News

ISEA Employment Report

pic

California Starts the New Year with a Rapid Job Growth

The Inland Empire Leads the Pack in Job Growth for January 2014

For January 2014, a University of Redlands Institute for Spatial Economic Analysis (ISEA) study finds the overall year-over-year job growth in California has improved to a great extent compared to December 2013. The Inland Empire has shown exceptional rapid job growth in January 2014, as almost the whole region appears dark green (more than 3% job growth). In addition, Silicon Valley, San Francisco, and Fresno are also leading the pack. Oakland and Fremont have stepped out of the idling status from December 2013. The Sacramento area, Orange County and San Diego County still have a steady pace of growth. The job growth in Los Angeles County has also improved with near the whole county showing moderate to significant job increase. Madera and Sonora are the only two major areas showing negative job growth in January 2014.

On the other hand, the overall month-over-month job growth in California is not as optimistic as the overall year-over-year job growth in January 2014. The overall month-over-month job growth in Southern California worsens with almost the whole region stepping into the orange (moderate job loss) zone with a few scattered spots in Inland Empire, Los Angeles County, and San Diego County even showing more than 3% significant job loss. The overall month-over-month job growth in Northern California appears to have the same pattern with the whole region showing moderate to significant job loss. Only very few scattered locations around Visalia appear to have positive job growth in January 2014.

Year-over-Year Metro Market Findings in Southern California

INLAND EMPIRE

  • The year-over-year job growth in Riverside and San Bernardino counties has improved dramatically this month with the average job growth rate increasing from 1.14% in December 2013 to 3.08% in January 2014.
  • Almost the whole region appears dark green (more than 3% significant job growth) with no locations shedding jobs or appearing idling.

LOS ANGELES COUNTY

  • The year-over-year job growth in Los Angeles County has increased this month as well with the average job growth rate increasing from 1.16% in December 2013 to 2.24% in January 2014.
  • The whole county still appears patchy within the positive job growth zone where locations with moderate job growth (1% to 3%) are right next to areas with significant job growth (more than 3%). The only idling locations appear at San Fernando, Calabasas, the small pocket between Seal Beach and Cypress, and the area south of Los Angeles. There are no areas showing negative job growth in January 2014.

ORANGE COUNTY

  • The year-over-year job growth in Orange County has slightly increased this month with the average job growth rate increasing from 2.44% in December 2013 to 2.70% in January 2014.
  • Almost the whole county still appears light green (1% to 3% moderate job growth) to dark green (more than 3% significant job growth) except for the small location in the eastern region of the county still showing moderate job loss (-3% to -1%). In addition, the area near the north border has started shedding jobs and the area east to Sunset Beach has stepped into the idling status (-1% to 1% job growth) in January 2014.

SAN DIEGO COUNTY

  • The year-over-year job growth in San Diego County has improved this month with the average job growth rate increasing from 1.81% in December 2013 to 2.22% in January 2014.
  • Most regions in the county still show moderate (1% to 3%) job growth with the dark green zone (more than 3% significant job growth) expanding to more areas including Escondido, Ramona, Rancho Santa Fe, Solana Beach, Del mar, Casa de Oro, Jamul, the area between Lemon Grove and Bonita, and the area north to San Diego downtown. Only two small locations near Coronado and Bonita are still appearing idling status (-1% to 1% job growth). No locations shed jobs in January 2014.

METHODOLOGY

The researchers combined today’s data release on employment by industry from the California Employment Development Department with business pattern data by zip code and industry from the U.S. Census Bureau to arrive at their projected values. The researchers point out that, given the data available to them, their projected values are only rough approximations of the true values, and that accuracy is higher for counties with larger populations. Despite those shortcomings, the observed patterns should still be helpful for decision makers in politics, businesses and organizations to determine where to best direct their efforts.

Author: Bing Bai
Faculty Fellow at the Institute for Spatial Economic Analysis
University of Redlands, School of Business
Bing_Bai@redlands.edu

Media Contact
Johannes Moenius,
Director, Institute for Spatial Economic Analysis
University of Redlands, School of Business
909-557-8161
isea@redlands.edu


Design through Math
Appleton Hall

The back of the University of Redlands own Appleton Hall contains a mathematically designed ‘Echo Chamber’ that uses calculated angles to refract sound.

Read More »