Environmental Studies

The Faculty 
Lamont Hempel
Hillary Jenkins
Daniel Klooster
Timothy Krantz
Blodwyn McIntyre
Valerie Roundtree

The Majors
The department provides students with the tools to analyze complex environmental problems and contribute to their solutions. Three majors are offered; a bachelor of arts in environmental studies, a bachelor of science in environmental science, and a bachelor of science in sustainable business. All three majors integrate social, ethical, and environmental science understandings of environmental issues. Environmental Studies majors examine the social, economic and political aspects of environmental issues, Environmental Science majors study the ecological, geological, chemical, and physical sciences to provide a quantitative understanding of environmental issues, and Sustainable Business majors integrate environmental challenges with successful business strategy and management practices. Capstone requirements and honors opportunities are the same for all three degrees and are found under the bachelor of science. A minor in a supporting field highly recommended, for example, spatial studies or environmental chemistry for the major in environmental science, or business administration for the major in environmental studies. The Sustainable Business degree contains the Business Administration minor embedded within it.

Students entering the major are expected to have a 2.3 cumulative GPA on a 4.0 scale. Transfer students are expected to have a 2.3 average from their previous school(s).

Learning outcomes for Environmental Studies may be found at www.redlands.edu/BA-EVST/learning-outcomes; learning outcomes for Environmental Science may be found at www.redlands.edu/BS-EVSS/learning-outcomes. Learning outcomes for Sustainable Business may be found at www.redlands.edu/BS-EVEM/learning-outcomes

Bachelor of Arts: Environmental Studies

Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of the major, an environmental studies major should be able to
1. Integrate social and environmental science to critically evaluate complex environmental problems or opportunities, emphasizing social sciences, ethical dimensions, and/or the humanities
2. Use appropriate tools to analyze and communicate environmental problems or opportunities
3. Apply interdisciplinary environmental learning to a specialization in Environmental Studies

Environmental Studies Categories and Courses (13 courses)

Foundation Course: 1 course at the 100 level.

Please note, students may take EVST 100 or equivalent. 

EVST 100 Introduction to Environmental Studies (4 Credits)

Overview of the major causes and consequences of pollution, natural resource depletion, and loss of biological diversity. The primary objective is to develop an interdisciplinary understanding of our natural environment, the human impacts that degrade it, and the measures we can take to protect and restore environmental quality.

Earth Science Core (1 course) at the 200-level

Please note, students choose one from the following: 

EVST 220 Physical Geography (4 Credits)

Exploration of the physical geography of Earth by examination of lithospheric, atmospheric, hydrological, and biological processes. Laboratory includes field methods, topographic map reading, and in-depth discussion of these principles. 
Prerequisite: EVST 100 or by permission.

EVST 290 Environmental Geology (4 Credits)

This course investigates how critical events in Earth history have shaped the landscape that we see today. Main topics include mountain building, volcanoes, faulting, glaciers, oceans and coastlines, energy resources, the geology of Southern California, and global climate change. Course includes a weekly lab/field component. 
Prerequisites: EVST 100 and MATH 101 or higher, or by permission.

Environmental Social Science Core (1 course) at the 200 level

EVST 240 Global Environment (4 Credits)

Analysis of selected problems of global environmental systems, including climate change, ozone depletion, oceanic pollution, and trans-boundary biodiversity issues. Emphasis on the conversion of environmental science into international law and policy. Examines the roles of international organizations, governments, industry, and trade in the effort to achieve sustainable development.
Prerequisite: EVST 100 or by permission.
Offered in alternate years.

Life Science Core (1 course) at the 200 level

Please note, students choose one from the following: 

EVST 305 Ecology for Environmental Scientists (4 Credits)

Exploration of environmental factors responsible for distributions of species, communities, and biomes with particular reference to human-induced changes in ecology. This is a writing-intensive course with emphasis on scientific writing and the use of the scientific method in ecological research. 
Prerequisites: EVST 100 and a WA course. 
Offered every year.

EVST 245 Marine Environmental Studies (4 Credits)

Overview of human environmental influence on the oceans. Combines the study of marine science, policy, and management in an effort to understand environmental protection issues arising from coastal development, overfishing, climate change, oil spills, and other threats to marine ecosystems. 
Prerequisite: EVST 100 or by permission. 
Offered as needed.

Tools, Applications, and Methods (2 courses)

The recommendation SPA 110 and one additional course. 

SPA 110 Introduction to Spatial Analysis and GIS (4 Credits)

Introduction to concepts of spatial analysis and geographic information systems (GIS). Emphasis on spatial reasoning and analysis. Topics include the spatial data models, data requirements and acquisition, spatial analysis using GIS, implementation within an organization, and especially the application of GIS to problem-solving in other disciplines. 

EVST 235 Environmental Impact Assessment (4 Credits)

Comprehensive overview of environmental impact assessment. Federal and State legislative foundations governing the content and process of environmental review are examined. Culminates in preparation of an environmental impact report analyzing the potential impacts and mitigations. 
Prerequisite: EVST 100 and completion of a WA course.

EVST 250 Environmental Design Studio I (3-4 Credits)

Students work collaboratively in teams on environmental problem-solving projects. Many studios make use of GIS and other spatial analysis tools. Research concepts and tools become more complex in advanced levels of this sequence. 
Prerequisites for EVST 250: EVST 100 and EVST 110 or by permission.

EVST 399 Research Methods & Design (4 Credits)

A survey course of qualitative and quantitative research methods used by environmental scientists. We will learn techniques from both social and natural sciences. A research proposal that can double as the EVST capstone proposal will be an end-goal of the course. Students from outside EVST can apply to join. Numeric grade only.
Prerequisite: EVST 250. 

POLI 202 Statistical Analysis and Mapping of Social Science Data (4 Credits)

Principles of hypothesis development and testing, strategies for making controlled comparisons, principles of statistical inference, and tests of statistical significance. Development and testing of important research questions using such prominent data sets as the General Social Survey and the National Election Series.

MATH 111 Elementary Statistics with Applications (4 Credits)

Descriptive and inferential statistics for students from diverse fields. Distribution, correlation, probability, hypothesis testing, use of tables, and examination of the misuse of statistics and relation of statistics to vital aspects of life. Computer packages used as tools throughout the course.

MATH 231 Introduction to Modeling (4 Credits)

Investigation of the process of modeling. Special emphasis placed on how to build, test, and refine models; how to analyze assumptions and results; and defining model limitations. Deterministic and stochastic models, rate equations and population dynamics, and statistical analysis. Final project tied to outside interests. 
Prerequisite: MATH 119 or MATH 121 or MATH 122 or MATH 221 or by permission.
Cross-listed with EVST.

Experiential Learning Practicum (0 credits)
Complete one of the following:
• Environmental Study Abroad
• Environmental Internship
• Environmental Travel Course
• Approved Environmental Community Service Activity

Environmental Studies Elective (1 course)
Choose any course in EVST numbered 200 and above. 

Advanced Environmental Studies Courses (4 courses)
Please note, at least 3 courses must be selected from the Social Science Electives List and at least 3 of the 4 must be taken within EVST. 

Social Science Electives (at least 3 courses)

EVST 210 Energy and the Environment (4 Credits)

Sources, production, distribution, and consumption of energy are considered with special attention to alternative energy systems—including wind, solar, and geothermal—and conservation. Environmental effects of air and water pollution also are considered. Experiments are conducted to aid in understanding the principles presented. Field trips to regional energy production facilities are included. 
Prerequisites: MATH 101 or high school algebra and EVST 100 or by permission. 

EVST 215 American Environmental Literature (4 Credits)

Investigation of the ways in which American experience with nature is both shaped by and reflected through literary fiction and non-fiction as well as poetry. 
Numeric grade only.

EVST 242 Food and Nature (4 Credits)

Examines the ways production, trade, and consumption of food affects workers, consumers, and ecosystems. Topics include the political economy of food systems, genetically modified food, biofuels, the carbon footprints, the modern meat system, and potential solutions such as fair trade, organic certification, the slow food movement, and local food. 
Prerequisite: EVST 100 recommended.

EVST 276 Market-based Conservation Policy (4 Credits)

Conservation policy increasingly relies on markets. Examples include non-governmental labels such as organic and fair trade as well as various payment for environmental services policies promoted by governments and international treaties. Concepts like equity, efficiency, the commodity chain, and the commodification of nature will be mobilized to analyze these policies. 
Recommended: EVST 100.

EVST 277 Environmental Justice (3-4 Credits)

This course will focus on issues of environmental justice with a particular emphasis on racism, classism, and sexism—both in the U.S. and globally—and how situations of environmental degradation impact some groups more significantly than others. Aspects of global capitalism will be examined as a contributing factor to environmental injustice.

EVST 300 Environmental World Views (4 Credits)

Interdisciplinary investigation of competing environmental perspectives and paradigms. Emphasis on implications for environmental science, policy, management, and ethics as influenced by worldviews. Students compare and contrast diverse environmental perspectives, strategic approaches, and decision-making processes with an eye to conflicting paradigms that underlie environmental controversies.

EVST 310 Environmental Law (4 Credits)

Exploration of the American legal system and the framework of creation, implementation, and interpretation of environmental laws. Study of the central role of regulatory agencies in developing and implementing environmental law and, of course, methods interpreting and shaping it. Includes analysis of major environmental laws and case studies. Emphasis on California and the West. 
Offered as needed.

EVST 311 Environmental Law in Action (3 Credits)

This course will introduce environmental law and policy, including the National Environmental Policy Act, the California Environmental Quality Act, the Endangered Species Act, the Clean Water Act, and the Clean Air Act. Through case study analysis, field excursions, and moot court exercises participants will model regulatory and non-regulatory decision-making processes. 
Prerequisites: EVST 100 or POLI 206 or POLI 207 and POLI 209. 
Course fee applies. 

EVST 315 Environmental Nonfiction (4 Credits)

This course prepares students to write nontechnical essays, reports, and articles on environmental topics and in various forms, including documentary, lyric, advocacy/public engagement, and experimental. Students read and discuss published nonfiction, write drafts and a final portfolio, and participate in group critiques.

EVST 325 Public Lands Policy (4 Credits)

Overview of the origins and history of public lands in the U.S. (National Parks, National Forests, Bureau of Land Management lands, and others). Exploration of policies governing public lands and historic and current management practices. Controversial issues on public lands will be examined and debated, as will compromises and solutions. 
Offered in alternate years.

EVST 335 Environment and Development (4 Credits)

Identifies threats to biodiversity and culture and relates them to poverty, inequality, and overexploitation. Traces roots of current problems to colonization, international exploitation, and national development models. Examines sustainable development debates and initiatives.

EVST 340 Green Business (4 Credits)

Examines various aspects of sustainability and options available to businesses to establish green practices. Explores opportunities that businesses create, the challenges encountered, and the contributions toward protecting the environment while simultaneously sustaining a profit. The role of environmental policy, leadership, technology, and public opinion is also investigated. 
Prerequisite: EVST 100 or ACCT 210. Not open to students who have received credit for BUS 308.

EVST 347 Innovation for Sustainability (4 Credits)

Participants join a team to develop sustainable products and services, conduct research with potential customers, build prototypes, and test them with target users. Each time the course is offered, students will be presented with a different design challenge, for example, a solar heated, solar powered, self-filtering shower using recycled water. 
Prerequisite: EVST 340.

EVST 350 Environmental Design Studio II (3-4 Credits)

Students work collaboratively in teams on environmental problem-solving projects. Many studios make use of GIS and other spatial analysis tools. Research concepts and tools become more complex in advanced levels of this sequence. 
Prerequisites for EVST 250: EVST 100 and EVST 110 or by permission.

EVST 351 PanaMapping: GIS in the Jungle (3 Credits)

Nicknamed 'GIS in the Jungle', students work in Panamanian rainforest preserve to gather original empirical evidence of forest growth, carbon content, watersheds, land cover, and land cover change. They produce maps and present their data and interpretations to conservation area stakeholders. Conservation challenges in indigenous areas are also addressed.

EVST 451 PanaMapping: GIS to Conserve the Rainforest (3 Credits)

Nicknamed 'GIS in the Jungle', students work in Panamanian rainforest preserve to gather original empirical evidence of forest growth, carbon
content, watersheds, land cover, and land cover change. They produce maps and present their data and interpretations to conservation area
stakeholders. Conservation challenges in indigenous areas are also addressed.

ACCT 210 Principles of Financial Accounting and Reporting (4 Credits)

Financial accounting and reporting concepts and procedures that provide a history of economic activity, resources, obligations. Emphasis is on preparing and using financial information at an enterprise level. 
Prerequisites: ECON 101.

BUS 136 Principles of Global Marketing (4 Credits)

Marketing concepts with emphasis on marketing management. Explores marketing strategies involving the variables of the marketing mix (product, pricing, promotion, and distribution), coordinated and integrated across multiple country markets. Examines the distinctive differences, influences, and issues faced by companies when conducting marketing activities in the domestic and global environment.

BUS 310 Principles of Management and Organization Behavior (4 Credits)

Dynamics of individual and group behavior are explored, in addition to selected topics of entrepreneurship, technology, and strategic planning. Students are asked to view the internal workings of organizations as well as to consider organizations in a larger, more global context. Classic and modern texts are used.
Prerequisites: BUS 136, ACCT 210, and junior standing or by permission.

ECON 205 Ecological Economics (4 Credits)

The course explores the relationship between the ecological system and economic sub-systems. Topics of the course include the economics of entropy, throughput, alternative notions of environmental sustainability, ecological impacts of technological change, limits to economic growth, and analysis of policies to promote sustainability. 
Prerequisite: ECON 100 or ECON 101 or by permission. 
Offered in alternate years.

PHIL 211 Environmental Ethics (4 Credits)

Examination of ethical issues about the environment: foundational questions about moral status, public policy issues, and questions of personal morality. Traditional perspectives such as anthropocentrism and individualism are contrasted with alternatives such as the Land Ethic and ecofeminism. 
Offered in alternate years.

PLCY 100 Introduction to Public Policy Analysis (4 Credits)

Introduction to both the theoretical foundations and processes of public policy-making. Case studies of educational policy, health care policy, economic policy, and/or tax policies.

POLI 207 Environmental Politics and Policy (4 Credits)

Explores local, national and international contexts within which key decisions about the environment are made, emphasizing the U.S. experience. Focuses on the tensions between science and politics, health/safety and national security, and action and values. Develops theoretical and analytical tools to evaluate policy responses to major environmental episodes and controversies.

REL 122 Religion and Ecology: Environmental Ethics (4 Credits)

Consideration of the environmental crisis from a religious perspective, and a search to understand why ecology is a problematic concern within religion. Evaluation of theological, philosophical, and sociological factors that shape the various religious responses to ecological concerns.

SPA 210 Advanced Spatial Analysis and GIS (4 Credits)

This course is directed at developing more advanced geospatial skills in students who have already been initiated in the basic concepts of geographical information systems. Students will use advanced GIS tools as well as be introduced to raster data processing in both ArcGIS Pro and ERDAS Imagine.
Prerequisite: SPA 110. 

SPA 230 GIS Field Methods (3 Credits)

This course focuses on developing the technical skills used for GIS data collection and analysis in the field. Each week we will go out into the field and learn field techniques, such as drones, ArcGIS apps, GPS units, etc. 
Prerequisite: SPA 110.
Offered as needed. 
Course fee applies.  

Natural Science Electives (choose no more than one from the following)

EVST 205 Great Environmental Disasters (4 Credits)

This course examines great environmental disasters that have occurred throughout geologic time. From the impact that resulted in the extinction of dinosaurs to the volcanic eruptions at Pompeii to the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, we develop an understanding of these events and their impacts from an earth science perspective.

EVST 225 California Plants: Taxonomy and Ecology (4 Credits)

Exploration of the biodiversity of California plant life. Lectures focus on the varied physical environments and ecology of California plant communities. Laboratories delve into the intimacies of plant taxonomy and identification. Field-trip laboratories will afford first-hand experience with coastal, interior valley, montane and desert plant communities and their environments.
Prerequisite: EVST 100 or by permission.
Offered in alternate years.

EVST 230 Biodiversity (4 Credits)

Examination of global and local biodiversity and the causes and implications of biodiversity decline. Emphasis on threatened and endangered species and human activities related to the decline of species. This course is field-trip and project intensive. 
Prerequisite: EVST 100 or by permission.

EVST 254 Climate Disruption: Science and Sustainability (4 Credits)

Examines dilemmas in climate science, politics, economics, and ethics—all with an eye to the implications for global and regional sustainability. Emphasis is placed on solutions and practices to minimize or adapt to climate impacts, ranging from green innovations in energy technology to climate-friendly changes in human values and behavior. 
Prerequisite: EVST 100 recommended. 
Numeric grade only.

EVST 255 Ornithology (4 Credits)

Provides a comprehensive overview of the science and field study of birds, ranging from their origin and evolution, physiology, anatomy, communication, behavior and environment, reproduction and development, population dynamics and conservation. Laboratories introduce students to auditory and field identification methods. 
Offered in alternate years.

EVST 281 The Palau Expedition: Explorations in Sustainable Development (3 Credits)

This course combines the study of Palau‘s marine ecology and natural history, its clan-based system of social organization, and its efforts to achieve sustainable forms of development. Students participate in a series of interviews with traditional chiefs, elder women, high-government officials, and Palauan conservation and natural resource experts. Extensive field study and immersion in the ocean and rainforests require strong swimming skills and excellent fitness.

EVST 355 The Ecology of Australia and New Zealand (3 Credits)

This course focuses on 1) evolution of present-day Australia and New Zealand through plate tectonics, geologic, and climatic history; 2) the diverse ecosystems that we will encounter; 3) how the two different cultures of native peoples (Aborigines and Maori) impacted their environments and how white Europeans impacted the native peoples and environments.

EVST 375 Tropical Rainforests: The Amazon, the Andes & the Inca (3 Credits)

In this course, we will travel to the tropical rainforests and the cloud forests of Peru to explore the climatology, ecology, and biodiversity of this region. We will explore the ancient culture of the Inca, their empire at Machu Picchu, and the modern Peruvian cultures that now thrive in this region. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

EVST 391 Environmental Hydrology (4 Credits)

This course examines the ways that water has shaped our planet by exploring the following topics: hydrologic cycling, spatiotemporal patterns of water distribution and scarcity, water quality and pollution, groundwater and stream flow, and the challenges surrounding water resource allocation. Course includes a weekly lab/field component with off-campus field trips. 
Prerequisite: EVST 100 and MATH 101 or higher, or by permission.

EVST 392 Oceanography (4 Credits)

In this course, we will examine the oceans from four different perspectives; the geological, chemical, physical, and biological. Select course topics include California beach erosion, coral reefs and atolls, black smokers, thermohaline circulation, the El Niño Southern Oscillation, wave formation, and red tides. 
Numeric grade only.
Prerequisite: EVST 100. 
Offered as needed.

EVST 430 Advanced Geology Seminar (4 Credits)

From the cliffs of Madagascar to the glacial crevasses of the Transantarctic Mountains to the selenite crystals of Mexico, the Earth is filled with formations that inspire wonder and awe. This course explores the geologic processes that create these amazing formations. 
Prerequisite: EVST 205 or EVST 220 or EVST 290 or by permission of instructor.

Capstone (1 course)

Please note, course is taken in the Spring of Senior Year. 

EVST 475 Capstone Senior Project in Environmental Studies (2-4 Credits)

Students complete a substantial project either as part of a group or individually. The work usually extends over two semesters. 
Numeric grade only.

See specific information for the capstone courses and honors policy following the Environmental Sciences major requirements.

Bachelor of Science Environmental Science

Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of the major, an environmental science major should be able to
1. Integrate social and environmental science to critically evaluate complex environmental problems or opportunities, with an emphasis in mathematics, ecology, biology, geology, chemistry, or physics.
2. Use appropriate tools to analyze and communicate environmental problems or opportunities
3. Apply interdisciplinary environmental learning to a specialization in Environmental Science

Environmental Science Categories and Courses (14 courses) 

Foundation Course: 1 course at the 100 level. 

EVST 100 Introduction to Environmental Studies (4 Credits)

Overview of the major causes and consequences of pollution, natural resource depletion, and loss of biological diversity. The primary objective is to develop an interdisciplinary understanding of our natural environment, the human impacts that degrade it, and the measures we can take to protect and restore environmental quality.

Earth Science Core (1 course) at the 200-level

Please note, students choose one from the following: 

EVST 220 Physical Geography (4 Credits)

Exploration of the physical geography of Earth by examination of lithospheric, atmospheric, hydrological, and biological processes. Laboratory includes field methods, topographic map reading, and in-depth discussion of these principles. 
Prerequisite: EVST 100 or by permission.

EVST 290 Environmental Geology (4 Credits)

This course investigates how critical events in Earth history have shaped the landscape that we see today. Main topics include mountain building, volcanoes, faulting, glaciers, oceans and coastlines, energy resources, the geology of Southern California, and global climate change. Course includes a weekly lab/field component. 
Prerequisites: EVST 100 and MATH 101 or higher, or by permission.

Environmental Social Science Core (1 course) at the 200 level

EVST 240 Global Environment (4 Credits)

Analysis of selected problems of global environmental systems, including climate change, ozone depletion, oceanic pollution, and trans-boundary biodiversity issues. Emphasis on the conversion of environmental science into international law and policy. Examines the roles of international organizations, governments, industry, and trade in the effort to achieve sustainable development.
Prerequisite: EVST 100 or by permission.
Offered in alternate years.

Life Science Core (1 course) at the 200 level

Please note, students choose one from the following: 

EVST 305 Ecology for Environmental Scientists (4 Credits)

Exploration of environmental factors responsible for distributions of species, communities, and biomes with particular reference to human-induced changes in ecology. This is a writing-intensive course with emphasis on scientific writing and the use of the scientific method in ecological research. 
Prerequisites: EVST 100 and a WA course. 
Offered every year.

EVST 245 Marine Environmental Studies (4 Credits)

Overview of human environmental influence on the oceans. Combines the study of marine science, policy, and management in an effort to understand environmental protection issues arising from coastal development, overfishing, climate change, oil spills, and other threats to marine ecosystems. 
Prerequisite: EVST 100 or by permission. 
Offered as needed.

Chemistry (1 course)

Please note, General Chemistry is recommended. Students choose from the following: 

CHEM 102 Introduction to Chemistry of the Environment (4 Credits)

Introductory course for students wishing to explore the sciences or needing preparation for General Chemistry. Topics in chemistry relevant to the environment such as energy needs, pollution, and pesticides will be discussed. Three hours lecture. No background in chemistry is required. Recommended for non-science majors. 
Numeric grade only.

CHEM 131 General Chemistry (4 Credits)

Introduction to chemistry, including properties, structure, and reactivity of atoms and molecules, with concurrent laboratory. First semester covers fundamental concepts of atomic structure, stoichiometry, aqueous reactions, states of matter, molecular structure and bonding, and thermochemistry. Second semester emphasizes group projects in equilibrium, electrochemistry, thermodynamics, kinetics, inorganic synthesis, and spectroscopy. Fall: four hours lecture and three hours laboratory. Spring: seven hours laboratory and group learning.
Prerequisite: Placement into MATH 118 or higher or prerequisite or corequisite of MATH 002L or MATH 111 higher math course or permission of chemistry department.
Corequisite: CHEM 131L.

EVST 290 Environmental Geology (4 Credits)

This course investigates how critical events in Earth history have shaped the landscape that we see today. Main topics include mountain building, volcanoes, faulting, glaciers, oceans and coastlines, energy resources, the geology of Southern California, and global climate change. Course includes a weekly lab/field component. 
Prerequisites: EVST 100 and MATH 101 or higher, or by permission.

Allied Science (1 course)
Take 1 course from Physics, Chemistry (132 and above), Biology (200 and above), or Spatial Studies (200 and above).

Math (1 course)

Either statistics or calculus fulfills this requirement. Both are recommended. Choose one from the following: 

EVST 399 Research Methods & Design (4 Credits)

A survey course of qualitative and quantitative research methods used by environmental scientists. We will learn techniques from both social and natural sciences. A research proposal that can double as the EVST capstone proposal will be an end-goal of the course. Students from outside EVST can apply to join. Numeric grade only.
Prerequisite: EVST 250. 

MATH 111 Elementary Statistics with Applications (4 Credits)

Descriptive and inferential statistics for students from diverse fields. Distribution, correlation, probability, hypothesis testing, use of tables, and examination of the misuse of statistics and relation of statistics to vital aspects of life. Computer packages used as tools throughout the course.

MATH 118 Integrated Calculus I (4 Credits)

For students whose programs require calculus but who, based on their background and placement examination scores, are not prepared for MATH 121. Topics from precalculus include properties of linear, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; and compositions, transformations, and inverses of these functions. Calculus topics include successive approximation and limits of functions; local linearity and differentiation; applications of differentiation to graphing and optimization; and the definite integral, antiderivatives, and differential equations.
Prerequisite: MATH 002L or Math Placement at MATH 118 level or by permission.

MATH 231 Introduction to Modeling (4 Credits)

Investigation of the process of modeling. Special emphasis placed on how to build, test, and refine models; how to analyze assumptions and results; and defining model limitations. Deterministic and stochastic models, rate equations and population dynamics, and statistical analysis. Final project tied to outside interests. 
Prerequisite: MATH 119 or MATH 121 or MATH 122 or MATH 221 or by permission.
Cross-listed with EVST.

POLI 202 Statistical Analysis and Mapping of Social Science Data (4 Credits)

Principles of hypothesis development and testing, strategies for making controlled comparisons, principles of statistical inference, and tests of statistical significance. Development and testing of important research questions using such prominent data sets as the General Social Survey and the National Election Series.

Environmental Studies Elective (1 course)
Choose any course in EVST numbered 200 and above. 

Advanced Environmental Science Courses (4 courses)

Please note, at least 3 courses must be selected from the Natural Sciences Electives List and at least 3 of the 4 must be taken within EVST.

Choose at least 3 from the following: 

Natural Science Electives

EVST 205 Great Environmental Disasters (4 Credits)

This course examines great environmental disasters that have occurred throughout geologic time. From the impact that resulted in the extinction of dinosaurs to the volcanic eruptions at Pompeii to the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, we develop an understanding of these events and their impacts from an earth science perspective.

EVST 225 California Plants: Taxonomy and Ecology (4 Credits)

Exploration of the biodiversity of California plant life. Lectures focus on the varied physical environments and ecology of California plant communities. Laboratories delve into the intimacies of plant taxonomy and identification. Field-trip laboratories will afford first-hand experience with coastal, interior valley, montane and desert plant communities and their environments.
Prerequisite: EVST 100 or by permission.
Offered in alternate years.

EVST 230 Biodiversity (4 Credits)

Examination of global and local biodiversity and the causes and implications of biodiversity decline. Emphasis on threatened and endangered species and human activities related to the decline of species. This course is field-trip and project intensive. 
Prerequisite: EVST 100 or by permission.

EVST 250 Environmental Design Studio I (3-4 Credits)

Students work collaboratively in teams on environmental problem-solving projects. Many studios make use of GIS and other spatial analysis tools. Research concepts and tools become more complex in advanced levels of this sequence. 
Prerequisites for EVST 250: EVST 100 and EVST 110 or by permission.

EVST 254 Climate Disruption: Science and Sustainability (4 Credits)

Examines dilemmas in climate science, politics, economics, and ethics—all with an eye to the implications for global and regional sustainability. Emphasis is placed on solutions and practices to minimize or adapt to climate impacts, ranging from green innovations in energy technology to climate-friendly changes in human values and behavior. 
Prerequisite: EVST 100 recommended. 
Numeric grade only.

EVST 255 Ornithology (4 Credits)

Provides a comprehensive overview of the science and field study of birds, ranging from their origin and evolution, physiology, anatomy, communication, behavior and environment, reproduction and development, population dynamics and conservation. Laboratories introduce students to auditory and field identification methods. 
Offered in alternate years.

EVST 281 The Palau Expedition: Explorations in Sustainable Development (3 Credits)

This course combines the study of Palau‘s marine ecology and natural history, its clan-based system of social organization, and its efforts to achieve sustainable forms of development. Students participate in a series of interviews with traditional chiefs, elder women, high-government officials, and Palauan conservation and natural resource experts. Extensive field study and immersion in the ocean and rainforests require strong swimming skills and excellent fitness.

EVST 350 Environmental Design Studio II (3-4 Credits)

Students work collaboratively in teams on environmental problem-solving projects. Many studios make use of GIS and other spatial analysis tools. Research concepts and tools become more complex in advanced levels of this sequence. 
Prerequisites for EVST 250: EVST 100 and EVST 110 or by permission.

EVST 355 The Ecology of Australia and New Zealand (3 Credits)

This course focuses on 1) evolution of present-day Australia and New Zealand through plate tectonics, geologic, and climatic history; 2) the diverse ecosystems that we will encounter; 3) how the two different cultures of native peoples (Aborigines and Maori) impacted their environments and how white Europeans impacted the native peoples and environments.

EVST 375 Tropical Rainforests: The Amazon, the Andes & the Inca (3 Credits)

In this course, we will travel to the tropical rainforests and the cloud forests of Peru to explore the climatology, ecology, and biodiversity of this region. We will explore the ancient culture of the Inca, their empire at Machu Picchu, and the modern Peruvian cultures that now thrive in this region. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

EVST 391 Environmental Hydrology (4 Credits)

This course examines the ways that water has shaped our planet by exploring the following topics: hydrologic cycling, spatiotemporal patterns of water distribution and scarcity, water quality and pollution, groundwater and stream flow, and the challenges surrounding water resource allocation. Course includes a weekly lab/field component with off-campus field trips. 
Prerequisite: EVST 100 and MATH 101 or higher, or by permission.

EVST 392 Oceanography (4 Credits)

In this course, we will examine the oceans from four different perspectives; the geological, chemical, physical, and biological. Select course topics include California beach erosion, coral reefs and atolls, black smokers, thermohaline circulation, the El Niño Southern Oscillation, wave formation, and red tides. 
Numeric grade only.
Prerequisite: EVST 100. 
Offered as needed.

EVST 430 Advanced Geology Seminar (4 Credits)

From the cliffs of Madagascar to the glacial crevasses of the Transantarctic Mountains to the selenite crystals of Mexico, the Earth is filled with formations that inspire wonder and awe. This course explores the geologic processes that create these amazing formations. 
Prerequisite: EVST 205 or EVST 220 or EVST 290 or by permission of instructor.

Choose no more than 1 from the following: 

Social Science Electives

EVST 210 Energy and the Environment (4 Credits)

Sources, production, distribution, and consumption of energy are considered with special attention to alternative energy systems—including wind, solar, and geothermal—and conservation. Environmental effects of air and water pollution also are considered. Experiments are conducted to aid in understanding the principles presented. Field trips to regional energy production facilities are included. 
Prerequisites: MATH 101 or high school algebra and EVST 100 or by permission. 

EVST 215 American Environmental Literature (4 Credits)

Investigation of the ways in which American experience with nature is both shaped by and reflected through literary fiction and non-fiction as well as poetry. 
Numeric grade only.

EVST 242 Food and Nature (4 Credits)

Examines the ways production, trade, and consumption of food affects workers, consumers, and ecosystems. Topics include the political economy of food systems, genetically modified food, biofuels, the carbon footprints, the modern meat system, and potential solutions such as fair trade, organic certification, the slow food movement, and local food. 
Prerequisite: EVST 100 recommended.

EVST 276 Market-based Conservation Policy (4 Credits)

Conservation policy increasingly relies on markets. Examples include non-governmental labels such as organic and fair trade as well as various payment for environmental services policies promoted by governments and international treaties. Concepts like equity, efficiency, the commodity chain, and the commodification of nature will be mobilized to analyze these policies. 
Recommended: EVST 100.

EVST 277 Environmental Justice (3-4 Credits)

This course will focus on issues of environmental justice with a particular emphasis on racism, classism, and sexism—both in the U.S. and globally—and how situations of environmental degradation impact some groups more significantly than others. Aspects of global capitalism will be examined as a contributing factor to environmental injustice.

EVST 300 Environmental World Views (4 Credits)

Interdisciplinary investigation of competing environmental perspectives and paradigms. Emphasis on implications for environmental science, policy, management, and ethics as influenced by worldviews. Students compare and contrast diverse environmental perspectives, strategic approaches, and decision-making processes with an eye to conflicting paradigms that underlie environmental controversies.

EVST 310 Environmental Law (4 Credits)

Exploration of the American legal system and the framework of creation, implementation, and interpretation of environmental laws. Study of the central role of regulatory agencies in developing and implementing environmental law and, of course, methods interpreting and shaping it. Includes analysis of major environmental laws and case studies. Emphasis on California and the West. 
Offered as needed.

EVST 311 Environmental Law in Action (3 Credits)

This course will introduce environmental law and policy, including the National Environmental Policy Act, the California Environmental Quality Act, the Endangered Species Act, the Clean Water Act, and the Clean Air Act. Through case study analysis, field excursions, and moot court exercises participants will model regulatory and non-regulatory decision-making processes. 
Prerequisites: EVST 100 or POLI 206 or POLI 207 and POLI 209. 
Course fee applies. 

EVST 315 Environmental Nonfiction (4 Credits)

This course prepares students to write nontechnical essays, reports, and articles on environmental topics and in various forms, including documentary, lyric, advocacy/public engagement, and experimental. Students read and discuss published nonfiction, write drafts and a final portfolio, and participate in group critiques.

EVST 325 Public Lands Policy (4 Credits)

Overview of the origins and history of public lands in the U.S. (National Parks, National Forests, Bureau of Land Management lands, and others). Exploration of policies governing public lands and historic and current management practices. Controversial issues on public lands will be examined and debated, as will compromises and solutions. 
Offered in alternate years.

EVST 335 Environment and Development (4 Credits)

Identifies threats to biodiversity and culture and relates them to poverty, inequality, and overexploitation. Traces roots of current problems to colonization, international exploitation, and national development models. Examines sustainable development debates and initiatives.

EVST 340 Green Business (4 Credits)

Examines various aspects of sustainability and options available to businesses to establish green practices. Explores opportunities that businesses create, the challenges encountered, and the contributions toward protecting the environment while simultaneously sustaining a profit. The role of environmental policy, leadership, technology, and public opinion is also investigated. 
Prerequisite: EVST 100 or ACCT 210. Not open to students who have received credit for BUS 308.

EVST 347 Innovation for Sustainability (4 Credits)

Participants join a team to develop sustainable products and services, conduct research with potential customers, build prototypes, and test them with target users. Each time the course is offered, students will be presented with a different design challenge, for example, a solar heated, solar powered, self-filtering shower using recycled water. 
Prerequisite: EVST 340.

EVST 351 PanaMapping: GIS in the Jungle (3 Credits)

Nicknamed 'GIS in the Jungle', students work in Panamanian rainforest preserve to gather original empirical evidence of forest growth, carbon content, watersheds, land cover, and land cover change. They produce maps and present their data and interpretations to conservation area stakeholders. Conservation challenges in indigenous areas are also addressed.

EVST 451 PanaMapping: GIS to Conserve the Rainforest (3 Credits)

Nicknamed 'GIS in the Jungle', students work in Panamanian rainforest preserve to gather original empirical evidence of forest growth, carbon
content, watersheds, land cover, and land cover change. They produce maps and present their data and interpretations to conservation area
stakeholders. Conservation challenges in indigenous areas are also addressed.

CHEM 312 Advanced Environmental Chemistry (4 Credits)

This course investigates environmental chemistry of local air, water, and soil systems, combined with mapping so that spatial trends can be observed. Global issues are also considered, allowing this knowledge base to be applied in multiple settings. Laboratory and fieldwork heavily based on EPA methods of sampling and chemical analysis. 
Prerequisite: CHEM 232, by permission only. 
Offered as needed.

CHEM 132 General Chemistry (4 Credits)

Introduction to chemistry, including properties, structure, and reactivity of atoms and molecules, with concurrent laboratory. First semester covers fundamental concepts of atomic structure, stoichiometry, aqueous reactions, states of matter, molecular structure and bonding, and thermochemistry. Second semester emphasizes group projects in equilibrium, electrochemistry, thermodynamics, kinetics, inorganic synthesis, and spectroscopy. Fall: four hours lecture and three hours laboratory. Spring: seven hours laboratory and group learning.
Prerequisite: CHEM 131 with a minimum grade of 2.0 or higher or by permission.

CHEM 231 Organic Chemistry (4 Credits)

Chemistry of carbon-containing compounds; their structure, nomenclature, physical properties, spectroscopy (IR, GC-MS, NMR), stereochemistry, chemical reactivities, mechanisms of reaction, and synthesis. Four hours lecture and three hours laboratory. 
Prerequisite for CHEM 231: Grade of 2.0 or higher in CHEM 132.

CHEM 232 Organic Chemistry (4 Credits)

Chemistry of carbon-containing compounds; their structure, nomenclature, physical properties, spectroscopy (IR, GC-MS, NMR), stereochemistry, chemical reactivities, mechanisms of reaction, and synthesis. Four hours lecture and three hours laboratory. 
Prerequisite for CHEM 232: CHEM 231.

CHEM 331 Physical Chemistry I (4 Credits)

Quantum chemistry, spectroscopy, and statistical thermodynamics applied to the study of the physical and chemical properties of matter. The laboratory involves the systematic study of the theory and practice of modern spectroscopic methods. Four hours lecture and three hours laboratory. 
Prerequisites: CHEM 132 and MATH 122 or higher math course and PHYS 220 or higher physics course or by permission. 

MATH 118 Integrated Calculus I (4 Credits)

For students whose programs require calculus but who, based on their background and placement examination scores, are not prepared for MATH 121. Topics from precalculus include properties of linear, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; and compositions, transformations, and inverses of these functions. Calculus topics include successive approximation and limits of functions; local linearity and differentiation; applications of differentiation to graphing and optimization; and the definite integral, antiderivatives, and differential equations.
Prerequisite: MATH 002L or Math Placement at MATH 118 level or by permission.

MATH 121 Calculus I (4 Credits)

Functions and their graphs; successive approximation and limits; local linearity and differentiation; applications of differentiation to graphing and optimization; and the definite integral, antiderivatives, and differential equations. 
Prerequisite: Permission based on Mathematics Placement Exam. 

MATH 150 Techniques in Problem Solving (1 Credits)

Practice in the mathematical area of problem-solving in preparation for the Putnam Examination. Material and problems are chosen from prior Putnam Exams, Mathematics Olympiads, and other sources; and from across mathematics, including basic strategies, combinatorics, geometry, induction, series, number theory, algebra, and calculus.
Credit/no credit grade option.
Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

MATH 231 Introduction to Modeling (4 Credits)

Investigation of the process of modeling. Special emphasis placed on how to build, test, and refine models; how to analyze assumptions and results; and defining model limitations. Deterministic and stochastic models, rate equations and population dynamics, and statistical analysis. Final project tied to outside interests. 
Prerequisite: MATH 119 or MATH 121 or MATH 122 or MATH 221 or by permission.
Cross-listed with EVST.

MATH 312 Mathematical Statistics (4 Credits)

Principles of statistical decision theory. Estimation and hypothesis testing, regression, and parametric and non-parametric tests. Mathematical theory and applications of above. 
Prerequisite: MATH 311 or by permission. 
Offered in alternate years.

MATH 335 Advanced Modeling Techniques (4 Credits)

Techniques for mathematical modeling of continuous, discrete, and stochastic systems are presented. Topics include purpose and validation, continuous systems, random numbers and variables, and discrete systems. 
Prerequisite: MATH 235.
Recommended: MATH 311.
Offered as needed.

PHYS 220 Fundamentals of Physics I (4 Credits)

Introduction to Newtonian mechanics, fluids, and thermodynamics. Includes lecture and laboratory components. Expects competency in high school algebra, geometry, and trigonometry.

PHYS 221 Fundamentals of Physics II (4 Credits)

Introduction to oscillations, waves, electricity, magnetism, optics, and modern physics. Includes lecture and laboratory components.
Prerequisite: PHYS 220.

PHYS 231 General Physics I (4 Credits)

Quantitative study of classical Newtonian mechanics. Includes lecture and laboratory components. 
Prerequisite: MATH 119, MATH 121, MATH 122 or MATH 221.

PHYS 232 General Physics II (4 Credits)

Introduction to classical electricity and magnetism. Includes lecture and laboratory components.
Prerequisite: PHYS 231; Pre- or corequisite: MATH 122 or MATH 221.

PHYS 233 General Physics III (4 Credits)

Introduction to geometric optics, wave optics, quantum mechanics, thermodynamics, and statistical mechanics. Includes lecture and laboratory components. 
Prerequisite: PHYS 231–232 or instructor’s permission. Pre- or corequisite: MATH 221.

SPA 210 Advanced Spatial Analysis and GIS (4 Credits)

This course is directed at developing more advanced geospatial skills in students who have already been initiated in the basic concepts of geographical information systems. Students will use advanced GIS tools as well as be introduced to raster data processing in both ArcGIS Pro and ERDAS Imagine.
Prerequisite: SPA 110. 

SPA 230 GIS Field Methods (3 Credits)

This course focuses on developing the technical skills used for GIS data collection and analysis in the field. Each week we will go out into the field and learn field techniques, such as drones, ArcGIS apps, GPS units, etc. 
Prerequisite: SPA 110.
Offered as needed. 
Course fee applies.  

SPA 425 Remote Sensing Image Analysis (4 Credits)

This course discusses the theoretical foundation of remote sensing and applied skills in image understanding and image interpretation that students can apply in their respective disciplines. Utilizing image analysis software, students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focusing on image data format, image display, image data collection, and image analysis and classification. 
Prerequisites: MATH 118 and 119 or higher or permission of instructor. 

Capstone (1 course)

Please note, course is taken in the Spring of Senior Year. 

EVST 475 Capstone Senior Project in Environmental Studies (2-4 Credits)

Students complete a substantial project either as part of a group or individually. The work usually extends over two semesters. 
Numeric grade only.

See specific information for the capstone courses and honors policy following the Environmental Sciences major requirements.

Capstone (4 credits)

The purpose of the senior capstone sequence is (1) to declare an area of specialization that caters to the student’s interest and abilities, (2) to prepare a literature review of key knowledge sources and use them to prepare a researchable question or theme about some aspect of the desired specialization, (3) to answer the question or explore a theme in ways that demonstrate high levels of relevant learning, analysis, and synthesis applied to the field of specialization, and (4) to integrate learning in the area of specialization and in previous coursework in ways that demonstrate the three EVST learning outcomes, along with practical knowledge of relevant career opportunities related to planning beyond college.

To that end, each student produces a senior portfolio that is evaluated by the student’s capstone advisor. The portfolio must include a research paper or essay focused on the student’s declared area of specialization, and/or selected work from previous classes that demonstrates student competence in Environmental Studies learning outcomes. These outcomes involve integrative thinking about the field, application of appropriate tools, and evidence of mastery of a well-defined area of specialization within the major or concentration. Students graduating in the Fall rather than the spring should consult their advisor to determine whether to take this course in the Junior spring or as an independent study in the fall of senior year.

Honors
Juniors hoping to graduate with an overall GPA or a GPA in the major of 3.7 or higher are eligible to apply for departmental honors during their junior year. Students must work with a faculty advisor to develop a detailed proposal, and then complete an individual honors project during their senior year. For information, speak to an EVST faculty member. Honors are conferred upon approval by a majority of the EVST faculty. Honors capstone projects will follow the normal sequence of steps, but will require high levels of independent and original research, culminating in more ambitious and extensive final products that will be evaluated by multiple members of the Environmental Studies faculty.

Bachelor of Science: Sustainable Business

Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of the major, a sustainable business major should be able to
1. Integrate social, economic, and environmental factors to critically evaluate problems and opportunities at the intersections of business and the environment
2. Use appropriate tools and methods of business analysis to analyze and communicate social, economic, and environmental factors of problems and opportunities at the intersections of business and the environment
3. Apply interdisciplinary learning to a specialization in Sustainable Business

Sustainable Business Categories and Courses (16 courses) 

Foundation Course (1course at the 100-level)

Please note, students may take EVST 100 or equivalent.

EVST 100 Introduction to Environmental Studies (4 Credits)

Overview of the major causes and consequences of pollution, natural resource depletion, and loss of biological diversity. The primary objective is to develop an interdisciplinary understanding of our natural environment, the human impacts that degrade it, and the measures we can take to protect and restore environmental quality.

Earth Science Core (1 course) at the 200-level

Please note, students choose one from the following: 

EVST 220 Physical Geography (4 Credits)

Exploration of the physical geography of Earth by examination of lithospheric, atmospheric, hydrological, and biological processes. Laboratory includes field methods, topographic map reading, and in-depth discussion of these principles. 
Prerequisite: EVST 100 or by permission.

EVST 290 Environmental Geology (4 Credits)

This course investigates how critical events in Earth history have shaped the landscape that we see today. Main topics include mountain building, volcanoes, faulting, glaciers, oceans and coastlines, energy resources, the geology of Southern California, and global climate change. Course includes a weekly lab/field component. 
Prerequisites: EVST 100 and MATH 101 or higher, or by permission.

Environmental Social Science Core (1 course) at the 200 level

EVST 240 Global Environment (4 Credits)

Analysis of selected problems of global environmental systems, including climate change, ozone depletion, oceanic pollution, and trans-boundary biodiversity issues. Emphasis on the conversion of environmental science into international law and policy. Examines the roles of international organizations, governments, industry, and trade in the effort to achieve sustainable development.
Prerequisite: EVST 100 or by permission.
Offered in alternate years.

Life Science Core (1 course) at the 200 level

Please note, students choose one from the following: 

EVST 305 Ecology for Environmental Scientists (4 Credits)

Exploration of environmental factors responsible for distributions of species, communities, and biomes with particular reference to human-induced changes in ecology. This is a writing-intensive course with emphasis on scientific writing and the use of the scientific method in ecological research. 
Prerequisites: EVST 100 and a WA course. 
Offered every year.

EVST 245 Marine Environmental Studies (4 Credits)

Overview of human environmental influence on the oceans. Combines the study of marine science, policy, and management in an effort to understand environmental protection issues arising from coastal development, overfishing, climate change, oil spills, and other threats to marine ecosystems. 
Prerequisite: EVST 100 or by permission. 
Offered as needed.

Tools, Applications, and Methods (2 courses)

The recommendation is SPA 110 and one additional course. Choose from the following:

SPA 110 Introduction to Spatial Analysis and GIS (4 Credits)

Introduction to concepts of spatial analysis and geographic information systems (GIS). Emphasis on spatial reasoning and analysis. Topics include the spatial data models, data requirements and acquisition, spatial analysis using GIS, implementation within an organization, and especially the application of GIS to problem-solving in other disciplines. 

EVST 235 Environmental Impact Assessment (4 Credits)

Comprehensive overview of environmental impact assessment. Federal and State legislative foundations governing the content and process of environmental review are examined. Culminates in preparation of an environmental impact report analyzing the potential impacts and mitigations. 
Prerequisite: EVST 100 and completion of a WA course.

EVST 250 Environmental Design Studio I (3-4 Credits)

Students work collaboratively in teams on environmental problem-solving projects. Many studios make use of GIS and other spatial analysis tools. Research concepts and tools become more complex in advanced levels of this sequence. 
Prerequisites for EVST 250: EVST 100 and EVST 110 or by permission.

EVST 399 Research Methods & Design (4 Credits)

A survey course of qualitative and quantitative research methods used by environmental scientists. We will learn techniques from both social and natural sciences. A research proposal that can double as the EVST capstone proposal will be an end-goal of the course. Students from outside EVST can apply to join. Numeric grade only.
Prerequisite: EVST 250. 

POLI 202 Statistical Analysis and Mapping of Social Science Data (4 Credits)

Principles of hypothesis development and testing, strategies for making controlled comparisons, principles of statistical inference, and tests of statistical significance. Development and testing of important research questions using such prominent data sets as the General Social Survey and the National Election Series.

MATH 111 Elementary Statistics with Applications (4 Credits)

Descriptive and inferential statistics for students from diverse fields. Distribution, correlation, probability, hypothesis testing, use of tables, and examination of the misuse of statistics and relation of statistics to vital aspects of life. Computer packages used as tools throughout the course.

MATH 231 Introduction to Modeling (4 Credits)

Investigation of the process of modeling. Special emphasis placed on how to build, test, and refine models; how to analyze assumptions and results; and defining model limitations. Deterministic and stochastic models, rate equations and population dynamics, and statistical analysis. Final project tied to outside interests. 
Prerequisite: MATH 119 or MATH 121 or MATH 122 or MATH 221 or by permission.
Cross-listed with EVST.

Sustainability Core (3 courses)

Choose from the following: 

EVST 248 Introduction to Sustainable Business (4 Credits)

Examines various aspects of sustainability and options available to businesses to establish sustainable practices. Explores opportunities that businesses create, the challenges encountered, and the contributions toward protecting the environment while simultaneously sustaining a profit. The role of environmental policy, leadership, technology, and public opinion is also investigated.
Prerequisites: EVST 100.
Numeric and Evaluation grade only.

EVST 340 Green Business (4 Credits)

Examines various aspects of sustainability and options available to businesses to establish green practices. Explores opportunities that businesses create, the challenges encountered, and the contributions toward protecting the environment while simultaneously sustaining a profit. The role of environmental policy, leadership, technology, and public opinion is also investigated. 
Prerequisite: EVST 100 or ACCT 210. Not open to students who have received credit for BUS 308.

ECON 205 Ecological Economics (4 Credits)

The course explores the relationship between the ecological system and economic sub-systems. Topics of the course include the economics of entropy, throughput, alternative notions of environmental sustainability, ecological impacts of technological change, limits to economic growth, and analysis of policies to promote sustainability. 
Prerequisite: ECON 100 or ECON 101 or by permission. 
Offered in alternate years.

ECON 455 Environmental and Resource Economics (4 Credits)

Overview of the theory and management of natural resource use and environmental policy. Topics include the control of air and water pollution, solid waste management, and recycling, forestry, curbing suburban sprawl, water management, and mitigation of climate change. Issues addressed from both theoretical and empirical perspectives. 
Prerequisite: ECON 350 or by permission. 
Recommended: ECON 351. 
Offered in alternate years.

Business Core (6 courses)

Choose from the following: 

ECON 101 Principles of Economics (4 Credits)

Introduction to the study of economic systems from a micro and macro perspective. The course includes economic principles underlying the process of consumption, production, and distribution in a market-oriented economy (microeconomics), and the structure, operation, measures, and major theoretical models of the whole economy (macroeconomics).

BUS 136 Principles of Global Marketing (4 Credits)

Marketing concepts with emphasis on marketing management. Explores marketing strategies involving the variables of the marketing mix (product, pricing, promotion, and distribution), coordinated and integrated across multiple country markets. Examines the distinctive differences, influences, and issues faced by companies when conducting marketing activities in the domestic and global environment.

BUS 226 Rise of Capitalism 1860–1941 (4 Credits)

Examines the evolution of capitalism in the United States within a global context. The growth of the firm, labor movements, technological innovation, development of the administrative state, financial and monetary reforms, and resistance to capitalism provide lenses to understand the period and parallels with contemporary issues in political economy.
Prerequisites: ECON 101 (or ECON 250 or ECON 251) with a minimum grade of 2.0 or higher; students must have a cumulative GPA of 2.7 to enroll, or by permission.
Additional course fees.

GLB 228 Globalization (4 Credits)

Traces the evolution of capitalism in the United States, China, Japan, and Europe, reviewing varying cultural and political approaches which create varied economic models. Students will explore the issues of doing business in each of the above-named nations or groups through analysis of an assigned company.

EVST 310 Environmental Law (4 Credits)

Exploration of the American legal system and the framework of creation, implementation, and interpretation of environmental laws. Study of the central role of regulatory agencies in developing and implementing environmental law and, of course, methods interpreting and shaping it. Includes analysis of major environmental laws and case studies. Emphasis on California and the West. 
Offered as needed.

BUS 240 Business Law (4 Credits)

An introduction to the American legal system, our constitutional framework, the role of judicial decisions, and statutory law. Special emphasis is placed on business torts and contract law, along with other concepts important in the business world.
Prerequisite: BUS 226, or BUS 228, or GLB 228, or ACCT 210, or by permission of the Chair.

ACCT 210 Principles of Financial Accounting and Reporting (4 Credits)

Financial accounting and reporting concepts and procedures that provide a history of economic activity, resources, obligations. Emphasis is on preparing and using financial information at an enterprise level. 
Prerequisites: ECON 101.

BUS 310 Principles of Management and Organization Behavior (4 Credits)

Dynamics of individual and group behavior are explored, in addition to selected topics of entrepreneurship, technology, and strategic planning. Students are asked to view the internal workings of organizations as well as to consider organizations in a larger, more global context. Classic and modern texts are used.
Prerequisites: BUS 136, ACCT 210, and junior standing or by permission.

BUS 410 Organizational Consulting (2-4 Credits)

An advanced management class that places student teams in organizational settings solving real client challenges. Students use conventional and design thinking processes to develop strategy for connecting with stakeholders, improve operations, and collect research key to decision making. Students are needed from across the college to make this class a success.
Prerequisite: BUS 310 recommended.

BUS 430 Human Resource Management (4 Credits)

Within the framework of U.S. legislative policy, this course covers issues in workforce management. These include staffing, employment quality, performance management, compensation and benefits, training and development, as well as labor relations and global influences.
Prerequisite: Senior standing, or by permission. 

Capstone (1 course)

Capstone is taken in the spring of senior year. See specific information for the capstone course and honors policy following the Environmental Sciences major requirements.

EVST 475 Capstone Senior Project in Environmental Studies (2-4 Credits)

Students complete a substantial project either as part of a group or individually. The work usually extends over two semesters. 
Numeric grade only.

The Minor (6 courses/ 24 credits)
Three courses must come from within the department. 

Foundation Course: 1 course at the 100 level.

Please note, students may take EVST 100 or equivalent. 

EVST 100 Introduction to Environmental Studies (4 Credits)

Overview of the major causes and consequences of pollution, natural resource depletion, and loss of biological diversity. The primary objective is to develop an interdisciplinary understanding of our natural environment, the human impacts that degrade it, and the measures we can take to protect and restore environmental quality.

Earth Science Core (1 course) at the 200-level

Please note, students choose one from the following: 

EVST 220 Physical Geography (4 Credits)

Exploration of the physical geography of Earth by examination of lithospheric, atmospheric, hydrological, and biological processes. Laboratory includes field methods, topographic map reading, and in-depth discussion of these principles. 
Prerequisite: EVST 100 or by permission.

EVST 290 Environmental Geology (4 Credits)

This course investigates how critical events in Earth history have shaped the landscape that we see today. Main topics include mountain building, volcanoes, faulting, glaciers, oceans and coastlines, energy resources, the geology of Southern California, and global climate change. Course includes a weekly lab/field component. 
Prerequisites: EVST 100 and MATH 101 or higher, or by permission.

Environmental Social Science Core (1 course) at the 200 level

EVST 240 Global Environment (4 Credits)

Analysis of selected problems of global environmental systems, including climate change, ozone depletion, oceanic pollution, and trans-boundary biodiversity issues. Emphasis on the conversion of environmental science into international law and policy. Examines the roles of international organizations, governments, industry, and trade in the effort to achieve sustainable development.
Prerequisite: EVST 100 or by permission.
Offered in alternate years.

Life Science Core (1 course) at the 200 level

Please note, students choose one from the following: 

EVST 305 Ecology for Environmental Scientists (4 Credits)

Exploration of environmental factors responsible for distributions of species, communities, and biomes with particular reference to human-induced changes in ecology. This is a writing-intensive course with emphasis on scientific writing and the use of the scientific method in ecological research. 
Prerequisites: EVST 100 and a WA course. 
Offered every year.

EVST 245 Marine Environmental Studies (4 Credits)

Overview of human environmental influence on the oceans. Combines the study of marine science, policy, and management in an effort to understand environmental protection issues arising from coastal development, overfishing, climate change, oil spills, and other threats to marine ecosystems. 
Prerequisite: EVST 100 or by permission. 
Offered as needed.

Tools, Applications, and Methods (2 courses)

The recommendation is SPA 110 and one additional course. Choose from the following:

SPA 110 Introduction to Spatial Analysis and GIS (4 Credits)

Introduction to concepts of spatial analysis and geographic information systems (GIS). Emphasis on spatial reasoning and analysis. Topics include the spatial data models, data requirements and acquisition, spatial analysis using GIS, implementation within an organization, and especially the application of GIS to problem-solving in other disciplines. 

EVST 235 Environmental Impact Assessment (4 Credits)

Comprehensive overview of environmental impact assessment. Federal and State legislative foundations governing the content and process of environmental review are examined. Culminates in preparation of an environmental impact report analyzing the potential impacts and mitigations. 
Prerequisite: EVST 100 and completion of a WA course.

EVST 250 Environmental Design Studio I (3-4 Credits)

Students work collaboratively in teams on environmental problem-solving projects. Many studios make use of GIS and other spatial analysis tools. Research concepts and tools become more complex in advanced levels of this sequence. 
Prerequisites for EVST 250: EVST 100 and EVST 110 or by permission.

EVST 399 Research Methods & Design (4 Credits)

A survey course of qualitative and quantitative research methods used by environmental scientists. We will learn techniques from both social and natural sciences. A research proposal that can double as the EVST capstone proposal will be an end-goal of the course. Students from outside EVST can apply to join. Numeric grade only.
Prerequisite: EVST 250. 

POLI 202 Statistical Analysis and Mapping of Social Science Data (4 Credits)

Principles of hypothesis development and testing, strategies for making controlled comparisons, principles of statistical inference, and tests of statistical significance. Development and testing of important research questions using such prominent data sets as the General Social Survey and the National Election Series.

MATH 111 Elementary Statistics with Applications (4 Credits)

Descriptive and inferential statistics for students from diverse fields. Distribution, correlation, probability, hypothesis testing, use of tables, and examination of the misuse of statistics and relation of statistics to vital aspects of life. Computer packages used as tools throughout the course.

MATH 231 Introduction to Modeling (4 Credits)

Investigation of the process of modeling. Special emphasis placed on how to build, test, and refine models; how to analyze assumptions and results; and defining model limitations. Deterministic and stochastic models, rate equations and population dynamics, and statistical analysis. Final project tied to outside interests. 
Prerequisite: MATH 119 or MATH 121 or MATH 122 or MATH 221 or by permission.
Cross-listed with EVST.

Environmental Studies Elective (1 course)

Choose any course in EVST numbered 200 and above. 

Teaching Credential Subject Matter Program in Environmental Studies 
Students who wish to be certified to teach science must pass the CSET and CBEST examinations. The best preparation for these examinations is a B.S. in Environmental Science or B.A. in Environmental Studies. Students must meet with the director of the Center for Science and Mathematics and with an advisor in the School of Education for information concerning certification and the teacher education preparation program process. Most students complete the teacher preparation program, including student teaching, during a fifth year after graduation. Please refer to the Education section under the College of Arts and Sciences of this Catalog “Preliminary Teacher Credential Program” for a more detailed list of requirements.

Advanced Placement in Environmental Studies
Students who receive a score of four or higher on the Advanced Placement Test will receive credit for EVST 100.

Program Honors
Students with outstanding records of academic achievement (GPA of 3.7 or higher in the major) may apply for departmental honors during the second semester of their junior year, but no later than the end of the fourth full week of their first semester as a senior. Candidates must complete an honors capstone project on a challenging topic approved by a faculty committee. The project must demonstrate both analysis and synthesis of environmental issues, along with constructive critical thought. Candidates who successfully complete and defend their final projects before a faculty committee will graduate with honors in Environmental Studies.

Course Descriptions (EVST)

EVST 100 Introduction to Environmental Studies (4 Credits)

Overview of the major causes and consequences of pollution, natural resource depletion, and loss of biological diversity. The primary objective is to develop an interdisciplinary understanding of our natural environment, the human impacts that degrade it, and the measures we can take to protect and restore environmental quality.

EVST 102 Environmental Geography of Southern California (3-4 Credits)

A local geographic “laboratory” for applying environmental concepts and studying the physical and cultural geography of Southern California. Using historical and scientific field surveys, students trace the roots of regional environmental problems. 

EVST 110 Introduction to Spatial Analysis and GI (4 Credits)

Introduction to concepts of spatial analysis and to geographic information systems (GIS). Emphasis on spatial reasoning and analysis. Topics include spatial data models; data requirements and acquisition; spatial analysis using GIS; implementation within an organization; and especially, the application of GIS to problem-solving in other disciplines. Two lectures and two laboratories. Not open to students who have received credit for SPA 110.
Prerequisite: EVST 100 or by permission.

EVST 205 Great Environmental Disasters (4 Credits)

This course examines great environmental disasters that have occurred throughout geologic time. From the impact that resulted in the extinction of dinosaurs to the volcanic eruptions at Pompeii to the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, we develop an understanding of these events and their impacts from an earth science perspective.

EVST 210 Energy and the Environment (4 Credits)

Sources, production, distribution, and consumption of energy are considered with special attention to alternative energy systems—including wind, solar, and geothermal—and conservation. Environmental effects of air and water pollution also are considered. Experiments are conducted to aid in understanding the principles presented. Field trips to regional energy production facilities are included. 
Prerequisites: MATH 101 or high school algebra and EVST 100 or by permission. 

EVST 215 American Environmental Literature (4 Credits)

Investigation of the ways in which American experience with nature is both shaped by and reflected through literary fiction and non-fiction as well as poetry. 
Numeric grade only.

EVST 220 Physical Geography (4 Credits)

Exploration of the physical geography of Earth by examination of lithospheric, atmospheric, hydrological, and biological processes. Laboratory includes field methods, topographic map reading, and in-depth discussion of these principles. 
Prerequisite: EVST 100 or by permission.

EVST 225 California Plants: Taxonomy and Ecology (4 Credits)

Exploration of the biodiversity of California plant life. Lectures focus on the varied physical environments and ecology of California plant communities. Laboratories delve into the intimacies of plant taxonomy and identification. Field-trip laboratories will afford first-hand experience with coastal, interior valley, montane and desert plant communities and their environments.
Prerequisite: EVST 100 or by permission.
Offered in alternate years.

EVST 230 Biodiversity (4 Credits)

Examination of global and local biodiversity and the causes and implications of biodiversity decline. Emphasis on threatened and endangered species and human activities related to the decline of species. This course is field-trip and project intensive. 
Prerequisite: EVST 100 or by permission.

EVST 235 Environmental Impact Assessment (4 Credits)

Comprehensive overview of environmental impact assessment. Federal and State legislative foundations governing the content and process of environmental review are examined. Culminates in preparation of an environmental impact report analyzing the potential impacts and mitigations. 
Prerequisite: EVST 100 and completion of a WA course.

EVST 240 Global Environment (4 Credits)

Analysis of selected problems of global environmental systems, including climate change, ozone depletion, oceanic pollution, and trans-boundary biodiversity issues. Emphasis on the conversion of environmental science into international law and policy. Examines the roles of international organizations, governments, industry, and trade in the effort to achieve sustainable development.
Prerequisite: EVST 100 or by permission.
Offered in alternate years.

EVST 242 Food and Nature (4 Credits)

Examines the ways production, trade, and consumption of food affects workers, consumers, and ecosystems. Topics include the political economy of food systems, genetically modified food, biofuels, the carbon footprints, the modern meat system, and potential solutions such as fair trade, organic certification, the slow food movement, and local food. 
Prerequisite: EVST 100 recommended.

EVST 245 Marine Environmental Studies (4 Credits)

Overview of human environmental influence on the oceans. Combines the study of marine science, policy, and management in an effort to understand environmental protection issues arising from coastal development, overfishing, climate change, oil spills, and other threats to marine ecosystems. 
Prerequisite: EVST 100 or by permission. 
Offered as needed.

EVST 248 Introduction to Sustainable Business (4 Credits)

Examines various aspects of sustainability and options available to businesses to establish sustainable practices. Explores opportunities that businesses create, the challenges encountered, and the contributions toward protecting the environment while simultaneously sustaining a profit. The role of environmental policy, leadership, technology, and public opinion is also investigated.
Prerequisites: EVST 100.
Numeric and Evaluation grade only.

EVST 250 Environmental Design Studio I (3-4 Credits)

Students work collaboratively in teams on environmental problem-solving projects. Many studios make use of GIS and other spatial analysis tools. Research concepts and tools become more complex in advanced levels of this sequence. 
Prerequisites for EVST 250: EVST 100 and EVST 110 or by permission.

EVST 350 Environmental Design Studio II (3-4 Credits)

Students work collaboratively in teams on environmental problem-solving projects. Many studios make use of GIS and other spatial analysis tools. Research concepts and tools become more complex in advanced levels of this sequence. 
Prerequisites for EVST 250: EVST 100 and EVST 110 or by permission.

EVST 450 Environmental Design Studio III (3-4 Credits)

Students work collaboratively in teams on environmental problem-solving projects. Many studios make use of GIS and other spatial analysis tools. Research concepts and tools become more complex in advanced levels of this sequence. 
Prerequisites for EVST 250: EVST 100 and EVST 110 or by permission.

EVST 254 Climate Disruption: Science and Sustainability (4 Credits)

Examines dilemmas in climate science, politics, economics, and ethics—all with an eye to the implications for global and regional sustainability. Emphasis is placed on solutions and practices to minimize or adapt to climate impacts, ranging from green innovations in energy technology to climate-friendly changes in human values and behavior. 
Prerequisite: EVST 100 recommended. 
Numeric grade only.

EVST 255 Ornithology (4 Credits)

Provides a comprehensive overview of the science and field study of birds, ranging from their origin and evolution, physiology, anatomy, communication, behavior and environment, reproduction and development, population dynamics and conservation. Laboratories introduce students to auditory and field identification methods. 
Offered in alternate years.

EVST 260 Topics in Environmental Studies (1-4 Credits)

Topics of current interest in environmental studies such as energy, air quality, water, and environmental justice. May be repeated for degree credit up to a maximum of 8 credits.

EVST 270 Directed Study (2-4 Credits)

See in instructor for specific course description. 

EVST 275 Conservation in Practice (4 Credits)

Analyzes the different factors–cultural, socioeconomic, political, and biological–that underlie environmental problems. It reviews some of the most important conservation tools developed and applied by various disciplines in an attempt to integrate them as a trans-disciplinary approach.
Prerequisite: EVST 100 or by permission.
Offered as needed.

EVST 276 Market-based Conservation Policy (4 Credits)

Conservation policy increasingly relies on markets. Examples include non-governmental labels such as organic and fair trade as well as various payment for environmental services policies promoted by governments and international treaties. Concepts like equity, efficiency, the commodity chain, and the commodification of nature will be mobilized to analyze these policies. 
Recommended: EVST 100.

EVST 277 Environmental Justice (3-4 Credits)

This course will focus on issues of environmental justice with a particular emphasis on racism, classism, and sexism—both in the U.S. and globally—and how situations of environmental degradation impact some groups more significantly than others. Aspects of global capitalism will be examined as a contributing factor to environmental injustice.

EVST 281 The Palau Expedition: Explorations in Sustainable Development (3 Credits)

This course combines the study of Palau‘s marine ecology and natural history, its clan-based system of social organization, and its efforts to achieve sustainable forms of development. Students participate in a series of interviews with traditional chiefs, elder women, high-government officials, and Palauan conservation and natural resource experts. Extensive field study and immersion in the ocean and rainforests require strong swimming skills and excellent fitness.

EVST 283 Mapping Animals (3 Credits)

Investigation of animal movements and behavior from a spatial perspective. Emphasis on using mapping tools to design conservation strategies with an understanding of species’ behavioral ecology. Course includes weekly field trips to study local species within their natural environment. 
Prerequisite: BIOL 133 or EVST 100 or permission of instructor.

EVST 285 Tetiaroa Geodatabase Project (3 Credits)

Students will complete surveys of the flora and fauna of the Tetiaroa atoll, including establishing monitoring programs for terrestrial and marine ecosystems. Data collection using GPS will be entered into a GIS for the project, to be maintained at the U.C. South Pacific Research Station on Moorea, French Polynesia. 
Prerequisite: EVST 110 or SPA 100 or SPA 110 or by permission.

EVST 287 Beaches, Environment, and Society (3 Credits)

This course represents an interdisciplinary environmental studies exploration of beaches connecting the geology and the ecology of a dynamic environment to the history, economics, and politics of human uses of beaches. Topics include tourism, recreational uses, contests over access, oil extraction, beach replenishment, and sea level rise. 

EVST 290 Environmental Geology (4 Credits)

This course investigates how critical events in Earth history have shaped the landscape that we see today. Main topics include mountain building, volcanoes, faulting, glaciers, oceans and coastlines, energy resources, the geology of Southern California, and global climate change. Course includes a weekly lab/field component. 
Prerequisites: EVST 100 and MATH 101 or higher, or by permission.

EVST 300 Environmental World Views (4 Credits)

Interdisciplinary investigation of competing environmental perspectives and paradigms. Emphasis on implications for environmental science, policy, management, and ethics as influenced by worldviews. Students compare and contrast diverse environmental perspectives, strategic approaches, and decision-making processes with an eye to conflicting paradigms that underlie environmental controversies.

EVST 305 Ecology for Environmental Scientists (4 Credits)

Exploration of environmental factors responsible for distributions of species, communities, and biomes with particular reference to human-induced changes in ecology. This is a writing-intensive course with emphasis on scientific writing and the use of the scientific method in ecological research. 
Prerequisites: EVST 100 and a WA course. 
Offered every year.

EVST 310 Environmental Law (4 Credits)

Exploration of the American legal system and the framework of creation, implementation, and interpretation of environmental laws. Study of the central role of regulatory agencies in developing and implementing environmental law and, of course, methods interpreting and shaping it. Includes analysis of major environmental laws and case studies. Emphasis on California and the West. 
Offered as needed.

EVST 311 Environmental Law in Action (3 Credits)

This course will introduce environmental law and policy, including the National Environmental Policy Act, the California Environmental Quality Act, the Endangered Species Act, the Clean Water Act, and the Clean Air Act. Through case study analysis, field excursions, and moot court exercises participants will model regulatory and non-regulatory decision-making processes. 
Prerequisites: EVST 100 or POLI 206 or POLI 207 and POLI 209. 
Course fee applies. 

EVST 315 Environmental Nonfiction (4 Credits)

This course prepares students to write nontechnical essays, reports, and articles on environmental topics and in various forms, including documentary, lyric, advocacy/public engagement, and experimental. Students read and discuss published nonfiction, write drafts and a final portfolio, and participate in group critiques.

EVST 320 Environmental Policy and Management (4 Credits)

Examination of policy actors and institutions shaping environmental management and worldviews from which they are derived. Study of competing discourses, influence of public and private actors and institutions, and interplay between parties. Examination of policy and management implications from standpoints of decision making content and process.
Offered in alternate years.

EVST 325 Public Lands Policy (4 Credits)

Overview of the origins and history of public lands in the U.S. (National Parks, National Forests, Bureau of Land Management lands, and others). Exploration of policies governing public lands and historic and current management practices. Controversial issues on public lands will be examined and debated, as will compromises and solutions. 
Offered in alternate years.

EVST 330 Environmental Policy Clinic (4 Credits)

Students and faculty create innovative policy responses to concrete environmental problems, typically resulting in a report or major presentation about a specific environmental improvement strategy to a government client or a group of stakeholders. Emphasis on policy and management strategy design; focus on political, economic, and managerial feasibility of environmental controversy resolution. May be repeated for degree credit, for a maximum of 8 credits, given a different topic. 
Prerequisite: EVST 300 or EVST 320. 
Offered in alternate years.

EVST 335 Environment and Development (4 Credits)

Identifies threats to biodiversity and culture and relates them to poverty, inequality, and overexploitation. Traces roots of current problems to colonization, international exploitation, and national development models. Examines sustainable development debates and initiatives.

EVST 340 Green Business (4 Credits)

Examines various aspects of sustainability and options available to businesses to establish green practices. Explores opportunities that businesses create, the challenges encountered, and the contributions toward protecting the environment while simultaneously sustaining a profit. The role of environmental policy, leadership, technology, and public opinion is also investigated. 
Prerequisite: EVST 100 or ACCT 210. Not open to students who have received credit for BUS 308.

EVST 345 Sustainable Development and Migration in Mexico (3 Credits)

Through visits, this class examines the role of indigenous communities in conservation and development projects, such as ecotourism, forestry, and environmental service provision. It analyzes the role of local social institutions of self-governance in these projects, and the impacts of migration to the U.S. on institutions, conservation, and development possibilities.
Prerequisite: by permission.

EVST 347 Innovation for Sustainability (4 Credits)

Participants join a team to develop sustainable products and services, conduct research with potential customers, build prototypes, and test them with target users. Each time the course is offered, students will be presented with a different design challenge, for example, a solar heated, solar powered, self-filtering shower using recycled water. 
Prerequisite: EVST 340.

EVST 350 Environmental Design Studio II (3-4 Credits)

Students work collaboratively in teams on environmental problem-solving projects. Many studios make use of GIS and other spatial analysis tools. Research concepts and tools become more complex in advanced levels of this sequence. 
Prerequisites for EVST 250: EVST 100 and EVST 110 or by permission.

EVST 351 PanaMapping: GIS in the Jungle (3 Credits)

Nicknamed 'GIS in the Jungle', students work in Panamanian rainforest preserve to gather original empirical evidence of forest growth, carbon content, watersheds, land cover, and land cover change. They produce maps and present their data and interpretations to conservation area stakeholders. Conservation challenges in indigenous areas are also addressed.

EVST 355 The Ecology of Australia and New Zealand (3 Credits)

This course focuses on 1) evolution of present-day Australia and New Zealand through plate tectonics, geologic, and climatic history; 2) the diverse ecosystems that we will encounter; 3) how the two different cultures of native peoples (Aborigines and Maori) impacted their environments and how white Europeans impacted the native peoples and environments.

EVST 360 Advanced Topics in Environmental Studies (1-4 Credits)

Consideration of recent research developments in environmental science with varying topics each semester. Examples include tropical island biogeography, physical biogeography, and California plants’ taxonomy and ecology. May be repeated for degree credit up to a maximum of 8 credits.

EVST 371 Conservation Communication (3 Credits)

A project-based course that develops skills in communicating conservation opportunities. Activities include: writing about science in creative ways, designing engaging materials for museums, science centers, and parks, learning several media tools, and examining evolutionary, cognitive, and neurobiological approaches to the study of narrative. 
Prerequisites: BIOL 107, or BIOL 108, or BIOL 109, or BIOL 200, or EVST 100.
Course fee applies. 

EVST 375 Tropical Rainforests: The Amazon, the Andes & the Inca (3 Credits)

In this course, we will travel to the tropical rainforests and the cloud forests of Peru to explore the climatology, ecology, and biodiversity of this region. We will explore the ancient culture of the Inca, their empire at Machu Picchu, and the modern Peruvian cultures that now thrive in this region. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

EVST 385 Advanced Program Internship (2-4 Credits)

May be repeated for degree credit for a maximum of 8 credits with permission of the Chair. 
Credit/no credit only.

EVST 391 Environmental Hydrology (4 Credits)

This course examines the ways that water has shaped our planet by exploring the following topics: hydrologic cycling, spatiotemporal patterns of water distribution and scarcity, water quality and pollution, groundwater and stream flow, and the challenges surrounding water resource allocation. Course includes a weekly lab/field component with off-campus field trips. 
Prerequisite: EVST 100 and MATH 101 or higher, or by permission.

EVST 392 Oceanography (4 Credits)

In this course, we will examine the oceans from four different perspectives; the geological, chemical, physical, and biological. Select course topics include California beach erosion, coral reefs and atolls, black smokers, thermohaline circulation, the El Niño Southern Oscillation, wave formation, and red tides. 
Numeric grade only.
Prerequisite: EVST 100. 
Offered as needed.

EVST 399 Research Methods & Design (4 Credits)

A survey course of qualitative and quantitative research methods used by environmental scientists. We will learn techniques from both social and natural sciences. A research proposal that can double as the EVST capstone proposal will be an end-goal of the course. Students from outside EVST can apply to join. Numeric grade only.
Prerequisite: EVST 250. 

EVST 430 Advanced Geology Seminar (4 Credits)

From the cliffs of Madagascar to the glacial crevasses of the Transantarctic Mountains to the selenite crystals of Mexico, the Earth is filled with formations that inspire wonder and awe. This course explores the geologic processes that create these amazing formations. 
Prerequisite: EVST 205 or EVST 220 or EVST 290 or by permission of instructor.

EVST 448 Sustainable Business Capstone (4 Credits)

Students complete a substantial sustainable business project either as part of a group or individually.
Prerequisites: EVST 340 OR EVST 248.
May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.
Offered as needed.

EVST 450 Environmental Design Studio III (3-4 Credits)

Students work collaboratively in teams on environmental problem-solving projects. Many studios make use of GIS and other spatial analysis tools. Research concepts and tools become more complex in advanced levels of this sequence. 
Prerequisites for EVST 250: EVST 100 and EVST 110 or by permission.

EVST 451 PanaMapping: GIS to Conserve the Rainforest (3 Credits)

Nicknamed 'GIS in the Jungle', students work in Panamanian rainforest preserve to gather original empirical evidence of forest growth, carbon
content, watersheds, land cover, and land cover change. They produce maps and present their data and interpretations to conservation area
stakeholders. Conservation challenges in indigenous areas are also addressed.

EVST 475 Capstone Senior Project in Environmental Studies (2-4 Credits)

Students complete a substantial project either as part of a group or individually. The work usually extends over two semesters. 
Numeric grade only.

EVST 485 Advanced Program Internship (2-4 Credits)

May be repeated for degree credit for a maximum of 8 credits with permission of the Chair. 
Credit/no credit only.