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Screening with filmmaker Holly Mosher

November 22, 2011—The University of Redlands is pleased to announce that filmmaker Holly Mosher will present her film, “Bonsai People—The Vision of Muhammad Yunus” at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 29 in the Orton Center. The screening is free and open to the public.

Dr. Yunus is one of seven people in history to get a Nobel Peace Prize, the Presidential Medal of Freedom and the Congressional Gold Medal. The title of the film comes from Dr. Yunus’s comment in his acceptance speech for the 2006 Nobel Peace Prize—“Poor people are bonsai people, there is nothing wrong with their seed—society never allowed them the space to grow.”

What if you could harness the power of the free market to solve the problems of poverty, hunger, and inequality? To some, it sounds impossible, but Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus is doing just that. “Bonsai People” is an emotionally compelling look at several women receiving microcredit loans and how it empowers them. Through their stories, we see what Yunus saw—microcredit is an important tool, but financial woes are not their only problem—they have needs which simple business solutions can help fulfill.

“Bonsai People” is the first film to follow his work with microcredit and social business. Microcredit is just the tip of the iceberg!

Holly Mosher is an award-winning filmmaker who brings socially conscious films to the public. After graduating with honors from New York University's Tisch School of the Arts, Holly produced a number of commercials and feature films. In 2004 she made her directorial debut with the documentary, “Hummingbird.” Afterwards, she produced the critically acclaimed films “Side Effects,” starring Katherine Heigl, and the follow-up documentary “Money Talks: Profits Before Patient Safety.”

Holly Mosher is an award-winning filmmaker who brings socially-conscious films to the public. After graduating with honors from New York University's Tisch School of the Arts, Holly produced a number of commercials and feature films. In 2004 she made her directorial debut with the documentary, “Hummingbird.” Afterwards, she produced the critically acclaimed films “Side Effects,” starring Katherine Heigl, and the follow-up documentary “Money Talks: Profits Before Patient Safety.”

"Banker to the Poor"

Professor Muhammad Yunus established the Grameen Bank in Bangladesh in 1983, fueled by the belief that credit is a fundamental human right. His objective was to help poor people escape from poverty by providing loans on terms suitable to them and by teaching them a few sound financial principles so they could help themselves.

From Dr. Yunus' personal loan of small amounts of money to destitute basketweavers in Bangladesh in the mid-70s, the Grameen Bank has advanced to the forefront of a burgeoning world movement toward eradicating poverty through microlending. Replicas of the Grameen Bank model operate in more than 100 countries worldwide.

By establishing Grameen Bank in 1983, Muhammad Yunus sought to realize his vision of self-support for the very poorest people by means of loans on easy terms. The bank has since been a source of inspiration for similar microcredit institutions in over one hundred countries.

Banks in the traditional system have been reluctant to lend money to anyone unable to give some form or other of security. Grameen Bank, on the other hand, works on the assumption that even the poorest of the poor can manage their own financial affairs and development given suitable conditions. The instrument is microcredit: small long-term loans on easy terms.

Banks in the traditional system have been reluctant to lend money to anyone unable to give some form or other of security. Grameen Bank, on the other hand, works on the assumption that even the poorest of the poor can manage their own financial affairs and development given suitable conditions. The instrument is microcredit: small long-term loans on easy terms.

For more information regarding this event, please contact Leela MadhavaRau at leela_madhavarau@redlands.edu or 909-748-8285.


Thurber, an English bulldog, is the University's mascot.
Thurber

He is named after Clarence Howe Thurber, University president from 1933-37.

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