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H1N1 Information and Prevention

Get Vaccinated

Flu season is not over and typically lasts until May. The 2009 novel H1N1 influenza virus ("H1N1") is still circulating in the community and the threat of another wave of influenza is still possible. The single best way to avoid the H1N1 virus is to get vaccinated. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) encourages everyone to get vaccinated against H1N1.

Who Can Get Vaccinated on Campus

The University has opened on-campus vaccination to the following:

• University of Redlands students;
• University of Redlands employees;
• University of Redlands employees' spouses;
• University of Redlands employees' dependent children (ages 4-24 years);
• University of Redlands retirees

Where to Go to Get Vaccinated

Vaccinations will be available in the Student Health Center , by appointment, on an on-going basis, while vaccine supplies last. To inquire about an appointment to be vaccinated at the Student Health Center, please call (909) 748-8021. Students must show their student ID and employees their employee ID. Employees must accompany their spouses and dependent children.

Note: Students under the age of 18 will need to arrange for parental consent. If this vaccination is the 2nd for those children between the ages of 4 to 9 years, please bring the paperwork from their 1st H1N1 vaccination. Student Health Center personnel must verify that four weeks has passed since the 1st vaccination. 

For the most up-to-date information about public health clinics in San Bernardino County offering H1N1 vaccinations, visit the San Bernardino County Department of Public Health website at http://www.sbcounty.gov/dph/, or call 1-800-782-4264.

H1N1 Injectable, Inactivated, Vaccine: What You Need to Know

You should not get the 2009 H1N1 flu vaccine if you have a severe (life-threatening) allergy to eggs, or to any other substance in the vaccine. Tell the person giving you the vaccine if you have any severe allergies. Also tell them if you have ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction after a dose of seasonal flu vaccine or Guillain Barré Syndrome (a severe paralytic illness also called GBS). These may not be reasons to avoid the vaccine, but the medical staff can help you decide. If you are moderately or severely ill, you might be advised to wait until you recover before getting the vaccine. If you have a mild cold or other illness, there is usually no need to wait.

The CDC has published Vaccine Information Statements ("VIS") that explain the benefits and risks of the H1N1 vaccine.

Click here to view the VIS for the inactivated H1N1 vaccine.

Click here to view the VIS for the live, intranasal H1N1 vaccine.

Regular updates will be posted as information becomes available. You can also visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Web site for answers to many frequently answered questions at:

http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/general_info.htm

General Information

General Information

In an effort to prevent the spread of the 2009 novel H1N1 influenza virus ("H1N1"), the University has kept the campus informed about the CDC's guidelines and steps students and employees can take to keep healthy. For more information visit http://www.flu.gov.

The University will keep the campus updated with new information as it becomes available. We strongly encourage all members of the University of Redlands community to take the standard precautions recommended during the flu season and to play an active role in public health efforts. These standard precautions have been highlighted in letters to parents, students, staff and administrators sent this past September:

Letter to College of Arts and Sciences Parents and Students (9-07-09)
Letter to School of Business Students (9-07-09)
Letter to School of Education Students (9-07-09)
Letter to Staff and Administrators (9-04-09)
Letter to College of Arts and Sciences Parents (10-05-09)
Letter to College of Arts and Sciences Parents (10-26-09)
Letter to College of Arts and Sciences Parents (11-16-09)

 

The University Health Center has also published information about what students should do if they suspect they may have the flu. This information can be found at:

Flu Facts


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