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RecycleMania Results 2014

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In its second year of competition, the University of Redlands improved in all categories during the 2014 RecycleMania Tournament.

The overall weekly recycling rate went up from 15.05 percent in 2013 to 27.44 percent this year. Some of the most significant gains were seen in the increase in composting of food service organics due to work being done at the Sustainable University of Redlands Farm (SURF). Cardboard recycling also increased significantly as the University continued to work with on-campus generators to improve processes for capture and recycle. University of Redlands ranked 36th overall in the cardboard competition and 39th overall in the recycling of paper.

“I think students were more excited about participating,” Jenny Sorenson, associate director of facilities operations, said. “Since they were aware of it from last year, and different clubs and organizations and departments participated, I think that made a difference. It’s great.”

Redlands competed against 460 other colleges and universities across the United States and Canada. The schools were ranked according to how much recycling, trash, and food waste they collected between February and March 29. Overall, the participating schools collectively recycled or composted 89.1 million pounds of recyclables and organic materials, preventing the release of 126,597 metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent (MTCO2E) into the atmosphere. That is the equivalent of preventing annual emissions from 24,823 cars.

At Redlands, students were educated on how to sort waste and what can be recycled. Residence halls competed to improve their recycling efforts, and an art competition was held for local children, using recycled materials.

“We tried to do more public educational events, so people could know what they should be recycling and what’s available,” Sorenson said. “I think it was very well received, especially from the students.”

Posted: April 21, 2014


Cogeneration Plant
Cogeneration Plant

The state-of-the-art power facility enables the University to produce a majority of its own energy and has reduced the campus’s carbon footprint by 33 percent.

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