Academics

Call For Case Studies

Case studies that illustrate applications of Geotechnology such as GIS in the business sector can be effective for teaching purposes. In fact, business school faculty members often feel that there is a dearth of business GIS case studies of varying scope and varying depth in various business disciplines.

One of GISAB’s objectives is to support the development of business GIS case studies. Faculty members are invited to develop such cases in the CALL FOR CASE STUDIES. Cases may be application oriented or somewhat theoretical, from any sector – for-profit or not-for-profit, focus on any business discipline (such as Marketing, Information Systems, Operations Management, International  Business, Business Ethics, just to name a few), or focus on any theme (such as Big Data, Analytics, Sustainability, just to name a few). Cases of varying scope (with or without a hands-on lab component) and depth (graduate versus undergraduate) may be developed.

Irrespective of the nature of the case, application domain, and focus, a case must exemplify its connections to business and also the value (tangible and/or intangible) added by GIS, spatial thinking, and spatial analysis.

You may direct any questions to Dr. Avijit Sarkar, Assc. Professor of Operations Research, and Director of GISAB. E-mail: avijit_sarkar@redlands.edu.

Call for case Studies can be found here

 

Sample cases

Case 1: Transportation of Suppliers and of Customers to Starbucks in the City San Francisco

Dr. James Pick
Keywords: location analytics, transportation, proximity, drive time analysis, tapestry segmentation

Case 2: Site Selection For University of Redlands Regional Campus Location 

Neelam Raigangar
Keywords: location analytics, spatial thinking,  drive time analysis, geodemographic segmentation

Case 3: Locate San Francisco Student Apartments Near Starbucks

Dr. Keri Then
Keywords: location analytics, transportation,  drive time analysis, tapestry segmentation


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