.

HMS 400 Integrative Seminar II (2 Credits)

This is the final course in the HMS capstone sequence. Students will report on all aspects of their education, including their service internship, and reflect on lessons learned. The final, written report completes the capstone for the program.
Prerequisite: HMS 300.