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Dysphagia in Adults and Children

dysphagia

Michael Groher, a communicative disorders professor and the chair of the department of communicative disorders, has recently released his book, “Clinical Management of Dysphagia in Adults and Children (Elsevier).”

“This is the first text that has focused on the management of swallowing disorders in a comprehensive manner in children and adults. It summarizes all of the current diagnostic and treatment approaches used with patients who present with oropharyngeal and esophageal swallowing disorders,” said Groher.

According to the professor, 70-80 percent of a speech pathologist’s caseload in a medical setting is made up of patients who have a swallowing dysfunction.

As more and more patients need treatment for swallowing disorders, Groher and his colleague, Michael Crary have recognized the need to present the most recent research in treatments in a textbook for graduate and postgraduate students.

“The new text is the most comprehensive in the field and gives readers access to a Web site where they can find examples of swallowing disorders,” said Groher.

“Because there has not been a comprehensive text in this specialty in more than 10 years, we think this work will be used extensively in graduate programs and as a reference for practicing speech pathologists.”

Over the last 30 years, the professor of communicative disorders has contributed to or written more than 60 publications and books in the last 30 years.

Groher’s interest in helping others to acquire and reacquire language was found here at the University of Redlands, where he completed his undergraduate and graduate studies.

“Coming back to teach at an institution that gave me the beginnings of my career has only reminded me how strong my education was, and how much I enjoy the campus and the surrounding community,” he said.

“It inspires me personally to do my best as a professor, to help the program grow, and to maintain Redlands’ strong reputation.”

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