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Community Service Honors

Redlands admitted to the 2013 President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll with distinction

Redlands is among only five institutions in the nation named to the honor roll “with distinction” each year since the award’s inception

REDLANDS, March 11, 2013—The Corporation for National and Community Service has again honored the University of Redlands as a leader among institutions of higher education for its support of volunteering, service-learning and civic engagement.

The President's Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll, launched in 2006, annually highlights the role colleges and universities play in solving community problems and placing more students on a lifelong path of civic engagement by recognizing institutions that achieve meaningful, measureable outcomes in the communities they serve.

Of the 642 schools and universities recognized on this year’s Presidents Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll for exemplary, innovative and effective community service programs, Redlands is among the 109 institutions named to the Honor Roll with distinction.

The University represents one of only five schools in the country that have received the designation each year since the award’s inception in 2006. Additionally, in 2007, Redlands was one of three schools in the nation chosen for the Corporation’s highest award, the Presidential award, for service to disadvantaged youth.

“What is extraordinary about this year is that we were once again named ‘with distinction.’ For us, it marks the sixth consecutive year,” said Tony Mueller, director of the University’s Community Service Learning office.

Mueller said that the recognition is largely due to Redlands’ commitment to non-profit work study opportunities, a community service graduation requirement, faculty members who build service into their curriculum and a student body that serves upwards of 100,000 hours each year.

“Being named to the Honor Roll ‘with distinction’ each year is a testament to the University of Redlands’ commitment to embedding service into the undergraduate experience,” he said.

The impact of service creates a big impact in the neighboring community of University of Redlands. The courses under Community Service Activity served an estimated 12,300 individuals, built two houses, served 550 meals, 85 hours of job training and support, tutored/mentored 1,800 students, assisted 200 students in undertaking service learning, read 225 books, coached 200 children and maintained 12 community gardens. 

When compared to last year, the most notable improvement of hours logged came from the categories of estimated number of individuals served, which grew from 12,300 to 16,200 and students tutored/mentored which grew from 1,800 to 2,400.

The Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS) oversees the Honor Roll in collaboration with the U.S. Departments of Education and Housing and Urban Development, Campus Compact, and the American Council on Education. Honorees are chosen based on a series of selection factors, including the scope and innovation of service projects, the extent to which service-learning is embedded in the curriculum, the school's commitment to long-term campus-community partnerships, and measurable community outcomes as a result of the service.

The Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS) is a federal agency that engages more than 5 million Americans in service through its Senior Corps, AmeriCorps, and Learn and Serve America programs, and leads President Barack Obama’s national call to service initiative, United We Serve.

For more information regarding the award and the University’s community service program, visit the Community Service Learning office website at www.redlands.edu/academics/community-service-learning.aspx. For more information on CNCS, visit NationalService.gov.

Media Contact:
Patty Zurita
909-748-8070
patty_zurita@redlands.edu


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