University Academic Standards

The following policies apply University-wide. Please refer to the Academic Standards Chapters of the College of Arts and Sciences, the School of Education, and the School of Business for policies specific to those schools.

Academic Records

Public Information 
The University of Redlands maintains student records in compliance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (as amended) (FERPA), which assures students and parents of their right to privacy of information.

The following is considered public information and may be released or published without the student’s consent:

Student name, date, and place of birth; major field of study; dates of attendance; degrees, honors, and awards received; most recent educational institution attended; campus address and student-assigned e-mail address; home address and telephone number; cell phone number; participation in special academic programs; participation in recognized student activities; participation in officially recognized sports; class level, weight, and height of athletic team members. 

Students who wish the above information withheld must sign a request to that effect in the Registrar’s Office.

Release of Academic Information 
Confidential information is defined as any information not included in the Public Information section above. Current University policy makes accessible to parents or legal guardians copies of their dependent’s academic record when a written request and proof of dependency are submitted to the Registrar’s Office. The University will not release confidential information for independent students (students over the age of 23 or defined as “independent” by University Financial Aid Policy) without the written request of the student. A copy of the University of Redlands policy on student records can be obtained from the Registrar’s Office.

Review of Academic Records
Students wishing to review their academic records must make a written request to the Registrar’s Office, listing the item or items of interest in advance.

Transcripts
A transcript of a student’s complete academic record is issued only upon the student’s signed request. Transcripts will be withheld if the student is financially obligated to the University or has obligations under financial aid contracts.

Students should allow two to five business days for processing. See the appropriate Tuition and Fees section of this Catalog for the cost of transcripts.

Transcripts submitted to the University of Redlands for admission or credit transfer become the property of the University of Redlands and cannot be returned to the student, copied, or forwarded to other institutions.

Student Records
The University maintains student records under the name the student had when last enrolled. A former student/alumni may not change the name on his or her permanent record except by presenting a signed request and a certified copy of the signed court order showing the authorized name change.

Recording of Degrees
University degrees are conferred four times each year. Degrees are conferred on the first official conferral date after degree requirements (required coursework, non-coursework, and necessary supporting documents) are completed.

Academic records are sealed thirty days after the conferral of a degree. After this date, changes to majors and minors, addition of departmental honors, removal of incompletes, grade changes, or other changes to an academic record cannot be made.

The official dates are as follows:

Commencement day
May 31
August 31
December 31

Course Syllabi
University policy requires that instructors provide a syllabus to all students at the beginning of each course. The syllabus must include course objectives, an outline of the topics to be covered, a schedule (by date or topic) of major quizzes and examinations, the due dates of major assignments, and a detailed statement of grading explaining how test and assignment scores are translated into reportable grades. The syllabus must also state the minimum requirements for receiving credit in the course. (See Credit/No Credit Grading Option.)

Capstone Requirement
In all degree and some non-degree programs at the University of Redlands, students must complete a capstone requirement prior to graduation. Capstone projects represent the culmination of students’ academic accomplishments. Capstone activities offer students the opportunity to synthesize topics and practice skills learned in their academic programs. The nature of capstone projects varies, but they should represent students’ best practices in their fields of study.

Classification of Students

Enrollment Status
Enrollment status is determined as follows:

Undergraduate: 
Full time: 12 credits
Three-quarter time: 9 credits
Halftime: 6 credits

Graduate: 
Full time: 6 credits
Three-quarter time: 4.5 credits
Halftime: 3 credits

Based on four-month terms of January through April, May through August, and September through December.

Undergraduate Standing 

Class Level
Students are classified by level based on academic credits completed:

Freshman 0–31
Sophomore 32–63
Junior 64–95
Senior 96 or more

Graduate Standing Classifications  
There are four classifications of graduate students: (1) Regular, (2) Provisional, (3) Limited, and (4) Special Status. All students working toward a degree must be admitted to either regular or provisional standing.

Regular Graduate Standing
(1) Regular graduate standing is a prerequisite for acceptance to candidacy for a master’s degree and is granted by the appropriate dean upon recommendation from the director or chair of the program for which application is made. The basic requirements for Regular Graduate Standing are as follows:

  • bachelor or higher-level degree from a regionally accredited college or university;
  • a minimum undergraduate GPA of at least 2.5 on a scale of 4.0 (Note: some programs may require a higher minimum GPA.); and
  • maintenance of a satisfactory academic standing. (See the section titled “Graduate Academic Standing” in this chapter.)

Provisional Graduate Standing
(2) Provisional graduate standing may be granted to a student for one of the following reasons:

1) application for Regular Graduate Standing is incomplete for reasons beyond the applicant’s control (applicants should be cautioned that this applies in very few instances), or
2) a decision is made by program faculty to evaluate more of a student’s work before recommending Regular Graduate Standing. Provisional graduate standing may be granted for no more than one term or four courses for either full-time or part-time students, and registration is limited to a maximum of 12 credits before achieving regular graduate standing.

Limited Graduate Standing
(3) Limited graduate standing may be granted to a student who is approved as a credential candidate in education or to applicants for full-time, non-degree study. However, for those who later seek regular graduate standing, no more than 6 credits earned under limited graduate standing may be applied toward a degree program.

Special Status Graduate Standing
(4) Special status graduate standing is available only to students who are taking individual courses on a part-time basis and do not intend to become candidates for a degree or credential program. Departments set their own criteria for special status graduate students. However, for those who later seek regular graduate standing, no more than 6 credits earned under Special Graduate Standing may be applied toward a degree program.

Advanced undergraduates who do not qualify for any type of graduate standing may take graduate courses only with the permission of the chair of the program, obtained by means of a form submitted at the time of registration.

Candidacy
Some programs require students intending to complete a master’s degree to file a petition for candidacy and submit it for review and approval by the program faculty and appropriate dean. At least 15 credits must be completed at the University of Redlands after the petition is approved. All remaining requirements for the degree must be completed within a period of three to five years—depending on the program. Refer to individual programs for more details.

Graduate Academic Standing 
A minimum cumulative GPA of 3.00 (based on a 4.00 scale) in all graduate work taken at the University of Redlands is required to qualify for a degree. A student whose cumulative GPA falls below 3.00 at the end of any term will be placed on probation and allowed one term to restore the cumulative grade point average to 3.00. Any student who fails to restore his or her cumulative GPA to 3.00 at the end of the probationary period will be academically disqualified. Academic disqualification also occurs if a student receives one grade of 0.0 or two grades of 1.0.

Credit for a course graded below 2.0 (under the numerical grade option) cannot be applied toward a graduate degree. However, the course may be retaken with the second grade determining acceptability toward both the degree and the grade point average. The first grade will remain on the student’s permanent record but will not become part of the cumulative grade point average. 

Theses are graded only as High Pass, Pass, or Fail, as determined by the examining committee upon completion of the oral examination. Such grades are not included in the calculation of the GPA, nor are they recorded on the transcript.

Academic Credit Definition

One unit of semester credit is awarded for the amount of work an average student would accomplish in a minimum of 40 hours (undergraduate) and 45 hours (graduate), including the hours spent in the laboratory or classroom.

Credit by Examination

Undergraduate
Any degree-seeking student in good standing may challenge courses by examination. Departments may specify certain courses as inappropriate for credit by examination, but must permit full-time students in good standing to challenge any course not specified as unavailable for challenge. In challenging a course, the student must be prepared to demonstrate appropriate knowledge of the material covered without any guidance or direction by a faculty member. The appropriate knowledge should not be less than a 2.0 level of competency (more stringent requirements may be set by individual instructors). Courses previously taken or audited may not be challenged. No credit is given when the purpose of an examination is to determine the proper level at which students should begin their studies (e.g., in art, music, foreign language, or mathematics).

Upon payment of a processing fee, students who satisfy a course by challenge will receive the approved credit on their academic record and a mark of C.E. Grades and grade points will not be given. No entry of any type will be made on the academic record if the examination is failed. For more information, see the Tuition and Fees section of this Catalog.

Credit by Examination Limit
For all undergraduates, a maximum of 16 credits from such successful challenges may be applied toward the baccalaureate degree. A challenge to a major program course must be completed at least six weeks before the particular course is to begin. Students should contact the appropriate department chair for information on this option.

Graduate
A graduate student in good standing may obtain up to 3-course credits by special examination in courses offered by the University of Redlands. Application for credit by examination must be made in advance to the appropriate dean. That approval, along with that of the department concerned and a receipt from the Office of Business and Finance indicating payment of a special fee, are necessary before the examination may be taken.

Credit Obsolescence

Graduate Level
No course that has been completed more than six years before the date of graduation will be counted toward a University of Redlands master’s degree. 

Grading Systems

Undergraduate Grading System

4.0 or 3.7
Outstanding. The student displayed exceptional grasp of the material, frequently with evidence of intellectual insight and original thought.

3.3, 3.0, or 2.7
Excellent. The student's work demonstrated a thorough grasp of the material with occasional errors and omissions. Assignments were thoroughly and completely done, with careful attention to detail and clarity and with evidence of intellectual insight.

2.3, 2.0, or 1.7
Acceptable. The quality of work was acceptable, meeting minimal course standards, but was not exceptional. Performance on examinations and other assignments was satisfactory and demonstrated that the student was keeping up with the material and attending to detail.

1.3, 1.0, or 0.7
Poor. The quality of work was not always satisfactory but overall was passing. Assigned work was not always done or, when done, was inadequate. Performance on examinations and other work was generally weak with regard to understanding of subject, proper formulation of ideas, and thoroughness.

0.0
Failing. A grade of “F” indicates that the student failed the course. The quality and/or quantity of work was not of college level. A failing grade may be assigned for a variety of reasons such as failure to complete course requirements as outlined in the syllabus, inability to comprehend course material or ineptitude in dealing with it, consistently unsatisfactory performance on examinations and/or assignments, or excessive absences.

CR Grade of 2.0 or better in CN course
NC Grade below 2.0 in CN course
I Incomplete
AU Audit
CE Credit by Examination
W Withdraw
EV Evaluation included in academic record
VZ Evaluation satisfactory, not yet in file
VI Incomplete Evaluation
VF Failure to complete terms of evaluation contract
Z No grade submitted by instructor (a temporary grade)

Graduate Grading System 

4.0 or 3.7
Outstanding. The student displayed exceptional grasp of the material, frequently with evidence of intellectual insight and original thought.

3.3 or 3.0
Excellent. The student's work demonstrated a thorough grasp of the material with occasional errors and omissions. Assignments were thoroughly and completely done, with careful attention to detail and clarity and with evidence of intellectual insight.

2.7, 2.3, or 2.0
Acceptable. The quality of work was acceptable, meeting minimal course standards, but was not exceptional. Performance on examinations and other assignments was satisfactory and demonstrated that the student was keeping up with the material and attending to detail.

Graduate students will not receive credit for a course awarded a grade of 1.7 or below. A cumulative grade point average below 3.0 is not sufficient for good standing in graduate programs.

1.7, 1.3, 1.0, 0.7, 0.0
Unacceptable for graduate credit.

CR Grade of 2.7 or better in CN course
NC Grade below 2.7 in CN course
I Incomplete
AU Audit
CE Credit by Examination
W Withdraw
Z No grade submitted by instructor (a temporary grade)

Grading System Options 

Numeric Grade Option 
It is assumed that all courses are taken for a numeric grade. Arts and Sciences students may choose an alternate grading option (Credit/No Credit or Evaluation), if it is available and if they do so by the deadline published in the Academic Calendar. Courses in the major and those taken to fulfill Liberal Arts Foundation/Liberal Arts Inquiry requirements must be taken for a numeric grade, except in those instances where the course is offered on a Credit/No Credit basis only or when the instructor has agreed to provide a narrative evaluation. School of Business students may choose an alternate grading option, if it is available, only for independent studies that do not fulfill degree program requirements. The alternate grading option must be declared at the time of registration.

Evaluation Option 
A student may receive, by agreement with the professor, a written evaluation of work in any course. The evaluation becomes part of the student’s permanent academic record.

Credit/No Credit Grading Option 
Grades of CR (Credit) and NC (No Credit) do not enter into the computation of a student’s grade point average (GPA). University policy requires that the quality of work must be equivalent to a grade of 2.0 or better for an undergraduate and 2.7 or better for a graduate student to receive “Credit.” More stringent requirements may be set by individual instructors. Arts and Sciences students may elect to take only one course of up to 6 credits for Credit/No Credit in any one semester. Catalog courses offered on a Credit/No Credit only basis are not included in this total.

Incomplete Grades (I)
An instructor may submit a grade of Incomplete (I) when coursework is of acceptable quality but has not been finished because of illness or some other extraordinary circumstance. It is not given for poor or neglected work. If no alternate grade is provided, a grade of 0.0 or NC, as appropriate, is recorded automatically on the incomplete deadline date. Arts and Sciences students should refer to the Academic Calendar for the deadline. Arts and Sciences students cross-registered in School of Business or School of Education courses must meet the School of Business and School of Education deadline. School of Business and School of Education students cross-registered in Arts and Sciences courses must meet the Arts and Sciences deadline.

Courses

Prerequisite Courses
For admission to a course that requires a prerequisite, a student must either have satisfactorily completed a prerequisite course with a grade of 1.7 or higher or must obtain the consent of the instructor. More stringent requirements may be set by individual departments.

Repeated Courses
A student may repeat any course, but only the grade and credits earned the second, or latest, time are counted toward graduation and in the cumulative and semester GPAs. Notation of the first or earlier attempts remains on the academic record. Courses may be repeated only for the same grading option as when the course was initially taken. Students must inform the Registrar’s Office when they repeat a course. Schools, departments, or programs may place additional restrictions on repeating courses more than once. Repeating courses outside of the University of Redlands does not remove transcript notations of courses previously taken at the University of Redlands.

Transfer Credit

Minimum Grade
The minimum grade needed to transfer an undergraduate course from a regionally accredited institution to the University of Redlands is a 2.0 (C). The minimum grade needed to transfer a graduate course from a regionally accredited institution to the University of Redlands is 3.0 (B).

College Credit Earned in High School 
Many high schools have arrangements with nearby post-secondary institutions, allowing students to take regular college courses while still in high school. The University of Redlands will accept credits for transferable courses if the courses are posted for credits on the transcript of the college where the courses were taken. Regardless of how many college credits are earned before graduation from high school, the student must go through the application process required of all entering freshmen.

Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate
The University of Redlands will grant credit for Advanced Placement Tests and International Baccalaureate courses. For Advanced Placement Tests, each department assigning credit establishes its own requirement for a level of acceptance and number of credits accepted. The minimum level of acceptance is a score of three. Please refer to individual departments for further details.

For International Baccalaureate higher-level courses, several departments have established their own requirements for a level of acceptance and number of credits accepted. The minimum level of acceptance is a score of five. Scores of five and six may earn 4 credits and scores of seven may earn 8 credits. Please refer to individual departments for further details.

The maximum amount of credit accepted through Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate is the equivalent of 32-semester credits.

Veteran Responsibilities
Veterans or their dependents may be entitled to Veterans Administration education benefits as students of the University of Redlands. Veterans who receive VA educational benefits are responsible for notifying the VA Certifying Official at the University of Redlands of any change in academic program, class load, address, marital, or dependent status. 

Questions about benefits or status should be directed to the VA Certifying Official by calling (909) 748-8478.

Disputed Grades Policy
The grade an instructor awards cannot be changed by anyone other than the instructor of record. A disputed grade given by a University of Redlands instructor may be appealed to the Academic Review Board (ARB) for mediation and resolution. Decisions of the Board in such cases are final and are not subject to further appeal. If the appeal is approved, the ARB may recommend that the student’s registration for the course be changed to the Credit/No Credit grade option and recorded as CR (Credit) or NC (No Credit) as appropriate given the instructor’s grade. Credit and No Credit grades are not computed in GPAs. (See Credit/No Credit Grading Option.)

Grounds for Appealing Grades
The following are considered grounds for appeal of a grade:

1. capricious and inconsistent grading standards;
2. significant deviation from criteria stated in the course syllabus;
3. personal vindictiveness or prejudice on the part of the instructor;
4. gross professional incompetence or grossly unprofessional behavior on the part of the instructor; or
5. unreasonable expectations or requirements made by an instructor that are grossly inconsistent with standard practice and expectations.

Decisions Regarding the Appeal of Grades
The burden of proof rests entirely with the petitioner. The decision of the committee, which is final, includes the following options:

1. no action, in which case the disputed grade will stand;
2. change of grading option to Credit/No Credit. Credit is awarded for 2.0 or higher (undergraduate) or 2.7 or higher (graduate); or
3. withdrawal from the course. The student’s transcript will reflect a “W” for the course.

If a change of grading option is permitted by the Board, a letter explaining the change will be held in the student’s file. Under these circumstances, a change to Credit does not affect the applicability of the course to major requirements or, for Arts and Sciences students, to Liberal Arts Foundation/Liberal Arts Inquiry requirements.

Procedure
The following steps must be taken for an appeal to be reviewed by the Board. Petitions that do not follow procedures will not be considered.

1. The student first should discuss any complaints with the instructor.

2. If the student remains dissatisfied, she or he should contact the department chair or program director, who may review the case and attempt to mediate the dispute.

3. If a dispute remains unresolved, an appeal may be brought to the ARB.

4. Appeals of grades must be filed no later than six weeks into the following semester for Arts and Sciences students or six weeks following the end of the class in question for School of Business and School of Education students. Appeals must be submitted in writing. Supporting documents and statements by others must be filed at the same time as the petition.

5. The chair of the Academic Review Board will invite a written response from the instructor involved.

6. Policy does not permit individuals to appear concerning any case except those involving academic honesty. The Board acts only on written statements and documentation.

7. Results of the appeal are communicated by the chair of the Board to the petitioner, faculty member(s) involved, Office of Academic Affairs, and the Registrar’s Office.

Submission of a petition indicates that the student understands the disputed grade policy and agrees to accept the ARB’s decision.

Academic Honesty
Academic honesty stands at the center of intellectual pursuits in the academic community. Faculty and student scholarship in all forms, individual and collaborative, expresses our understanding and esteem for intellectual honesty. Nurturing and sustaining a climate of honesty are the responsibilities of every member of the community. This policy statement includes standards of academic honesty, obligations and responsibilities of the members of the academic community for cultivating a climate of academic honesty, violations of academic honesty, and the procedures for addressing academic dishonesty.

I. Standards of Academic Honesty

Basic standards of honesty and academic integrity include, but are not limited to:

1. independently producing all homework, papers, laboratory reports, computer files on disks, and examinations submitted under one’s own name;

2. properly and appropriately referencing all work that draws on the ideas, words, and work of others to credit those thinkers;

3. identifying the co-authors or co-contributors of all work done in collaboration;

4. completing examinations without giving or receiving assistance or tampering with the examination;

5. submitting one’s own original work for each course;

6. respecting computer software copyrights, computer security systems, and file privacy of individuals, and protecting computer system performance;

7. accurately and completely disclosing research data, manuscripts, books or other documents, academic records/ credentials, transcripts, and letters of recommendation; and

8. allowing equal access to any library materials and comparable or related academic resources.

II. Obligations and Responsibilities for Cultivating a Climate of Honesty

Faculty and administrators are expected to:

1. work together to design orientation and first-year experiences that introduce students to academic life, to the “currency of ideas” that fuel our intellectual pursuits, and to University standards. Experiences that make independent intellectual work possible are engaging in intellectual discussion, learning how to use the library and obtain academic assistance, learning how to engage in research, referencing the work of others, and becoming familiar with the Catalog (students should consult the University library resources on how to reference the ideas of others and avoid plagiarism in academic writing. Library references are noted online at library.redlands.edu/cite);

2. demonstrate intellectual honesty in their individual research as well as in their use of others’ work and ideas (careful referencing of sources used for lectures and hand-out materials provides students with examples of intellectual honesty that communicate more than speeches and printed policies);

3. promote discussions of ideas, including a recognition and consideration of majority and minority perspectives (seldom is there only one perspective on a topic; intellectual honesty includes a recognition of various points of view);

4. clearly delineate the parameters on homework, labs, and group projects in the syllabus of each course (syllabi are course-specific, and faculty need not restate University policies stated in the Catalog; faculty should make efforts to communicate clearly the learning objectives to be achieved and to explain how work will be graded; questions about collaboration and assistance should be discussed in the classroom);

5. include statements about academic honesty with examinations, if they so choose, as a way of bringing students face-to-face with standards of academic honesty (each opportunity to declare oneself as working honestly reinforces the standards to which we are committed as a community);

6. act on cases of suspected violations of academic honesty as outlined below in section IV.1.

Students are expected to:

1. prepare adequately for all academic exercises (thorough preparation will decrease the temptation of cheating);

2. make sure they understand the parameters on assignments in each course;

3. condemn acts of academic dishonesty on the part of others (this includes a responsibility to report suspected violations of academic honesty as outlined below in section IV.2);

4. refuse to cheat or assist others in dishonest acts (this includes a responsibility to ensure that others may not cheat for them).

III. Violations of Academic Honesty
Academic dishonesty is any act that subverts or compromises the integrity of instruction or research. This includes knowingly assisting any person in the commission of such an act. Offenses include, but are not limited to, the acts described in sections 1 through 4 below.

1. Misrepresenting one’s background or abilities by:

A. falsifying, misusing, omitting, or tampering with information (written, oral, or electronic)—such as test scores, transcripts, letters of recommendation, resumes, statements of purpose, or any other document—to gain initial or continued access to the University’s programs or facilities;

B. offering as one’s own work the words, ideas, or arguments of another person without appropriate attribution by quotation, reference, or footnote—including, but not limited to, plagiarism (plagiarism occurs when the words of another are reproduced without acknowledgment or when the ideas or arguments of another are paraphrased and presented in such a way as to lead the reader to believe that they originated with the writer; it is the responsibility of all University students to understand the methods of proper attribution and to apply those principles in all written submissions);

C. bringing to an examination or using crib sheets, supplemental notes, or comparable aids during an examination except as specifically permitted by the instructor;

D. unauthorized communication during an examination or unauthorized collaboration in the presentation of reports, laboratory reports, or take-home examinations; copying or giving aid, or otherwise failing to abide by the University’s or instructor’s rules governing the exercise or examination without the instructor’s specific permission;

E. soliciting, obtaining, possessing, or providing to another person an examination or portions of an examination prior or subsequent to the administration of the examination without the authorization of the instructor;

F. acquiring from other persons, commercial organizations, or other sources (e.g., electronic sources)—or using unauthorized assistance and submitting as one’s own work—term papers, research papers, computer files, or comparable documents prepared in whole or in part by others;

G. submitting work in the name of another student or arranging for another student to substitute for oneself during an examination or in the completion of coursework;

H. falsifying data collected in the conduct of research or presenting falsified data in papers, manuscripts, books, or other documents submitted for publication or for course or degree requirements;

I. presenting the same or substantially the same written work—term paper, research report, essay or the like—as part of the course requirement for more than one course, without the express prior written permission of each instructor involved.

2. Impeding fair and equal access to the educational and research process by:

A. altering or changing an examination or comparable document so as to mislead other users or readers;

B. infringing upon the right of others to fair and equal access to any library materials and comparable or related academic resources, including tampering with or damaging any library materials or comparable academic resources (written or electronic);

C. attempting to prevent access by other users to the University’s computer system and its resources, attempting to degrade the computer system’s performance, or attempting to copy or destroy files or programs without authorization.

3. Misrepresenting one’s relationship with the University by:

A. altering, changing, forging, or misusing academic records or any official University form regarding oneself or others;

B. causing any false information to be presented at an academic proceeding or intentionally destroying evidence important to an academic proceeding;

4. Offering bribes (e.g., monetary remuneration, gifts, or favors) to any University representative in exchange for special consideration or waiver of procedures.

IV. Procedures for Addressing Academic Dishonesty

1. Procedures for Addressing Faculty Academic Dishonesty

A. Reporting Alleged Offenses Against Academic Honesty. When a member of the University community suspects an incident of faculty academic dishonesty, documentary evidence or other means supporting that suspicion will be reported to the dean of the appropriate school or college. The dean will refer the case to the Faculty Review Committee within one week for further review and investigation.

B. Sanctions. The Faculty Review Committee must notify the accused member of the University community of the charges within two weeks; within two weeks from the date of notification, the accused person must acknowledge receipt of the charges and work with the chair of the committee to determine a mutually agreed upon timetable for disposition of the case. Upon the recommendation of the Faculty Review Committee, a faculty member found to be in violation of the University Academic Honesty Policy is subject to sanctions up to and including dismissal under the guidelines and provisions specified in the appropriate section (Dismissal) of the University of Redlands Faculty Handbook.

C. Appeals. The decision rendered by the Faculty Review Committee can be appealed to the Faculty Grievance Committee within two weeks of the decision. (See the appropriate section of the University of Redlands Faculty Handbook.)

2. Procedures for Addressing Student Academic Dishonesty

A. Reporting Alleged Offenses Against Academic Honesty. Faculty are expected to report alleged offenses in a timely manner. When a faculty member suspects an incident of academic dishonesty and establishes through conversation, documentary evidence, or other means that the suspicion is reasonable, the faculty member must contact the Registrar to determine if it is a first offense. The Registrar checks the student’s file to see if there is documentation of a prior offense. The faculty member is then expected to contact the student for a personal conference to discuss the allegation.

(1) If it is a first offense, the faculty member has two options: (a) the faculty member may impose a sanction, or (b) the faculty member may refer the case directly to the Academic Review Board. The range of sanctions that may be applied by the faculty member includes the following: repetition of the examination or assignment, completion of an additional assignment or examination, failure on the examination or assignment, failure in the course. When the faculty member applies a sanction, a letter of documentation must be sent by the faculty member to an administrator designated by the Office of Academic Affairs (hereafter, the facilitator). The facilitator will send to the student, by registered mail, the original letter of documentation; the facilitator also will include information concerning the appeal process and its timelines. A copy of the original documentation letter must be delivered to the Registrar to be available in case of any subsequent offense. The letter will remain sealed in the student’s file unless called for by the ARB. For the first offense, the student has recourse of appeal to the ARB through the facilitator. The student then has twelve (12) calendar days from the date of receipt of the documentation letter to contact the facilitator and indicate a desire to initiate an appeal. If the student does not respond within twelve (12) calendar days, it is assumed the student has received the letter, waived the right to appeal, and accepted the sanction. If the student chooses to appeal, the ARB will determine the guilt or innocence of the student. For the first offense, the ARB may overturn the faculty sanction if the student is found not guilty. The faculty sanction will not be overturned, modified, or amended by the ARB if the student is found guilty. 

(2) If the incident is a second or subsequent offense, a written description of the incident must be sent directly to the ARB. The facilitator will initiate formal charges by informing, by registered mail, the accused student of the charges and that such charges will be presented to the ARB. A student charged with an offense has the right to a formal hearing before the ARB.

B. When any student suspects an incident of academic dishonesty and establishes through conversation, documentary evidence, or other means that the suspicion is reasonable, the student has a responsibility (1) to report the infraction to the faculty member teaching the course or to the appropriate academic administrator (in cases related to the library, computer center, etc.) or (2) to refer the case in writing directly to the ARB. The faculty member/administrator will deal with the infraction in the manner described in IV.1 or 4. If the case is referred directly to the ARB, the facilitator will initiate formal charges by informing, by registered mail, the accused student of the charges. Such charges will be presented to the ARB. A student charged has the right to a formal hearing before the ARB.

C. When any other University-related individual (e.g., administrator or staff) suspects an incident of academic dishonesty and establishes through conversation, documentary evidence, or other means that the suspicion is reasonable, the individual must refer the case in writing directly to the ARB. The facilitator will initiate formal charges by informing, by registered mail, the accused student of the charges and that such charges will be presented to the ARB. A student charged with an offense has the right to a formal hearing before the ARB.

D. After receiving notification of the charges from the facilitator, the student is responsible for arranging a meeting with the facilitator within twelve (12) calendar days. The student may be accompanied to the meeting by a person of his or her choice, but may not be represented by an attorney. If more than one student is charged in a particular incident, each student may meet privately with the facilitator.

The facilitator will explain the procedures to each student charged and will define the rights and responsibilities of all parties to the charges as indicated in this policy, including the right of the student to select an advisor. The Office of Academic Affairs will develop a list of volunteer advisors from administrators, faculty, and upper-division students.

The advisor assists the student in the preparation of the case; provides advice during the hearing if it takes place; or assists in preparation of an appeal, if necessary. The advisor may be selected from the list of available advisors or may be any student, faculty member, friend, or family member. The student may enlist the professional assistance of an attorney in preparation of the case or appeal; but an attorney may not act as legal counsel at the hearing. Upon request, the facilitator will assist the student in identifying an advisor.

A student charged with an offense against the Academic Honesty Policy who wishes to appeal in writing must submit his or her written appeal no later than six (6) weeks, not counting scheduled breaks in the academic calendar, following receipt of notification of the infraction. A student who wishes to appeal to the Academic Review Board (ARB) in person must make himself or herself available so that a hearing can be scheduled to occur no later than six (6) weeks, not counting scheduled breaks in the academic calendar, following receipt of the infractions. Failure to meet these deadlines will be regarded as acceptance of any sanction(s) imposed as a result of the infraction.

3. The Academic Review Board (ARB) The Academic Review Board meets throughout the year at the call of its chairperson and hears cases of academic dishonesty and student academic grievances brought to its attention. The ARB consists of two faculty from the College of Arts and Sciences, one from the School of Business, one from the School of Education, and two students (one from the School of Business or the School of Education, and one from the College of Arts and Sciences). Representatives of the offices of the Registrar and Student Services will function as consultants to the board. If any member of the ARB is party to the case before the Board, that member shall not participate in the hearing.

4. Waiver of Hearing 
The student may waive the right to a hearing and admit to the charges in writing. In cases of admitted guilt, the ARB will assign the appropriate sanction, readmission procedures if appropriate, disposition of the record, and other matters pertinent to the case. Within twelve (12) calendar days following the receipt of the waiver of hearing, the chair of the ARB will send a registered letter to the student specifying the assigned sanction. The chair will also send a confidential notice of the decision to the individual who initiated the charges. The right to a hearing is automatically waived if, without reasonable cause, the student fails to respond to the letter of notification within twelve (12) calendar days of its receipt.

5. The Hearing
The hearing is an internal University matter. Only members of the immediate University community who are invited to attend by the Chair of the ARB are permitted to attend. This community is defined as current students, faculty, administrators, or staff members. In rare cases, the Chair of the ARB may, by virtue of their relevance to the case at hand, invite other person or persons to appear. The Chair’s ruling on all matters determining who may attend the hearing will be considered definitive. The following persons must be present at the hearing: the person initiating the charges, the facilitator, and the members of the ARB as defined in 3 above. After proper notification (see 2, 3, and 4 above), if the student against whom charges are brought does not attend the hearing, the hearing will proceed without him or her. All of the persons identified are participants in the hearing and may initiate or respond to questions by other participants. If the student’s advisor is a member of the University community as defined above, the advisor may be present throughout the hearing and may, with the approval of the Chair, address the ARB on behalf of the student charged, but only on matters directly relevant to the charge. Witnesses may be present only during their own testimony and may be recalled. Any student, faculty member, or other person who is asked to testify at a hearing is expected to do so. It is expected that all statements made to the ARB, while not provided under oath, will be truthful.

It will be assumed that the student is innocent of the charges until proven guilty. Any student charged will be provided adequate opportunity to present his or her version of the case and will be allowed to call relevant witnesses. The Chair of the ARB will ensure that the hearing be conducted in a fair, objective, and dignified fashion, with special attention to the protection of rights of all participants. The Chair is responsible for maintaining order during the hearing and for ensuring that testimony is succinct, precise, and relevant to the charge. The Chair will announce a recess, if requested, for the student charged to consult with his or her advisors. In the case of a second offense, the ARB will have access to the contents of the sealed envelope from the student’s file if requested. When the ARB is satisfied that all relevant evidence has been presented and that all participants have been afforded the opportunity to state their versions of the case or to provide relevant information, the ARB will retire to executive session to consider the evidence and reach a decision. The ARB will find a student guilty of the stated offense if and only if it is satisfied by the preponderance of the evidence presented that the student’s actions meet the description of an offense against academic honesty provided above (Section III). In addition to determining whether the evidence presented justifies a finding of guilt of the charge, the ARB may choose to consider extenuating circumstances in its report. The ARB determines guilt or innocence of the specific charge by majority written vote. The Chair maintains a record of the vote. If the ARB finds the student not guilty of the charges, the student will be permitted to drop the course in which the charges arose without academic penalty. If the course is dropped, the record of the course will be removed from the student’s transcript.

If the ARB finds the student guilty of the charges, it will decide on a sanction by majority written vote. The Chair of the ARB will inform the student by registered mail of the sanction and its effective dates. The Chair of the ARB will send a confidential notice of the decision to the individual who initiated the charges.

The ARB has the option of prescribing a sanction different from the standard sanctions described below, but may do so only in cases of extraordinary extenuating circumstances. The student will be informed by the facilitator that an appeal may be directed to the appropriate academic dean. The written appeal, based solely upon issues of procedure or clear abuse of discretion, must be forwarded to the appropriate dean within twelve (12) calendar days of receipt of the letter indicating the assigned sanction. The sanction will become effective immediately unless an appeal is filed in a timely manner. If an appeal is filed in a timely manner, but is denied, the sanction will become effective as originally assigned. If the appeal is approved, the sanction may be modified or dropped by the appropriate dean.

6. The Range of Sanctions
Sanctions from the ARB for instances of academic dishonesty will include, but will not be limited to, the following: failure in the assignment, failure in that portion of the course directly related to the falsified work, failure in the course, suspension from school (usually taking effect at the beginning of the semester following the one in which the violation occurred), permanent dismissal from the University, or revocation of admission. Academic dishonesty discovered after the conferring of a degree may result in revocation of the degree upon the vote of the Board of Trustees.

In the case of suspension or dismissal, the designation “Academic Suspension” or “Academic Dismissal” will be recorded on the permanent record and transcript. If a student returns from academic suspension, transcript notation of that action will be removed after successful completion of one semester at the University of Redlands.

7. Records
The Registrar is responsible for maintaining the records of individual cases of alleged academic dishonesty and their disposition. Access to such records is subject to the University’s policies governing access to student records. The fact that a student has been accused or found guilty of an offense against academic honesty will not be indicated on the student’s transcript.

If a student is found guilty, records of the case will be retained in a sealed envelope in the student’s file for internal reference only. Under no circumstances will such information be copied, microfilmed, or sent as part of the permanent record. When a student leaves the University permanently, all records (except notation of suspension or dismissal on the permanent record and transcript) will be removed from the student’s file and retained in the files of the Academic Review Board.

University of Redlands Teach-Out Plans and Agreement Policy

I. Background

According to the WSCUC Teach Out Plans and Agreement Policy, “an institution accredited by the Commission must submit to the Commission for its prior approval a teach-out plan or agreement upon the occurrence of any of the following:

1. The Secretary of Education notifies WSCUC that the Secretary has initiated an emergency action against an institution in accordance with section 487(c)(1)(G) of the HEA or an action to limit, suspend, or terminate an institution participating in any Title IV, HEA program, in accordance with section 487(c)(1)(F) HEA, and that a teach-out plan is required.

2. WSCUC acts to withdraw, terminate, or suspend accreditation or candidacy of the institution.

3. The institution notifies WSCUC that it intends to cease operations entirely or close a location that provides one hundred percent of at least one program.

4. A state licensing or authorizing agency notifies WSCUC that an institution’s license or legal authority to provide an educational program has been or will be revoked.”

II. Definitions from WSCUC

A. Teach-Out Plan

A teach-out plan is a written plan developed by the institution if that institution, or an institutional location that provides one hundred percent of at least one program, ceases to operate before all students have completed their program of study. WSCUC may require an institution to enter into a teach-out agreement as part of its teach-out plan. A teach-out plan:

1. must provide for the equitable treatment of students by ensuring that the institution has the necessary experience, resources, and support services to provide an educational program that is of acceptable quality and reasonably similar in content, structure, and scheduling, and to meet all of obligations to its existing students;

2. must specify additional charges, if any, and provide for notification to the students of any additional charges.

B. Teach-Out Agreement
WSCUC may require an institution to enter into a teach-out agreement as part of its teach-out plan. A teach-out agreement is a written agreement between two institutions when the institution or  institutional location that provides on hundred percent of at least one program ceases to operate before all students have completed their program of study and enters into an agreement with another institution to teach out the program(s). When an institution enters into such a teach-out agreement with another institution, the initiating institution must submit the agreement to the Commission for approval prior to its implementation. The teach-out agreement may be approved only if the agreement is between institutions that are accredited by a nationally recognized accrediting agency; and

1. must be consistent with applicable standards of accreditation and Commission Policies;

2. must provide for the equitable treatment of students by ensuring that the teach-out institution has the necessary experience, resources, and support services to provide an educational program that is of acceptable quality and reasonably similar in content, structure, and scheduling to that provided by the institution that is closing or discontinuing its program(s), to remain stable, carry out its mission, and to meet all obligations to its existing students;

3. must ensure that the teach-out institution can provide students access to the program and services without requiring them to move or travel substantial distances;

4. must provide for notification of another accrediting agency if the teach-out institution holds accreditation from that agency; and

5. must specify additional charges, if any, levied by the teach-out institution and provide for notification to the students of any additional charges.

If an institution the Commission accredits or has granted candidacy to closes without a teach-out plan, the Commission must work with the Department of Education and the appropriate State agency, to the extent feasible, to assist students in finding reasonable opportunities to complete their education without additional charges.”
Revised and approved by the Commission 11/8/2013
Previously revised and approved by the Commission 11/06/2009

III. University of Redlands Policy

Federal regulations require institutions to submit a teach-out plan to the Western Senior College and University Commission (WSCUC) for approval should any of the conditions enumerated in Section I. above occur. The University of Redlands Teach-out Policy aims to satisfy the requirements established by the WSCUC and, more importantly, to protect the interests of students and faculty should cessation of operations or closure of a location that provides one hundred percent of at least one program occur. Once a decision is taken, the University of Redlands will engage the option of either developing a teach-out plan (Section II.A.) or executing a teach-out agreement (Section II.B.) and will inform affected parties about the causes and consequences of its actions. In all instances, careful consultation and coordination with affected student and faculty constituencies will occur to address their current and future interests in a sensitive and timely fashion.

After the consultations and coordination have occurred, the Provost and President will bring forward the proposal to the University of Redlands Board of Trustees for final approval. The WSCUC Accreditation Liaison Officer shall be informed in the case of an event enumerated under Section I.1.-4.

IV. Procedural Steps

A. Administration Responsibilities

The Dean responsible for a regional campus being considered for closure and/or an academic program (the Registrar keeps a list of such programs) being considered for termination shall forward a proposal to the Provost for presentation to the President’s Cabinet. The proposal must include a teach-out plan that considers the following:

• Reason for campus closure and/or program termination;
• Nature and number of program(s) affected;
• Dates of campus closure and/or program termination;
• Number of students currently enrolled;
• Statistics on students’ status and progress toward attaining each program’s degree and/or certificate;
• Statistics on resources used to maintain the campus(es) and/or offer the program(s);
• Projected financial savings, if any, to be realized by campus closure and/or program termination;
• Explanation of how students enrolled in the campus and/or program will be informed of the impending closure/termination
• Explanation of how students enrolled in the campus and/or program will be assisted in completing their program of study with minimal disruption or additional expense;
• Assessment of the degree to which faculty will be adversely affected by the planned closure/termination;
• Explanation of how faculty and staff either will be reassigned or provided assistance to find new employment;
• Signed copies of teach-out agreements with other institutions, if any are required; and
• Provisions, if any are required, for storing student records, disposition of final financial resources and other assets. 

B. Faculty Responsibilities

Concurrent with presentation of the proposal to the Provost and the President’s Cabinet, it should be brought forward for analysis by the Committees of the Faculty Senate as illustrated:

• Committee on Academic Planning and Standards (CAPS) for consideration of the proposal’s effects on academic planning and standards, the development of the teach-out plan, and the development (if any) of the teach-out agreement;
• Personnel Policies Committee (PPC) for consideration of the proposal’s effects on faculty in accordance with procedures of the Faculty Handbook (i.e. Section 3.9.6. Institutional Need);
• Budget and Planning Committee (BPC) for consideration of the proposal’s effects on budgetary, financial, and planning issues. 

The Provost and Faculty Senate President will be responsible for coordinating discussions between the Faculty Senate sub-committees and the administration on teach-out planning and assistance to affected students and faculty.

C. Affected Students

For affected students, an academic plan should be developed for each student that enables the student to complete the curricular program requirements within the teach-out period.

• The teach-out period will, typically, not be continued for more than two academic years following the date on which the notice of closure/termination is given to students. Programs will determine, on a case-by-case basis, the necessary length of a teach-out plan within this timeframe.
• Students who do not make adequate progress in their academic plan for teach-out will be advised into another degree-granting program or location, if the latter is applicable.
• If a course required for the degree is not offered in the teach-out period, students may make arrangements, with the program's consent, either to take the course at another institution and transfer the credit or to arrange with the program to complete the requirements in some other academically appropriate fashion.
• Students are required to have ongoing contact with their academic advisor during the teach-out period to ensure that their academic plans are current and consistent with the projected course offering. 

V. Scope

Implementation of this policy applies to administration, faculty, and students in all programs of the University of Redlands.