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Cummings Peace Lecture

Paul Loeb

This year’s Cummings Lecture on World Peace will feature author Paul Loeb discussing citizen responsibility and empowerment.

The event will start at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 13 in the Casa Loma Room.

“Paul Loeb is well known in this community as a strong voice for citizen engagement and involvement,” Chaplain John Walsh said. “His books, ‘Soul of a Citizen’ and ‘The Impossible Will Take a Little While,’ have both been used in different courses at the University.”

The Cummings Lecture on World Peace was inaugurated in 1990, and is made possible by the estate of Oliver deWolf ’21 and Edith M. Cummings. Previous speakers for the series include Diane Nash, Dr. Charles Kimball, Richard Falk, Olin Clyde Robinson and Penda Hair.

“The Cummings Peace Lecture has long been a forum from which issues of peace and justice can be discussed,” Walsh said. “This lecture series has been an important lecture encouraging our community to be a voice that speaks out for justice.”

Loeb has spent more than 30 years researching citizen responsibility and what makes some people choose lives of social commitment while others abstain. In 2008, he founded and coordinated the Campus Election Engagement Project, a non-partisan effort which helped 500 colleges and universities enroll 3 million students to vote.

“Finding ways to make a difference, whatever your political views may be, is an important step for all of us to take,” Walsh said. “If you want to be involved and want to help bring about a more peaceful and just world, the Cummings Peace Lecture is something you won’t want to miss.”

This lecture is free and open to the public.

“Everyone is welcome to attend,” Walsh said. “Anyone who cares about issues of peace and justice and wishes to speak truth to power will find this lecture to be a great experience.”


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