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Redlands Named "Green College" by the Princeton Review

The University of Redlands has been named one of the country’s most environmentally responsible colleges, according to The Princeton Review, a nationally known education services company, and the U.S. Green Building Council.

The university was chosen this week among 25 other colleges in California for inclusion in a unique resource for college applicants: The Princeton Review’s Guide to 286 Green Campuses.” The free Guide can be downloaded at www.princetonreview.com/greenguide and www.usgbc.org/campus.

This is the second national environmental recognition the University of Redlands has received this year. In addition to the “Green College” label by the Princeton Review, the University of Redlands on Friday hosted a public tour of its grounds after being named a 2009 Tree Campus USA by the Arbor Day Foundation for its dedication to campus forestry management and environmental stewardship.

Other environmental programs and accomplishments for the University of Redlands include:

  • The new Center for the Arts, a complex built to meet the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Green Building Standards.
  • The Lewis Hall for Environmental Studies, a silver LEED-certified, state-of-the-art “green building” that opened in 2005
  • A “Low Carbon Diet Day” to be hosted on Earth Day Thursday by Bon Appétit, the university’s food service provider, which focuses on buying products locally.
  • The opening of an official green dorm last year at Merriam Hall.
  • A cogeneration and chiller plant that generates heating and cooling for many buildings and for the pool in the aquatic center.
  • The University of Redlands is also a charter signatory of the American College and University Presidents Climate Commitment, which calls for an emissions inventory and a timeline for making the campus “climate neutral.”
The Princeton Review Guide profiles the nation’s most environmentally responsible campuses, from solar panel study rooms to the percentage of budget spent on local/organic food. “Our research has shown that students and their parents are becoming more and more interested in learning about attending universities and colleges that practice, teach and support environmental responsibility,” said Robert Franek, the guide’s senior vice-president and publisher.

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