Academics

Lawrence W. Gross

Asst Professor, Race-Ethnic Studies

Degrees: Ph.D. Stanford University, M.A. Stanford University, A.M. Harvard University, B.A. University of Minnesota

Office: Race & Ethnic Studies , Larsen Hall

Phone: 909/748-8902 Campus Ext. 8902

E-mail: larry_gross@redlands.edu

Web: http://www.veteranceremonies.org

Larry Gross

Professional Experience

San Manuel Band of Mission Indians Endowed Chair of Native American Studies, Race and Ethnic Studies, University of Redlands, Redlands, CA

Assistant Professor, Department of Native American Studies, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT

A.C. Clark Library Guest Researcher, Bemidji State University, Bemidji, MN

Ford Foundation Postdoctoral Diversity Fellow, Department of Religious Studies, University of California—Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA

Assistant Professor, Joint appointment: Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies, and American Indian Studies Program, Iowa State University, Ames, IA

Academic Honors and Nominations

Nominated for the Anna K. Fridley Distinguished Teaching Award, Montana State University, November, 2010

Nominated for the President’s Excellence in Teaching Award, Montana State University, November, 2010

Nominated for the Anna K. Fridley Distinguished Teaching Award, Montana State University, March, 2010

Nominated for the President’s Excellence in Teaching Award, Montana State University, February, 2010

Nominated for the Mortar Board Professor of the Month Award, Montana State University, December, 2009

Nominated for the President’s Excellence in Teaching Award, Montana State University, February, 2009

Journal article, “Assisting American Indian Veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan Cope with Post-traumatic Stress Disorder: Lessons from Vietnam Veterans and the Writings of Jim Northrup,” presented the Wordcraft Circle of Native Writers and Storytellers Writer of the Year, Academic Article 2006-2007 award

Iowa State University American Indian Studies Academic Achievement Award for publishing five articles in peer-reviewed journals in a four year time span

Conference paper, “Making the World Sacred, Quietly, Carefully: Silence and Concentration in the Sôtô Zen and Ojibwa Indian Experience,” presented the Allyn Russell Prize for best graduate student paper at the New England—Maritime Regional American Academy of Religion meeting

Referred Articles

“Some Elements of American Indian Pedagogy from an Anishinaabe Perspective.” American Indian Culture and Research Journal 34, no. 2 (2010): 11-26.

“Healing and Humor in the Non-Fiction Works of Jim Northrup.” Wicazo Sa Review 24, no. 1 (Spring, 2009): 65-87.

“Assisting American Indian Veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan Cope with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Lessons from Vietnam Veterans and the Writings of Jim Northrup.” American Indian Quarterly 31, no. 3 (Summer, 2007): 373-409.

“Silence as the Root of American Indian Humor: Further Meditations on the Comic Vision of Anishinaabe Culture and Religion.” American Indian Culture and Research Journal 31, no. 2 (2007): 69-85.

“Teaching American Indian Studies to Reflect American Indian Ways of Knowing and to Interrupt Cycles of Genocide.” Wicazo Sa Review 20, no. 2 (Fall, 2005): 187-234.

“The Trickster and World Maintenance: An Anishinaabe Reading of Louise Erdrich’s Tracks.” Studies in American Indian Literatures 17, no. 3 (Fall, 2005): 48-66.

“Cultural Sovereignty and Native American Hermeneutics in the Interpretation of the Sacred Stories of the Anishinaabe.” Wicazo Sa Review 18, no. 2 (Fall, 2003): 127-34.

“The Comic Vision of Anishinaabe Culture and Religion.” American Indian Quarterly 26, no. 3 (Summer, 2003): 436-59.

“Bimaadiziwin, or the ‘Good Life,’ as a Unifying Concept of Anishinaabe Religion.” American Indian Culture and Research Journal 26, no. 1 (2002): 15-32.

Invited Articles

“Anishinaabe Religious Traditions.” In Encyclopedia of Religion, ed. Lindsay Jones, 368-71. 2nd edition. Vol. 1. New York: Macmillan, 2004.

“The American Indian Religious Freedom Act of 1978.” In Native Americans, ed. Donald Grinde, 117-23. American Political History Series. Washington, D.C.: CQ Press, 2002.

Current Research Projects

Mino-bimaadiziwin: To Live the Good Life of the Anishinaabeg. Book manuscript in progress.

Professional Presentations

Chair, " What Do We Do Now to Facilitate Healing between Mainstream Society and Indian Country?" panel. 12th Annual American Indian Studies Association Conference. Arizona State University, February, 2011.

“Storytelling in the Anishinaabe Context: Listening, Speaking, Learning, Living.” Earth Rights: Learning the Languages of Indigenous Environmentalism Conference. Montana State University—Bozeman, April, 2010.

 “Storytelling in the Anishinaabe Context: Listening, Speaking, Learning, Living.” Native American and Indigenous Studies Conference. University of Minnesota—Twin Cities, May, 2009.

 “Some Elements of American Indian Pedagogy from an Anishinaabe Perspective.” 10th Annual American Indian Studies Association Conference. Arizona State University, February, 2009.

“The Rhetoric of Anishinaabe Sovereignty: The Struggle for Treaty Rights as Documented in Jim Northrup’s Newspaper Column ‘The Fond du Lac Follies.’” 40th Algonquian Conference. University of Minnesota—Twin Cities, October, 2008.

“The Rhetoric of Anishinaabe Sovereignty: The Struggle for Treaty Rights as Documented in Jim Northrup’s Newspaper Column ‘The Fond du Lac Follies.’” Western States Rhetoric and Literacy Conference. Montana State University—Bozeman, October, 2008.

“Using Traditional Activities to Help Anishinaabe Veterans Cope with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Preliminary Hypothesis and Report on Future Research Plans.” Native American and Indigenous Studies conference. University of Georgia, April, 2008.

“A Modest Proposal for Developing Classes to Teach the Art of Storytelling.” Fourth Annual Storytellers of the Americas Conference: Honoring John Mohawk’s Life and Work. University of Buffalo, March, 2008.

“Using Traditional Knowledge from Native Cultures to Promote Healing: A Case Study of the Anishinaabe.” American Academy of Religion. San Diego, CA, November, 2007.

“Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and the Veteran.” Keynote address. Veteran’s Health and Wellness Day. Seven Clans Casino, Thief River Falls, MN, May, 2007.

“Assisting Veterans Cope with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Using Religious Rituals: Lessons from American Indian Societies.” First Annual A. C. Clark Library Lecture Series. Bemidji State University, Bemidji, MN, March 29, 2007.

“Storytelling and Cultural Survival in the Wake of an Apocalypse: The Case of the Anishinaabe.” Public Lecture. University of California—Davis, May, 2006.

“The History of the Oral Tradition of the Anishinaabe in the 20th Century.” American Literature Association. San Francisco, May, 2006.

“Silence as the Root of American Indian Humor.” Indigenous Professors Association. University of Kansas, March, 2006.

“Silence as the Root of American Indian Humor in Practice and Theory.” Art Gliner Center for the Study of Humor public lecture. University of Maryland, November, 2005. 

“Doing Theory Indian Style: The Development of the Idea of Postapocalypse Stress Syndrome.” Indigenous Professors Association. University of Kansas, March, 2005.

“Postapocalypse Stress Syndrome and the Anishinaabe.” All Ivy Native American Student Conference. Brown University, February, 2005.

“Postapocalypse Stress Syndrome and Rebuilding American Indian Communities.” The Role of Research in Building Communities: The African American and First Nations Experience. University of Kansas, November, 2004.

“The Liberating and Healing Power of the Trickster: A Case Study of Nanabush in the Anishinaabe Tradition.” International Society for Humor Studies. University of Maryland, July, 2001.

“The Liberating and Healing Power of the Trickster: A Case Study of Nanabush in the Anishinaabe Tradition.” Midwest Regional American Academy of Religion. Chicago, March, 2001.

Participant, “Humor and Religion” panel. Midwest Regional American Academy of Religion. Chicago, March, 2001.

“Legitimate versus Illegitimate: Towards a Hermeneutics of Transmission in Zen Buddhism.” American Academy of Religion. Boston, November, 1999.

“Minnesota in the Myths of the Midewiwin: Establishing a Sense of Place in a New Homeland.” American Studies Association. Montreal, October, 1999.

“Manzan Dôhaku on Lineage Transmission: An Analysis of the Manzan Oshô Tômon Ejo Shû.” “Dôgen and Sôtô Zen” symposium. Center for Buddhist Studies. Stanford University, October, 1999.

“Myth and Meaning in the Earth Diver Story of the Minnesota Ojibwe.” Who Will Listen and Remember: Anishinaabeg of the Great Lakes Region Symposium on History, Culture, and Contemporary Issues. University of Wisconsin—Eau Claire, September, 1999.

“Ojibwe Views of Ecology: Yesterday and Today.” Celebrate Diversity Series. Iowa State University, February, 1999.

Respondent, “American Buddhism and Ecology” panel. Consultation on Buddhism and Ecology. Center for the Study of World Religions. Harvard University, May, 1996.

“Manzan Dôhaku on Lineage Transmission: An Analysis of the Manzan Oshô Tômon Ejo Shû.” Association for Asian Studies. Honolulu, April, 1996.

“Making the World Sacred, Quietly, Carefully: Silence and Concentration in the Sôtô Zen and Ojibwa Indian Experience.” New England—Maritime Regional American Academy of Religion. Harvard University, March, 1996.

“Silence and Concentration in the Sôtô Zen and Ojibwa Indian Experience.” "Crossing Boundaries: Perspectives on Ojibwa Religion” symposium. University of Vermont, November, 1995.

“Chippewa Views of Ecology: Yesterday and Today.” Second Annual Bay Area Native American Graduate Student Conference. Stanford University, April, 1995.

“Manzan Dôhaku and Lineage Transmission.” Public lecture. Smith College, April, 1995.

“Silence and Concentration in the Sôtô Zen and Ojibwa Indian Experience.” First Annual Bay Area Native American Graduate Student Conference. Stanford University, April, 1994.

“From Hagiography to History in the Case of Manzan Dôhaku.” Western Regional American Academy of Religion. Santa Clara University, March, 1994.

Media Appearances

"Professor Launches Website for Veterans." This Week from Indian Country Today. Vol 1, issue 18 (May 25, 2011), 19.

MSU News Service. "MSU Professor Launches Web Site to Aid Veterans with PTSD." Bozeman Chronicle, April 17, 2010, C5

Interview on KBZK television, Bozeman, Montana, Monday, April 14, 2011. Interview topic: Veterans, posttraumatic stress disorder, and religious rituals.

MSU News Service. "MSU Professor Launches Web Site to Aid Veterans with PTSD." Montana State University. April 11, 2011.

ICTMN Staff. "Montana State University Professor Launches Website to Help Veterans With PTSD." Indian Country Today Media Network. April 11, 2011.

Interview on KTVM television, Bozeman, Montana, Monday, April 11, 2011. Interview topic: Veterans, posttraumatic stress disorder, and religious rituals.

Lauren Russell. “American Indians Have a Unique Take on Environmental Issues, Presenters Say.” Bozeman Chronicle, April 3, 2010, A1.

Interviewed for newspaper article, Krista J. Kapralos, “Warriors and Patriots: Many American Indians Served before Getting Full Citizenship Rights,” The Herald, Everett, WA, July 3, 2009, A1.

Interview on KRFP radio, Moscow, Idaho, Sunday, April 1, 2007. Interview topic: Veterans, posttraumatic stress disorder, and religious rituals.

Interview on KAXE radio, Grand Rapids, Minnesota, March 21, 2007. Interview topic: Veterans, posttraumatic stress disorder, and religious rituals.

Outside Doctor of Philosophy Reading Committee

Emerson Bull Chief. Dissertation topic: Crow Indian Science. Doctor of Philosophy candidate. American Studies. Montana State University—Bozeman.

Doctor of Philosophy Reading Committees

Burgess, Benjamin. “Clan-Destined Communities: Clan Identity in Ojibwe Literature.” Doctor of Philosophy. Native American Studies. University of California—Davis.

Sample, Joseph. “Rhetoric in Cross-Cultural Appropriation: A Case Study of Chinese and European ‘Enlightenment’ Periods.” Doctor of Philosophy. Rhetoric and Professional Communication. Department of English. Iowa State University.

Noori, Margaret. “Native American Literature in Tribal Context: Anishinaabe Aadisokaanag Noongom.” Doctor of Philosophy. Department of English. University of Minnesota—Twin Cities.

University Service

University of Redlands

  • Chairs and Directors Assembly Meetings
  • College of Arts and Sciences Assembly Meetings
  • University Assembly Meetings
  • Liaison work with Sherman Indian Boarding School, Riverside, CA
  • Liaison work with Noli Indian School, San Jacinto, CA
  • Other service work as required by the Endowed Chair position

Montana State University—Bozeman

  • Library liaison, Department of Native American Studies

Bemidji State University

  • Volunteer grant writing work for the American Indian Resource Center

Iowa State University

  • Panel Organizer, “American Indians in the Academy: Challenges and Responses,” Iowa State University Conference on Race and Ethnicity
  • Religious Studies Club faculty advisor
  • American Indian Studies Program liaison work with the Mesquakie Indians
  • American Indian Studies Program Advisory Committee

University of Vermont

  • Co-organizer, “Crossing Boundaries: Perspectives on Ojibwa Religion” symposium

Professional Service

  • Member, Steering Committee, Native Traditions of the Americas Group, American Academy of Religion
  • Contributing Editor, Wicazo Sa Review
  • Member, Steering Committee, Native Traditions of the Americas Group, American Academy of Religion

Community Service

Naytahwaush Community Charter School, Naytahwaush, MN
Volunteer tutoring for combined 5th and 6th grade class. Naytahwaush Community Charter School is located on the White Earth reservation.

White Earth Tribal and Community College
Tribal Colleges and Universities Program grant writing work
Student tutoring in english and mathematics

Professional Affiliations

  • American Academy of Religion
  • Native American and Indigenous Studies Association 

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Redlands has 12 recent Fulbright Scholar recipients.

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