English 

The Faculty 
Nancy Carrick
Anne Cavender
Claudia Ingram
Priya Jha
Daniel Kiefer
Heather King
Sharon Oster
Judith Tschann

The English program offers a major and minor, with courses that engage students’ critical and interpretive thinking refine their abilities in prose argument, in writing, and oral communication. Diverse course offerings include topics in American, British, ethnic, global, and postcolonial literatures; cultural studies; Holocaust studies; digital literacies; on genres such as graphic narrative; drama; theory; poetry; film; literary adaptations; and, children’s and YA fiction, spanning classical antiquity to the twenty-first century. Our classes emphasize the practices of close and engaged literary reading alongside critical writing, using a variety of disciplinary and methodological perspectives. The program offers the opportunity to pursue departmental honors, curricular flexibility for those pursuing double majors, as well as a pathway to various teaching credential programs. 

The English program also offers opportunities to enrich the student experience of the discipline of English, including membership in the English honor society Sigma Tau Delta, completion of coursework toward the major through study abroad, and work experience in the Writing Center.

Alumni from the University of Redlands English program have pursued careers in education, law, GIS technology, publishing, medicine, non-profit administration, and professional writing, as well as advanced degrees in literature, higher education, law, creative writing, and business, among others.

Learning outcomes for this program may be found at www.redlands.edu/BA-EGLT/learning-outcomes.

The Major
The required courses are designed to help students acquire a sensitivity to linguistic nuance and power and an ability to communicate persuasively.

Bachelor of Arts
Requirements: Minimum of 11 courses
There are four core courses required for the English Literature major; two taken at the sophomore level and two at the senior level:

Core Requirements (4 courses/ 16 credits)

Please note: students may choose between ENGL 402 or ENGL 403.

ENGL 201 Critical Reading (4 Credits)

An introduction to close critical reading of texts in several genres and to argument about literary texts. Students will attend to the characteristics and effects of literary language and will explore varieties of form, structure, style, and genre. They will also be introduced to a basic vocabulary of literary critical terms. 
Prerequisite: one 100-level literature course or comparable first-year seminar or by permission.

ENGL 202 Texts and Contexts (4 Credits)

This course builds on the interpretive strategies acquired in English 201. Students will develop the ability to place their own interpretations in conversation with those of other critics. They will be introduced to literary theory and its application to texts, as well as disciplinary research methods.  
Recommended: ENGL 201.

ENGL 402 History of Literary Criticism and Theory (4 Credits)

Survey of literary criticism from ancient times to the middle of the 20th century. Combines representative readings of influential critics with imaginative writing. 
Prerequisite: junior standing or by permission.

ENGL 403 Contemporary Literary Criticism and Theory (4 Credits)

Exploration of representative schools of current literary theory. Topics may vary, but the course is a combination of theory with readings in fiction and poetry. 
Prerequisite: junior standing or by permission.

ENGL 420 Senior Seminar in Literature (4 Credits)

Capstone course designed to allow students to reflect upon and synthesize their work in the major. Requirements include a portfolio of representative work, with a reflective narrative; a teaching component; and a research supported essay demonstrating substantial new work, whether a revision of a previous essay or a new undertaking. 
Prerequisite: senior standing recommended.

Electives (7 courses/ 28 credits)
In addition to these four courses, majors will choose (in consultation with their advisors) seven courses from department offerings that will broaden and deepen their literary studies. At least one course from these seven should be devoted to literature prior to 1800, and at least four of them must be at the 300 level or above.

Recommendations
• Students should think carefully about breadth in choosing their classes, taking a thoughtful combination of historical time periods, critical methodologies, and national traditions.
• Subject to departmental approval, upper-division literature classes in a foreign language may fulfill a student’s advanced major requirements.
• Subject to departmental approval, Johnston seminars may fulfill a student’s major requirements.
• Students are encouraged to study abroad during their junior year in order to immerse themselves in another culture and to expand their breadth of knowledge of other literary and interpretive practices.

Departmental Honors
Exceptionally able and motivated students with a GPA of 3.5 or higher in the major are eligible to apply for consideration to pursue an honors project. Interested students should consult their advisors for information about application procedures and requirements no later than the second semester of their junior year.

Subject Matter Teaching Credential
Students who want to be certified to teach English need to pass the PRAXIS, SSAT, and CBEST examinations. The best preparation for these examinations is a B.A. in English. Consult with the department chair and meet with an advisor in the School of Education for information concerning certification and the Basic Teaching Credential Program (including student teaching). Also, see the School of Education section of this Catalog for a detailed list of other requirements.

The Minor
This minor is designed for the student who wishes to read; discuss; and enjoy novels, plays, stories, poetry, and literary theory as part of a broad liberal education. The minor in English Literature consists of a minimum of 24 credits:

6 courses/ 24 credits

Please note that students can choose between ENGL 201 or ENGL 202, must take one additional 200-level course, and four courses in literature numbered 300 or above. Please consult with a departmental advisor or the department chair in choosing these classes.

ENGL 201 Critical Reading (4 Credits)

An introduction to close critical reading of texts in several genres and to argument about literary texts. Students will attend to the characteristics and effects of literary language and will explore varieties of form, structure, style, and genre. They will also be introduced to a basic vocabulary of literary critical terms. 
Prerequisite: one 100-level literature course or comparable first-year seminar or by permission.

ENGL 202 Texts and Contexts (4 Credits)

This course builds on the interpretive strategies acquired in English 201. Students will develop the ability to place their own interpretations in conversation with those of other critics. They will be introduced to literary theory and its application to texts, as well as disciplinary research methods.  
Recommended: ENGL 201.

Advanced Placement in English

  • Students who score three, four, or five on the test for Advanced Placement in English Language and Composition will receive 4 credits for ENGL 102.
  • Students who score four or five on the test for Advanced Placement in English Literature and Composition will receive 4 credits for ENGL 112.

Sigma Tau Delta 
Majors and minors in English are eligible for membership in Sigma Tau Delta, an international honor society. Sigma Tau Delta serves as a way to recognize outstanding achievement, foster the love of writing and reading, and give members an opportunity to share those passions with the community around them through social activities and service projects of their own design.

To be eligible, students must have:
• completed three semesters of college.
• achieved a 3.5 GPA in the major/minor.
• ranked in the top third of their class for overall GPA.

Application materials are available in the English Department Office. Sigma Tau Delta is also open to Creative Writing majors and minors, as well as Johnston students with applicable emphases.

Awards
Each spring, the department awards the Eugene Kanjo Prize for Excellence in Literary Studies to a graduating senior for outstanding work in literary criticism. Students are invited by the faculty to apply for consideration.

Course Descriptions (ENGL)

Note: All English classes are offered for Numeric or Evaluation except for ENGL X04 and ENGL 498, which are offered for Credit/no credit only.

ENGL X04 Writing Studio (1 Credits)

Weekly, one-hour facilitated group workshop to analyze and discuss papers in development for other university courses. Study of student and professional texts to understand how rhetorical moves in writing vary by situation and genre. May be repeated for a maximum of four credits.
Credit/no credit only.

ENGL 100 Analytical Reading and Writing (4 Credits)

Introduction and practice in "having something to say" in response to academic texts. Equal attention to reading critically to interpret arguments and writing to participate in academic conversations. Students will practice purposeful reading, inferential reasoning, and revision of personal insights into arguable claims.

ENGL 102 Academic Writing Seminar (4 Credits)

Seminar in critical reading and analytical writing from sources, emphasizing writing as decision making throughout the writing process. Students will construct several claim-driven writing projects through repeated practice in generating, focusing, and refining ideas. Instruction in basic research strategies and citation conventions for arguments grounded in reference to other texts. Restricted grading option–students must earn a grade of 2.0 to receive credit.

ENGL 110 Poetry (4 Credits)

Introduction to poetry and creative expression. Examination of sound, rhythm, and majesty in poetry with a focus on how a poem speaks of our lives.

ENGL 112 Fiction (4 Credits)

Intensive study of the uses of language to convey and evoke experience. Readings are international in scope, including works of many cultures and countries. Assignments develop skills in analytical reading and writing.

ENGL 114 War in Literature and Film (4 Credits)

Exploration of ways in which war is reflected in literature and film, including a variety of genres. Consideration of ethical issues is integral to the course. Extensive writing and active class discussion are required.

ENGL 118 Literature of the Bible (3-4 Credits)

Introduction to the Old and New Testaments. Survey of the contents of the Bible and a study of the various types of literature included. Though this is not a course in Biblical history or criticism, the creation of the canon and critical stances from which the Bible can be read are noted.

ENGL 119 World Literature (4 Credits)

Examines texts written in English and/or in translation from a variety of national traditions within a global context. Focus will vary with instructor, but may include novels (Beowulf, Things Fall Apart), films (Rashomon, Persepolis), poetry, and drama (The Peony Pavilion, The Swamp-Dwellers).

ENGL 120 Contemporary Literature (4 Credits)

Cultures are continually reinvented by the people who live them, and literary culture is no different. This course focuses on the study of literature written by contemporary authors, and will consider the question of why reading new writing matters. Special attention to developing critical and analytical skills.

ENGL 126 Literary Inquiries (4 Credits)

Explores different kinds of literature–stories, poems, and plays–studying idiom and culture. In discussion, students discover new ways to interpret literature. In their critical writing, they investigate and employ the power of language. They acquire a grounding in the analytic practice for the serious study of literature.

ENGL 130 Literature of the Americas (4 Credits)

This course explores American literature broadly, whether defined by regional boundaries, such as nation or hemisphere, or cultural ones, such as identity, language, custom, or shared history. Covers multiple genres and periods. Special attention to developing skills in critical reading, literary analysis, and argumentative writing.

ENGL 161 Studies in Literature (3-4 Credits)

Selected topics, themes, or authors in literary fields. May be repeated for degree credit, given different topics, for a maximum of 8 credits.
Offered as needed.

ENGL 201 Critical Reading (4 Credits)

An introduction to close critical reading of texts in several genres and to argument about literary texts. Students will attend to the characteristics and effects of literary language and will explore varieties of form, structure, style, and genre. They will also be introduced to a basic vocabulary of literary critical terms. 
Prerequisite: one 100-level literature course or comparable first-year seminar or by permission.

ENGL 202 Texts and Contexts (4 Credits)

This course builds on the interpretive strategies acquired in English 201. Students will develop the ability to place their own interpretations in conversation with those of other critics. They will be introduced to literary theory and its application to texts, as well as disciplinary research methods.  
Recommended: ENGL 201.

ENGL 203 Intermediate Composition (4 Credits)

Practice in expository prose with emphasis on explanation, interpretation, and argument. Students write essays of varied length, complexity, and mode. Emphasis on understanding the writing process through drafting and revision. May be repeated for degree credit for a maximum of 8 credits.

ENGL 206 Composing in New Media (4 Credits)

Practice in modes of literacies enabled by new media. Introduction to a range of issues, theories, and practices relevant to working in new media environments. May include writing in digital environments, digital video, weblogs, document, and web design.

ENGL 208 Young Adult Fiction (4 Credits)

“YA” is a familiar, yet nebulous category of literature. This class will examine the rise and development of this genre, with attention to questions of representation and inclusivity. Students will develop strategies for interpretation, especially focused on thematic and symbolic readings, and analyzing varying perspectives and worldview. 
Offered in alternate years. 

ENGL 209 Fairy Tale Traditions and Innovations (3 Credits)

Fairy Tales have long pasts, and equally long shadows of influence. This class will introduce students to the origins of fairy and folk tales, and explore modern adaptations of iconic tales, with particular attention to questions of representation and inclusivity, and how folk and fairy tales critique power and inequality. 

ENGL 210 Poetry (4 Credits)

Exploration of the structures of lyric poetry, with a focus on rhythm, figuration, and tonality. Texts are chosen from a wide range of poets, with an ear for the sheer pleasure of poetic language.

ENGL 212 Fiction (4 Credits)

Survey of representative English, American, and European novels from the 18th century to the present.

ENGL 213 Drama (4 Credits)

Study of dramatic forms in various cultures and periods. May be repeated for degree credit given a different topic.

ENGL 215 Children’s Literature (3-4 Credits)

The stories we tell children can explain away fears or inculcate desired values or behaviors. Children’s stories also reveal how we define childhood (and adulthood). This course covers a range of literature from a variety of time periods and genres, analyzed from a variety of theoretical positions. 
Prerequisite: sophomore standing; one literature course recommended or by permission.

ENGL 216 Poetry East-West (4 Credits)

Comparative study of poetry from the Chinese, European, and American traditions. Attentive reading of poems from all periods with the aim of exploring similarities and differences between these two traditions. Introduction to theoretical disputes about what poetry is or does in both traditions and to issues in translation.

ENGL 217 Images of Women (3-4 Credits)

Focuses on representations of women and girls, and on the construction of gender in a variety of texts, and explores the critical significance of those representations. Primary texts (literature, film, and/or popular culture), historical periods, and critical approaches will vary depending on instructor.

ENGL 218 Graphic Novels and Comics (3 Credits)

Sequential narrative art, graphic novels, and comics are increasingly important ways that stories about worldviews and power are told. Content of this course varies by instructor, ranging from graphic adaptations of literary texts, to autobiographies told through the visual narrative, to the implications of the superhero comic. JNST welcome. 

ENGL 221 Shakespeare to 1600 (4 Credits)

The first semester, Shakespeare to 1600, covers early plays and the sonnets, the literary traditions, and backgrounds of the plays, Shakespeare's language and theater.

ENGL 222 Shakespeare after 1600 (4 Credits)

The first semester, Shakespeare to 1600, covers early plays and the sonnets, the literary traditions and backgrounds of the plays, and Shakespeare’s language and theatre. The second semester covers plays written after 1600 with emphasis on interpreting irony and tragedy through dramatic structure and imagery.

ENGL 223 Shakespeare in Adaptation (4 Credits)

In this course, Shakespeare’s works will be paired with the imitations, spin-offs, adaptations, and parodies they have inspired. Questions of the choice and implications of adaptation will be addressed, as well as generic conventions and the relationship of literature, history, and politics. 
Prerequisite: sophomore standing or by permission.

ENGL 230 American Jewish Literature (4 Credits)

Introduction to American Jewish literature from the 19th century forward. Covers genres including poetry, drama, and film, with strong emphasis on fiction. Explores Jewish writing in the U.S. in relation to immigration; the labor movement; the Holocaust and orthodoxy; and Jewishness at the crossroads of race, ethnicity, religion, and culture. 
Offered as needed.

ENGL 233 African-American Literature (4 Credits)

Literature from the 18th century to the present. Major trends and themes are examined from historical, social, and psychological perspectives.

ENGL 236 Science, Colonialism, Postcolonialism (4 Credits)

Class examines intersection of science, imperialism, and post-colonialism. It explores images of disease and hygiene in various forms of medical, bio-political, literary, and popular cultures. Areas of study may include literature, film, social medicine history, medical policy, history, and material cultures. Topics may include: HIV/AIDS, malaria, public health, and blood. 
Prerequisites: one prior literature class, or by permission. 

ENGL 237 Immigrant Literature (4 Credits)

Introduction to literature of U.S. immigration from the 19th century to the present. We will explore immigrant experience in terms of race, ethnicity, and national identity; cultural, religious, gender, and generational tensions; and assimilation in theory and practice, from the perspectives of those in the process of becoming Americans. 
Offered as needed.

ENGL 238 Literature by Women of Color (4 Credits)

The course analyzes the political roles of women of color in national and international contexts as reflected in their writing. It examines the diverse ways that gender resistance takes shape in different social, economic, cultural, and political contexts. Themes include neocolonialism and neoliberalism, globalization, and sexual differences. 
Offered as needed. 

ENGL 239 Chicana/o Literature (4 Credits)

Serves as an introduction to contemporary Chicana/o literature, emphasizing historical and cultural contexts. This class will focus on a body of work that emerges from the Chicana/o movement in the 1960s and continues to evolve as an expression of artistic and sociopolitical self-determination. 
Offered as needed.

ENGL 242 Studies in Language (4 Credits)

Topics vary and include introduction to linguistics; history of English; linguistic approaches to literary criticism; bilingualism and issues in sociolinguistics; innate concepts, hard-wired grammar, language, and the brain; metaphoric and literal language; and history of approaches (e.g., Plato, Augustine, Condillac, Saussure, Chomsky, Kristeva). May be repeated for credit given different topics for a maximum of 8 credits. 
Offered as needed.

ENGL 250 Theories of Popular Culture (4 Credits)

Why should we take popular culture seriously, and how do we read it critically? An introduction to the methods, issues, and theories developed and applied within the interdisciplinary field of Cultural Studies, including semiotics, structuralist and post-structuralist approaches, ideological analyses, as well as feminist and ethnic studies-based methods.
Offered as needed.

ENGL 251 South Asian Literary Cultures (4 Credits)

Exploration of South Asian literature, with a focus on the contemporary. Covers the cultural, historical, and political contexts of British colonialism and its effects on literary cultures of India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka. Topics may include caste, gender, globalization, sexualities, and film cultures in South Asia and its diasporas.

ENGL 256 Native American Literature (4 Credits)

Introduction to contemporary Native American literature. Covers a breadth of genres: essays, poetry, short fiction, and film. Historical, cultural, and political approaches will shape class discussions, and students will engage in extensive textual analysis. We will consider carefully the role of American Indian women writers in this evolving tradition. 
Offered as needed.

ENGL 261 Studies in Literature (3-4 Credits)

Selected topics, themes, or authors in literary fields. May be repeated for degree credit for a maximum of 8 credits given different topics.
Offered as needed.

ENGL 262 Literature Travel Course (3 Credits)

Travel seminar featuring the reading of selected texts from various places and times. Visits to literary sites, theatre performances, museum or archival work, and other immersion experiences are followed by discussions and other relevant assignments.

ENGL 302 Writing About Literature (4 Credits)

Advanced practice in analyzing rhetorical situations to understand the conventions at work. Attention to developing a greater sensitivity to language through critical reading of complex and varied texts. Students explore the conventions of academic prose genres through intensive drafting and revision.
Prerequisites: completion of the WA requirement and sophomore standing or by permission.

ENGL 308 Mentoring College Writers (4 Credits)

Introduction to Writing Studies and the theory and practice of mentoring college writers. Course includes applied practice in group and individual tutoring. 
Prerequisite: Completion of the WA requirement.

ENGL 309 Writing in the Public Sphere (4 Credits)

An advanced topics course in writing and rhetoric examining genre boundaries and variations in written discourse primarily outside the academy. Topics might include public advocacy, alternative rhetorics, the ethics of representation, and non-canonical argument paradigms (feminist, moral, post-modern, etc.). Because this is a writing course, study and practice of writing genres appropriate to the topic will be central to the course. 
Prerequisite: Completion of the WA requirement, junior or senior standing, or by permission.

ENGL 311 Film and Literature (4 Credits)

Study of the practice and theory of adapting film from literature, demonstrated in select literary works made into feature films. 
Recommended: MVC 111 or by permission.

ENGL 317 Women’s Literature (3-4 Credits)

Focuses on literature written by women and why that particular focus matters to us as readers and critics. Students will engage in extensive textual analysis of both creative and critical texts. Historical periods, critical approaches, and national traditions will vary, depending on the instructor.
Recommended: ENGL 201 OR ENGL 202.

ENGL 320 Medieval Literature (4 Credits)

Course focuses on literary works from the Old and Middle English periods, but includes works written on the Continent and is interdisciplinary in approach, incorporating linguistics, manuscript studies, discussion of oral versus written culture, Gregorian chant, the Bayeux Tapestry, an archaeological dig, and court documents in our literary study. Primary sources from literature, philosophy, and art.
Recommended: ENGL 201 OR ENGL 202.

ENGL 321 Renaissance Literature (4 Credits)

Study of an exuberant period, characterized by zeal for new learning, for mastering the demands of the physical world, and for scholarship, art, and ethics. Course readings provide different perspectives of the Renaissance as you witness characters and actions and study them within their historical context. 
Recommended: ENGL 201 OR ENGL 202.

ENGL 322 The Eighteenth Century: Regicides, Libertines, Bluestockings, and Fops (4 Credits)

From 1660–1820, British culture was characterized by fear of invasion, scientific experiment, political debate, “shopping,” colonial expansion, and anxieties about how to control all of this novelty. Explores dynamic literary, philosophical, and cultural energies shaping the precursor of our modern world.
Recommended: ENGL 201 OR ENGL 202.

ENGL 323 The Romantics (4 Credits)

We will explore different kinds of Romantic imagination through topics such as the intertextuality of William Wordsworth, Dorothy Wordsworth; Coleridge, Blake, and Byron’s eccentric long poems; and the ways in which Jane Austen and Mary Wollstonecraft responded to the “woman question.”
Recommended: ENGL 201 OR ENGL 202.
Offered as needed.

ENGL 324 Victorian Literature (4 Credits)

Study of a complex age of expansion and power and of the growth of the novel, as well as experimentation in poetic forms. Topic and texts vary. 
Recommended: ENGL 201 OR ENGL 202.
Offered as needed.

ENGL 325 Modernism (4 Credits)

Study of modernist writers from both sides of the Atlantic through topics such as the role of the “little magazine” and the visual arts, gender, the materiality of language, and more. Representative writers include Djuna Barnes, T.S. Eliot, D.H. Lawrence, James Joyce, Gertrude Stein, W. C. Williams, and Virginia Woolf. 
Recommended: ENGL 201 OR ENGL 202.
Offered as needed.

ENGL 330 American Literature 1620–1860: Republicans and Revolutionaries (4 Credits)

Exploration of major movements and themes from America’s beginnings to the Civil War. Includes Puritanism, Transcendentalism, Romanticism, the radical creation of the republic, and the search for an American identity, as well as careful study of some of the best American writing through the first half of the 19th century.
Recommended: ENGL 201 OR ENGL 202.

ENGL 331 American Literature: Industry and Enterprise (4 Credits)

Between the Civil War and World War I, America experiences a “golden age,” a “gilded age,” and an “age of industry.” In what manner, and on whose terms, does America come to recognize itself and its experience? May include works by Whitman, Dickinson, Chestnut, Twain, James, Wharton, Crane, and Dreiser. 
Recommended: ENGL 201 OR ENGL 202.

ENGL 332 American Literature: Making It New (4 Credits)

Examination of American literature from World War I and the beginnings of modernism through post-modern and contemporary poetry and prose. This course will explore the American identities articulated—and subverted—in 20th-century literature, and will examine stylistic innovation in writers from T.S. Eliot and Jean Toomer to Toni Morrison and John Ashbury. 
Recommended: ENGL 201 OR ENG 202.

ENGL 333 Topics in African Diasporic Literatures (3-4 Credits)

This course allows students to extend their knowledge of African-American literature and to study in depth a topic related to African-diasporic literatures. The selection of topics will vary depending on the instructor, but may include questions of representation, transnationalism, sexuality, and the influences of critical theory. 
Prerequisite: ENGL 201 OR ENGL 202 recommended. 
Offered as needed.

ENGL 334 Representing the Holocaust (4 Credits)

This course examines a range of Holocaust representations in memoirs, diaries, fiction, poetry, film, and historiography. Explores themes of bearing witness, trauma and the work of memory, fiction and history, and the contradictions between ethics and aesthetics.
Prerequisite: ENGL 201 OR ENGL 202 recommended.
Offered as needed.

ENGL 351 Postcolonial, Global, & Transnational Literatures (4 Credits)

Survey of critical and creative texts from nations that have experienced colonization by European empires, particularly Britain. Studies how national, cultural, and individual identities have been radically altered by this experience. Themes include identity, power, migration, race, gender, representation and resistance. Pays close attention to social, cultural and historical contexts. 
Prerequisite: ENGL 201 OR ENGL 202 recommended.

ENGL 361 Studies in Literature (4 Credits)

Selected topics in literary figures and themes.
Prerequisite: ENGL 201 OR ENGL 202 recommended.

ENGL 362 Single-Author Seminar (3-4 Credits)

Studying a single author in depth, situating his or her works in the social, historical, and literary context. Authors include figures from any point in the Anglophone literary tradition, including Chaucer, Milton, Austen, Dickens, Melville, Joyce, Woolf, Faulkner, Williams, Merrill, Morrison, Rushdie, and many others. May be repeated for degree credit, given different topic, maximum 8 credits.
Prerequisite: ENGL 201 OR ENGL 202 recommended. 

ENGL 402 History of Literary Criticism and Theory (4 Credits)

Survey of literary criticism from ancient times to the middle of the 20th century. Combines representative readings of influential critics with imaginative writing. 
Prerequisite: junior standing or by permission.

ENGL 403 Contemporary Literary Criticism and Theory (4 Credits)

Exploration of representative schools of current literary theory. Topics may vary, but the course is a combination of theory with readings in fiction and poetry. 
Prerequisite: junior standing or by permission.

ENGL 420 Senior Seminar in Literature (4 Credits)

Capstone course designed to allow students to reflect upon and synthesize their work in the major. Requirements include a portfolio of representative work, with a reflective narrative; a teaching component; and a research supported essay demonstrating substantial new work, whether a revision of a previous essay or a new undertaking. 
Prerequisite: senior standing recommended.

ENGL 498 Honors Independent Research (1-4 Credits)

Independent thesis research and writing as part of an approved honors project. Each student will research and write a thesis under the supervision of an honors committee chaired by a department faculty member. Students will be granted honors upon completion of a successful oral defense and any required revisions.
Prerequisite: ENGL 420 and by permission only.
Credit/no credit only.