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Life After Johnston

Lucy Greene

Johnston alumna Lucy Greene '72

Johnston alumna Lucy Greene ’72 told a crowd in the Bekins lobby Feb. 22 about her work as president of The Seeds Project, a nonprofit initiative for humanitarian, ecological and spiritual work worldwide.

"The Seeds Project serves as an umbrella for groups and individuals who want to do good in the world," Greene said. "Some of the work they have done is phenomenal, when you consider how much good one can do with just a small amount of money."

Greene described an ongoing project in Uganda that brought preschool education to a rural subsistence farming area. The project started with only $4,000, and within a year boasted a budget of $14,000, more than 100 students, and three classrooms.

"Within four years, this project will have served at least 1,000 students," Greene said. "It's amazing how little seeds can start movements."

"Lucy's story is engaging and encouraging to Johnston students who are about to face the real world after graduating," said Caroline DeBruhl '12. "It's great to see a person who has made real impact on the world with a Johnston education."

Greene extended an open hand to Johnston students interested in community outreach and distributed Seed Project applications.

"If you want to go out and serve sandwiches to the homeless and all you want to do is buy peanut butter and jelly and bread … you could start a Seed Project with us to do that,” she said. “You could then go to vendors and ask, ‘For a tax-deductible receipt, would you be willing to donate $50 or $100?’ And you could collect the money and get your project started that way.”

"Life really is open to you students," she said. "Even in this economy. You're able to do a lot of things with your life."

Seeds Project application process


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