Global Business 

The Faculty 
Heung-joo Cha
Faisal Harahap
Walter Hutchens
Jack Osborn

The Major

Bachelor of Science in Global Business

The Global Business Department offers a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Global Business. Though one of the youngest departments on campus, we are among the University’s most distinguished programs—distinguished in terms of the career success of our graduates, support from alumni and donors, and recognition from on and off-campus entities, e.g. the J.W. Fulbright awards.

Global Business graduates have been hired by a litany of major publicly traded firms, been accepted to many of the world’s most prestigious graduate schools, and launched successful careers as entrepreneurs, public servants or professionals in non-governmental, not-for-profit organizations. They have done these things both within the United States and abroad. Almost half of the University of Redlands’ 21 recipients of the United States government’s J.W. Fulbright Award have been Global Business majors.

If you choose to major in Global Business, we want you to travel, master at least one language besides English (not just perfunctorily study another language for a few semesters, but really become proficient with it), and deeply study the history and current conditions of a country or region other than the United States. We also pride ourselves on being a rigorous program that attracts many talented, hardworking students.

Thus, among the key distinctive features of the Global Business program are that we do not merely suggest but actually require that our majors: 1) study abroad for at least a semester, 2) complete at least three years (six semesters) of university-level study of a foreign language (or demonstrate equivalent competence), and 3) take courses focused on places outside of the United States. We also have GPA requirements for entry into the program and degree completion that are higher than University norms. Students are strongly encouraged to take Calculus I. 

Global Business is presented as a process of understanding how cultures and political systems manage their economies, and the rules and procedures that nations create to permit and encourage businesses to operate within their borders. To understand foreign business situations, an emphasis is placed on developing knowledge of and sensitivity to the language, cultural, and political climates of host countries.

The major in Global Business prepares students for a career in international business, public, and not-for-profit service, as well as graduate study in a number of disciplines including law, finance, business, and government.

Global Business Department classes (GLB) may be taken towards the major based upon prerequisites or with the permission of the instructor. All classes, prerequisites, core courses, and advanced electives, must have an overall cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher to fulfill the requirements for the Global Business degree.

In order to enroll in Global Business 228, students must have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher at the time of registration or the permission of the department chair, including first semester students. Transfer students must have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0 from their previous school(s) at the time of registration. In addition, any student seeking to declare a major in Global Business must have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0 at the time they submit their Declaration of Major. (Those students interested in the Accounting, Business Administration, or Management majors should refer to the specific Accounting Department’s section or Business Administration and Management Department’s section of this Catalog.)

Students who do not meet the GPA requirements as noted above may petition the Global Business Department for permission to enroll in Global Business 228 or to declare the major. Petitions will be reviewed by the Global Business Department Chair, and will be granted only in exceptionally compelling circumstances.

Learning Outcomes for the Global Business Program Include: 

1. Demonstrate competency through the 302-level in written and verbal
    communication in a second language.
2. Identify and understand the challenges and opportunities of operating a
     business or non-governmental organization in international settings.
3. Utilize critical thinking to produce sound strategic decisions by
     identifying, comparing, and contrasting how foreign and domestic
     businesses formulate strategies and operate globally.
4. Develop a capacity to meaningfully evaluate a company's (or non
     profit's) performance with the application of appropriate financial and
     statistical techniques, and accounting methods.
5. Demonstrate an interdisciplinary knowledge of at least one other region
     of the world outside of the United States.
6. Develop a critical understanding of the foundations and varieties of
     capitalism around the world and understand their impact on current
     business practices.
7. Utilize verbal communication skills to engage an audience with a
     coherent, persuasive research presentation.
8. Accurately apply research and written communication skills to produce
     in-depth written analyses of course readings and/or cases.
9. Accurately assess the global operations and challenges of an
     individually assigned, internationally active, major company during a
     semester-long analysis, in order to provide intelligent, informed
     recommendations to strategic issues. These assignments will be found
     in GLB 228 Globalization, GLB 336 International Business, and GLB
     459 Global Business Policy and Strategy, as well as other courses.

Students are encouraged to develop a geographic area of emphasis or concentration through interdisciplinary study. Linked to the academic study of issues and practices are the requirements that students become proficient in a second language and that they study abroad for at least one full semester. Approval from the Global Business Department Chair is required for all interdisciplinary and overseas- study aspects of the degree.

Learning outcomes for this program may be found here

Requirements

Prerequisite Course (8 courses/ 32 credits)

We advise students to complete the majority of their prerequisite courses no later than the spring of their sophomore year. GLB 228 should be taken early, in the first academic year, if possible, followed by GLB 240 U.S. Business Law. Transfer students must take GLB 228 in their first semester, unless exempted, in writing, by the chair. All prerequisite courses must be taken for a numerical grade and students must earn a minimum grade of 3.0 in each course.

The following courses are prerequisites to the required major courses. Substitutions to these requirements can be made only with the written approval of the Department Chair. Some also satisfy Liberal Arts Foundation (LAI) requirements.

Please note, students may take any ECON 200-level or higher course, or any other international course from any discipline at the 300-level or higher. 

BUS 136 Principles of Global Marketing (4 Credits)

Marketing concepts with emphasis on marketing management. Explores marketing strategies involving the variables of the marketing mix (product, pricing, promotion, and distribution), coordinated and integrated across multiple country markets. Examines the distinctive differences, influences, and issues faced by companies when conducting marketing activities in the domestic and global environment.

ECON 101 Principles of Economics (4 Credits)

Introduction to the study of economic systems from a micro and macro perspective. The course includes economic principles underlying the process of consumption, production, and distribution in a market-oriented economy (microeconomics), and the structure, operation, measures, and major theoretical models of the whole economy (macroeconomics).

GLB 228 Globalization (4 Credits)

Traces the evolution of capitalism in the United States, China, Japan, and Europe, reviewing varying cultural and political approaches which create varied economic models. Students will explore the issues of doing business in each of the above-named nations or groups through analysis of an assigned company.

GLB 240 U.S. Business Law (4 Credits)

An introduction to the American legal system, our constitutional framework, the role of judicial decisions, and statutory law. Special emphasis is placed on business torts and contract law, along with other concepts important in the business world. 
Prerequisite: BUS 226 or GLB 228 or by permission.
Not open to students who have completed BUS 240.

POLI 202 Statistical Analysis and Mapping of Social Science Data (4 Credits)

Principles of hypothesis development and testing, strategies for making controlled comparisons, principles of statistical inference, and tests of statistical significance. Development and testing of important research questions using such prominent data sets as the General Social Survey and the National Election Series.

MATH 111 Elementary Statistics with Applications (4 Credits)

Descriptive and inferential statistics for students from diverse fields. Distribution, correlation, probability, hypothesis testing, use of tables, and examination of the misuse of statistics and relation of statistics to vital aspects of life. Computer packages used as tools throughout the course.

ACCT 210 Principles of Financial Accounting and Reporting (4 Credits)

Financial accounting and reporting concepts and procedures that provide a history of economic activity, resources, obligations. Emphasis is on preparing and using financial information at an enterprise level. 
Prerequisites: ECON 101.

ACCT 220 Principles of Managerial Accounting (4 Credits)

Analysis of financial and relevant non-financial information used in planning, motivating, evaluating, and control. Economic and behavioral concepts and quantitative techniques are integrated throughout. Topics: cost behavior, budgeting, analysis of variance, performance measurement, and pricing. 
Prerequisites: ACCT 210.

Core Courses: 10 courses/ 40 credits

Please note that the core course requirements include the following: students may choose between BUS 310 or BUS 410. Two additional GLB 300 or 400 series Advanced International Business courses (3–4 credits; includes study abroad course). Two International Courses - at least two International courses chosen from the following areas: Economics, Environmental Studies, History, Political Science, Art, Asian Studies, Latin American Studies, Psychology, International Relations, Sociology and Anthropology, or Religion; at the 300-level or above. The department is open to International courses from other disciplines, subject to relevance.

BUS 310 Principles of Management and Organization Behavior (4 Credits)

Dynamics of individual and group behavior are explored, in addition to selected topics of entrepreneurship, technology, and strategic planning. Students are asked to view the internal workings of organizations as well as to consider organizations in a larger, more global context. Classic and modern texts are used.
Prerequisites: BUS 136, ACCT 210, and junior standing or by permission.

BUS 410 Organizational Consulting (2-4 Credits)

An advanced management class that places student teams in organizational settings solving real client challenges. Students use conventional and design thinking processes to develop strategy for connecting with stakeholders, improve operations, and collect research key to decision making. Students are needed from across the college to make this class a success.
Prerequisite: BUS 310 recommended.

GLB 336 International Business (4 Credits)

Examines the relationship of world, regional, and national institutions and cultures to businesses operating within their environments. The major trading blocs of NAFTA and the European Union are studied, as well as the nature of trade and business with and within China, Japan, Mexico, and the European Union.
Prerequisites: GLB 228 and junior standing or by permission.

GLB 353 Financial Management (4 Credits)

Study of financial planning and analysis, taxation, capital budgeting, risk and cost of capital, cash flow analysis, management of working capital and long-term funds, dividend policy, and valuation. Prerequisites: ACCT 220 and ECON 101, and one course from POLI 202, MATH 111, or PSYC 250. Not open to students who have received credit for BUS 353.

GLB 356 International Finance (4 Credits)

This course explores the characteristics of international financial markets and examines various aspects of international financial management. Topics include international flow of funds, foreign exchange risk management, international investment analysis, international financial markets, operations of multinational firms, and international trade finance.

GLB 457 Strategic Issues in Global Business (4 Credits)

Selected current topics and their impact on business operations are explored in depth. This course emphasizes the need for businesses to closely monitor and develop both an understanding and sensitivity to major social, cultural, environmental, and political issues.
Prerequisites: senior standing, global business major or by permission.

GLB 459 Business Policy and Strategy for Bachelor of Science Majors (4 Credits)

Capstone course requiring students to integrate their knowledge of finance, law, accounting, and organizational and behavioral studies, and apply these topics to the development of business strategies in national and global contexts.
Prerequisites: GLB 240, GLB 350, ACCT 220, GLB 353 or ACCT 315 (which can be taken concurrently), GLB 336, or other approved course or by permission.

Additional Requirements
• If no second ECON course, then one more international elective at the
   300-400 level, is required.
• Study Abroad: Minimum of one semester abroad, with additional study
    abroad recommended and supported by the department.
• Language proficiency: Testing placement at the entry point to the 400
    level of a foreign language by graduation. This means the student will
    have completed the 302-level course with at least a grade of 3.0 in the
    final semester, or the equivalent. For languages not found in the UR
    Catalog offering, including Arabic, students must provide appropriate
    documentation to the Department Chair.
• Foreign-language study: All students must take at least 8 credits of a
   foreign language. Students who are already proficient may take the
   required 8 credits either in the language(s) in which they are proficient or
   in another language.
• The expectation of the major is that students will take at least 8 credits of
   language relevant to their area of concentration.

Optional: For Honors Eligibility

Please note that students may take MATH 120 or MATH 121 or MATH 118 and MATH 119.

MATH 120 is strongly recommended for all Global Business Majors but is required ONLY for Global Business Majors seeking Honors.

MATH 121 Calculus I (4 Credits)

Functions and their graphs; successive approximation and limits; local linearity and differentiation; applications of differentiation to graphing and optimization; and the definite integral, antiderivatives, and differential equations. 
Prerequisite: Permission based on Mathematics Placement Exam. 

MATH 118 Integrated Calculus I (4 Credits)

For students whose programs require calculus but who, based on their background and placement examination scores, are not prepared for MATH 121. Topics from precalculus include properties of linear, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; and compositions, transformations, and inverses of these functions. Calculus topics include successive approximation and limits of functions; local linearity and differentiation; applications of differentiation to graphing and optimization; and the definite integral, antiderivatives, and differential equations.
Prerequisite: MATH 002L or Math Placement at MATH 118 level or by permission.

MATH 119 Integrated Calculus II (4 Credits)

For students whose programs require calculus but who, based on their background and placement examination scores, are not prepared for MATH 121. Topics from precalculus include properties of linear, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; and compositions, transformations, and inverses of these functions. Calculus topics include successive approximation and limits of functions; local linearity and differentiation; applications of differentiation to graphing and optimization; and the definite integral, antiderivatives, and differential equations.
Prerequisite: MATH 118 or by permission.

Emphasis within the Major
Global Business majors may elect to have a formal emphasis within the major. Currently, these are available for Europe, Latin America, and China.

For a Global Business – China emphasis, students must be approved by the Department, and:
1. Demonstrate Mandarin proficiency at the end-of-fourth-year level by
    passing CHNS 402 (or equivalent class, as approved by the Global
    Business Department) or by otherwise demonstrating equivalent
    language proficiency to the satisfaction of the Global Business
    Department;
2. Study abroad in a substantially Chinese-speaking location [for at least a
     semester];
3. Complete five classes about China that are approved by the Global
     Business program.

The five China-focused classes may consist of:

Please note that students must take: GLB 300 level: Government and Business in China, GLB 300 level: China’s Legal System, GLB 360 Topics in Global Business, GLB 300 level: China’s Financial System, GLB 460 Topics in Global Business, GLB May Term or other GLB study abroad program to greater China, or other relevant courses as approved by the Department Chair. 

GLB 188 China: An Introduction (4 Credits)

China is among the most significant countries in the world, yet too few people know enough about it. Students in this course diminish that gap by learning about China’s enormous successes, challenges, complexity, and global impact. Focus is on business and economic issues, richly contextualized with background on China’s history, politics, geography, languages, and cultures. 

HIST 343 China since 1949 (4 Credits)

The People’s Republic of China has undertaken some of the most spectacular social experiments the world has ever witnessed. Examination of the P.R.C.’s revolutionary roots, ideological foundations, social and institutional innovations, and changing relationships with the United States and the former Soviet Union.

China-focused classes taken while abroad or at other accredited universities, or internships in China, subject to approval by the Global Business Department (which in most cases is readily granted; students typically complete some of the required international courses while abroad).

For a Global Business – Europe emphasis, students must be approved by the Department and:
1. Demonstrate proficiency in French, German, or Spanish to the 402-level
    (completing 402 or its equivalent), or any other accepted European
    language as approved by the Department.
2. Study abroad in a European nation for at least a semester.
3. Complete five classes about European topics, approved by the Global
      Business Department.

The five European classes may consist of:

Please note the following courses must be taken: GLB 460 and GLB 360 Topics in Global Business or other relevant courses as approved by the Department Chair. 

GLB 450 The European Union (4 Credits)

Focuses on European institutions and the conduct of business within the Union, beginning with the 1991 Maastricht Treaty. The impact of anti-trust policy and trade relations with the United States is followed closely.
Prerequisite: junior standing or by permission. 

GLB 453 International Negotiations (3-4 Credits)

Intended to introduce students to the fundamentals of negotiation and to create awareness of critical cultural points in international negotiations. Lenses through which the process will be viewed include the individual entrepreneur, small companies, major corporations, and that of a customer.
Prerequisites: BUS 226 or GLB 228, or by permission.
Recommended: GLB 336.

POLI 346 Foreign Policies of Russia and the Former Soviet States (4 Credits)

The first part of the course is an overview of the Soviet Union’s foreign policy from 1917–1991. The second part is an examination of the international ramifications of the break-up of the Soviet Union and discusses the diverse foreign policy objectives (and circumstances) of the newly independent states of the former Soviet Union, concentrating on Russia. 
Prerequisites: A Comparative Politics and International Relations course.

Europe-focused classes taken while abroad or at other accredited universities, or internships in a European nation, subject to approval by the Global Business Department (which in most cases is readily granted; students typically complete some of the required international courses while abroad).

For a Global Business – Latin America emphasis, students must be approved by the Department and:
1. Demonstrate proficiency in Spanish or Portuguese to the 402-level
    (completing 402 or its equivalent),
2. Study abroad in any Latin American country
3. Complete five classes about Latin American topics, approved by the
    Global Business Department.

The five Latin America classes may consist of:

Please note that student must take the following courses: GLB 360 and GLB 460 Topics in Global Business or other relevant courses as approved by the Department Chair. 

SPAN 425 Spanish-American Civilization (4 Credits)

Geography, history, art, literature, and society of Spanish-American lands. Class discussion and oral and written reports required. 
Prerequisite: SPAN 302, placement exam, or by permission.
Offered in alternate years.

SPAN 426 Survey of Spanish-American Literature (4 Credits)

Development of Spanish-American literature from the pre-Columbian to the present day. Emphasis on relating literary works to historical events and cultural values. 
Prerequisite: SPAN 302, placement exam, or by permission. 
Offered in alternate years.

SPAN 440 Spanish-American Narrative (4 Credits)

Contemporary novelists from early beginnings to present day. Addresses principal political and social Latin American problems. 
Prerequisite: SPAN 302, placement exam, or by permission.
Offered in alternate years.

Latin America-focused classes taken while abroad or at other accredited universities, or internships in a Latin American nation, subject to approval by the Global Business Department (which in most cases is readily granted; students typically complete some of the required international courses while abroad).

Internships
The department encourages all Global Business juniors and seniors to consider internships as opportunities to enhance their academic program. Internships allow students to explore career possibilities and integrate classroom learning with practical experience. Students should contact their faculty advisors for more information. To receive academic credit for any business internship, students must complete an organizational and industry audit as defined by the professor advising this activity or an equivalent activity within their overseas study programs.

Study Abroad
Study abroad greatly enhances the undergraduate experience for all Global Business students. The department requires one semester, minimum, of study abroad as well as advance planning for doing so. Early consultation with your Global Business advisor will allow for meaningful integration of one’s international and university studies.

Travel Abroad
The faculty regularly offers May Term travel courses to Asia and Europe. These courses expose students to both cultural and business issues through interaction with government officials, industry leaders, and scholars. Cultural and industrial site visits are extensive.

Departmental Honors
Honors will be awarded to all students who have met the following criteria: 
• A cumulative GPA of 3.7 or higher in the major, including prerequisites
    and electives counted towards the major,
• Completion of a 400-level course in a language other than English, or
    equivalent, 
• MATH 120 Brief Calculus (4) or MATH 121 Calculus I (4) or MATH 118
    Integrated Calculus I AND MATH 119 Integrated Calculus II (8),
• Completion of the Global Business Capstone (GLB 459) with at least a
    3.0.

Course Descriptions (GLB)

Please note: Topics in Global Business courses are listed as follows: 160, 260, 360, 460. Topics and course descriptions may vary upon term. Credits range from 2-4 per course. 

GLB 188 China: An Introduction (4 Credits)

China is among the most significant countries in the world, yet too few people know enough about it. Students in this course diminish that gap by learning about China’s enormous successes, challenges, complexity, and global impact. Focus is on business and economic issues, richly contextualized with background on China’s history, politics, geography, languages, and cultures. 

GLB 228 Globalization (4 Credits)

Traces the evolution of capitalism in the United States, China, Japan, and Europe, reviewing varying cultural and political approaches which create varied economic models. Students will explore the issues of doing business in each of the above-named nations or groups through analysis of an assigned company.

GLB 240 U.S. Business Law (4 Credits)

An introduction to the American legal system, our constitutional framework, the role of judicial decisions, and statutory law. Special emphasis is placed on business torts and contract law, along with other concepts important in the business world. 
Prerequisite: BUS 226 or GLB 228 or by permission.
Not open to students who have completed BUS 240.

GLB 336 International Business (4 Credits)

Examines the relationship of world, regional, and national institutions and cultures to businesses operating within their environments. The major trading blocs of NAFTA and the European Union are studied, as well as the nature of trade and business with and within China, Japan, Mexico, and the European Union.
Prerequisites: GLB 228 and junior standing or by permission.

GLB 353 Financial Management (4 Credits)

Study of financial planning and analysis, taxation, capital budgeting, risk and cost of capital, cash flow analysis, management of working capital and long-term funds, dividend policy, and valuation. Prerequisites: ACCT 220 and ECON 101, and one course from POLI 202, MATH 111, or PSYC 250. Not open to students who have received credit for BUS 353.

GLB 356 International Finance (4 Credits)

This course explores the characteristics of international financial markets and examines various aspects of international financial management. Topics include international flow of funds, foreign exchange risk management, international investment analysis, international financial markets, operations of multinational firms, and international trade finance.

GLB 387 China's Business Environment (3 Credits)

A travel course to China. Students gain direct exposure to one of the world’s most vibrant and consequential business environments. Participants visit foreign-invested enterprises, government offices, and prominent local firms. They encounter individuals on the front lines of China’s development.

GLB 421 Corporate Finance (4 Credits)

This course studies financial management in the corporate setting at an advanced level. Topics include the firm’s investment and financing decisions, capital budgeting analysis, investment analysis under uncertainty, the cost of capital, capital structure theory, dividend policy, and other current topics in finance.
Prerequisite: GLB 353 or ACCT 310 or by permission. Not open to students who have received credit for BUS 421.

GLB 422 Investments (4 Credits)

The course examines investment analysis and portfolio management through the study of the nature and functioning of securities markets, alternative investment opportunities, valuation of stock, fixed income securities, derivative securities.

GLB 450 The European Union (4 Credits)

Focuses on European institutions and the conduct of business within the Union, beginning with the 1991 Maastricht Treaty. The impact of anti-trust policy and trade relations with the United States is followed closely.
Prerequisite: junior standing or by permission. 

GLB 451 Government and Business in China (4 Credits)

Examines the evolution of economic and political reforms beginning with the rise of Deng Xiaoping in 1976. Hong Kong’s integration, relationship with Taiwan, rise of Shanghai, state-owned enterprises, and foreign direct investment are considered in the context of foreign corporations conducting business in China.
Prerequisites: Junior standing or by permission.
Numeric grading only.

GLB 452 Japanese Corporations and Global Business (4 Credits)

Covers operating styles in the management of Japanese firms, the relationship of major Japanese corporations to the Government of Japan, and the direct investment of Japanese firms in both developed and developing nations.
Prerequisite: junior standing.

GLB 453 International Negotiations (3-4 Credits)

Intended to introduce students to the fundamentals of negotiation and to create awareness of critical cultural points in international negotiations. Lenses through which the process will be viewed include the individual entrepreneur, small companies, major corporations, and that of a customer.
Prerequisites: BUS 226 or GLB 228, or by permission.
Recommended: GLB 336.

GLB 457 Strategic Issues in Global Business (4 Credits)

Selected current topics and their impact on business operations are explored in depth. This course emphasizes the need for businesses to closely monitor and develop both an understanding and sensitivity to major social, cultural, environmental, and political issues.
Prerequisites: senior standing, global business major or by permission.

GLB 459 Business Policy and Strategy for Bachelor of Science Majors (4 Credits)

Capstone course requiring students to integrate their knowledge of finance, law, accounting, and organizational and behavioral studies, and apply these topics to the development of business strategies in national and global contexts.
Prerequisites: GLB 240, GLB 350, ACCT 220, GLB 353 or ACCT 315 (which can be taken concurrently), GLB 336, or other approved course or by permission.