Academics

Spring 2016 Courses

Spring 2016 Courses

Johnston Handbook of Courses Spring 2016

JNST OOOA
DIY Media Production

T/TH  1-2:20 p.m.
Adam Ghovayzi

This course aims to give students a better understanding of visual-media production, with a focus on do-it-yourself techniques.  The aim of the course is to acquire  specific techniques used by many filmmakers, including editing, color correction, lighting, and other aspects of film form.  Using these tools students will create pieces that respond to texts and films we will watch as inspiration, to dissect, or to study.  Because students will be expected to make their work public in some meaningful way, we'll also learn the legal and social contexts of media distribution, including copyright.  Students will  be evaluated, in part, on a piece that must be submitted to the University's "Redlands Film Festival".  The final project will include an exhibition showing student work to the Johnston and greater University communities.  This exhibition will be evaluated on a group level and will require all members of the course to work collaboratively in order to be executed effectively.  Thus, students will learn both individual and collaborative skills necessary to produce high quality, effective media.
*A $50 dollar lab fee will be required to take this course.
** A cap of 12 students will be put on this course to ensure everyone will have time to review all of the produced work.
Interested participants should email Adam_Ghovayzi@redlands.edu

JNST OOOB
GYST
Fri.  1-3:50 p.m.
MG Maloney

The Class offers students a space to work on their information literacy skills and organizational habits, as well as learn about different styles of learning and how to strengthen their critical thinking skills. GYST: The Class is organized as ½ in-class workshop and ½ study hall. The in-class workshops range in subjects depending on what co-learners decide on the first day of class.

JNST OOO O
Integrated Semester
Professor Tim Seiber

Seniors Only: This course is for students who want to complete a major project over the course of a single term, and who need space in their calendar to make this project complete.  It can be taken for 8-16 units, with most students taking it for 8 or 12.  As a reminder, each 4 units = approximately 12 hours per week for the entire semester.  The project must be interdisciplinary in nature, combining a variety of learning modes.  This can and should include: research, creative practice, experiential learning, analysis, and community organizing.  Students will meet each week to discuss a variety of topics related to project completion, and will meet periodically with the instructor throughout the semester to check in on the process. In addition to these meetings, students whose work primarily falls outside of Professor Seiber’s areas of expertise will be expected to have a faculty mentor, with whom they will meet to discuss their progress.  You must be able and willing to work independently to take this seminar.  If you have questions about this class, please contact Tim in his office or via email at tim_seiber@redlands.edu.  This class is by permission only.  Permission will be granted to students who have completed the following application, and for whom this class seems an appropriate venue for their project. 

Application:

  1. Please discuss with a faculty member your interest in this seminar.  Ask them if they could be your sponsor.  If they say yes, please ask them to send Professor Seiber a short email saying that they will sponsor your integrated semester project.
  2. Write a 1-2 page application essay that addresses the following questions:
     a) What is the current plan for your project? 
     b) How is your idea interdisciplinary?
     c) Why does this project need the full 8-12 units, rather than you taking traditional seminars and contracting them? How many units do you plan for this project?
     d) What methods or materials will you use to complete this project, and will you need to apply to the Student Project Fund or other sources of revenue for supplies?
     e) How does this integrated semester fit in to your graduation contract?
     f) What is your plan for working with your faculty sponsor?  How will their support improve your work?
  3. Print an updated version of your course list.
  4. Email Tim your updated course list and your 1-2 page application essay by NOVEMBER 15. Applicants will be notified if they have been admitted to the seminar the following day, and add slips will be signed for admitted students.

JNST OOOD
Oaxaca Integrated Semester
Prof. Pat Wasielewski

This semester long program in Oaxaca, Mexico is being offered by the University of Redands, in conjunction with the Johnston Center for Integrative Studies. Johnston has long been an innovator in supporting programs that allow students to integrate classroom and experiential education. During the spring of 2016, Johnston and College of Arts and Sciences students will have the ability to spend the entire semester studying in Oaxaca and traveling to Guatemala and, for the first time, Cuba. This is the sixth time this successful semester long trip has been offered.
 
LOCATION:
           The program will be based in Oaxaca City, Oaxaca, Mexico. Oaxaca is not yet overrun with tourism like some popular spots for study abroad in Mexico, but is also not isolated from the sort of necessities that would make the smooth running of a program like this possible. The city of Oaxaca is the capital of the department of Oaxaca, and thus is home to many local governmental and administrative agencies. Oaxaca is an educational center for the region and there are multiple institutions of higher education. It is a short drive from a myriad of archaeological sites, including Monte Alban and Mitla. The area has been the center of the Zapotec and Mixtec cultures, both native cultures with continue to be important today. The department of Oaxaca is home to 26 distinct indigenous groups in total. One of the earliest colonial towns in Mexico, Oaxaca has a rich architectural history that has contributed to its fame as a center of arts and crafts of Mexico. Oaxaca is a great place to see daily modern Mexican life in a thriving metropolis directly tied to global markets.
 
Part of the semester includes a two week travel component to Guatemala and Cuba. We will fly directly to Guatemala City from Oaxaca. We will be staying in Antigua which we will use as our base. We will be doing some traveling through the highland area including going to Chichicastenango, Santiago Atitlan. At either the end or the beginning of the trip we will be spending a few days in Guatemala City, and at the Mayan ruins of Tikal. From Guatemala City we will return to Mexico City and depart with the Holbrook Travel organization We will return to Oaxaca for a final week and a half period to finish up our work.
 
PROGRAM OUTLINE
   The idea of an integrated semester is for students to be able to bring together various pieces of their education together to enhance each with the other. This semester will provide each student with an outline of materials that they will be studying. However, each student will combine this information in a way that will be relevant to his or her emphasis or major. Sixteen units of credit will be possible. Each student will participate in the following:
 
Intensive Language Study -
   Students will attend intensive language classes (3 hours/day) during almost their entire semester in Oaxaca and Guatemala. Depending on the students’ level of proficiency, they will be placed in either a beginning, intermediate or advanced Spanish class. For totally bilingual students the opportunity to study literature or an indigenous language will be available. These classes will be provided by the Becari Language School in Oaxaca (http://www.mexonline.com/becari.htm).
 
History and Culture of Mexico and Central America
In order to provide a comprehensive introduction to the history and culture of both countries, we will be drawing on local resources to provide both academic and hands on experience with their history and culture. We will be working with SURCO (Servicios Universitarios y Redes de Conocimientos en Oaxaca) and various organizations in Guatamala and Cuba to provide the best information from local experts and opportunities to enhance learning by meeting with community groups, officials, taking archeological field trips and otherwise participating in various aspects of everyday life.
SURCO: http://www.surcooaxaca.org/index.html
Global Exchange: http://www.globalexchange.org
 
Oaxaca Community Involvement Project -
   Each student, working individually or in small groups, will have the opportunity to participate in some community service organization or participate in some element of interaction with the community on something that pertains to their emphasis or major. The organizations are many and varied and students will find a placement depending on their language ability.
 
Globalization, Development and Tourism -
   The faculty in residence, Pat Wasielewski, will teach this class. General theories of globalization and tourism will be covered and we analyze how those theories play themselves out in Oaxaca and the surrounding areas. Comparisons will then be made in Guatemala and Cuba. These areas have inspired a lot of study and so there is extensive background that assures we can both experience and academically analyze them from multiple perspectives.
 
Final Project/Analysis –
In conjunction with Pat, each student will design and complete a final project that brings together what they have learned. It is also possible that students will choose to make part of the final project a collective group product or activity. A three unit May term class will be offered for those in the group who would like to return to the U.S. and in some way share what they have learned with the Johnston and broader University community.
 
Faculty In Residence
Patricia Wasielewski is a full professor of Sociology and Women’s studies. She has taught at the University of Redlands for over 30 years. She has successfully lead many trips with
U o R students since 1994. Pats own research is on the effects of globalization on identity construction and gendering of development processes. She travels frequently to Mexico and Guatemala, and teaches courses in social psychology, deviance, criminology, popular culture, and emotions.

JNST OOOE
NANCY CARRICK:  2016 Johnston Courses in Greek Theatre and Art

JNST 000E JOHNSTON SEMINAR,  
Greek Stories in Plays and Vase Painting
 
HL 213
T/TH 1-2:20 p.m.
Cross-listed with Art History, English, and Visual and Media Studies
Fulfills pre-1800 requirement
Nancy Carrick

This seminar will explore the stories the Greeks told as they are revealed in the great tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides and in ancient Greek vase painting.  We will examine how the playwrights and painters alike chose their stories from the traditions they inherited and how they presented the details of those stories.  We will explore Greek theatrical performance and stagecraft, the craft of actors and chorus, the conventions of narrative art, and topics of your choosing.  You will have opportunities to investigate this material in discussion, informal journal reflection, researching an aspect of the making of the stories, and writing – opportunities that will offer you a variety of ways to encounter the Greeks’ world through its art and theatre.

JNST OOOF
Outdoor Literature and Film
Instructor: Hongwei Lu
Days and Time: T/Th 11:30 a.m. to 12:50 p.m.

This course will be an intellectual odyssey of outdoor literature and film. Themes of the course will be environmental ethics, conservation, nature and self, nature and gender, nature and civilizations, contemporary ills of the modern society, etc. We’ll explore the “impossible dreams” of outdoors as an experience of self-discovery and self-development; the “into the wild” outdoors as an experience of reflection on the ills of modern society; we’ll explore the “lost city of the Incas” outdoors as a discovery of pre-modern civilizations; we ‘ll also explore the outdoors as a poetic and philosophical experience.

We will read nature haiku, “shanshui shi (Tang Dynasty mountain and stream poetry), outdoor journalistic writing such as articles from the Backpack and Outside magazines, “Into Thin Air,”“Into the Wild; “Wild,”“Lost City of the Incas”, we’ll also read excerpts from John Muir’s and Thoreau’s philosophical writings on nature and conservation, as well as Margaret Fuller’s Summer on the Lakes. We’ll watch both feature films and documentaries with the outdoors as the central focus.

JNST OOOG
BOOKS THAT MAKE YOU WANT TO READ
MWF 1-2:20 p.m. 
Room… HL 115
Bill McDonald

Here’s my proposal. Risking political incorrectness at Johnston, I’ve chosen the books rather than negotiating possibilities with you.  After all it’s my claim, not yours, that these books will make you “want to read.”  I chose them first for the pleasure and excitement they generate, and then because in quite different, and enriching, ways they open up our ideas about reading pleasure and our understanding of a few themes: love, human freedom, also childhood, and finally “last things.”   I also haven’t taken the easy path of just picking contemporary books, and have included a dialogue of Plato and two books from the 19th century; if you only know the readily accessible delights of your own time, your experience of pleasure is probably too narrow.  Expanding your pleasures, making you a more versatile hedonist (and reader, and thinker, and writer) is my goal.   Here’s the current version:
Tentative Reading List (as of 9/30/2015)
Introduction
BEGINNINGS: GREECE

Plato. Symposium
 John Fowles. The Magus.
 Anne Michaels.  Fugitive Pieces.  
 
BEGINNINGS: CHILDHOOD
 Emily Brontë. Wuthering Heights
 Lewis Carroll. Alice in Wonderland
 Jonathan Foer. Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close 
 ENDINGS:
 James Baldwin.  The Fire Next Time
 David Mitchell.  Cloud Atlas
 Italo Calvino.  If on a Winter’s Night a Traveler… 

JNST OOOH
Mindful Movement, Exploration and Reflection

3 units
Alana Wolfe and Leah Rippe
Sponsored by: Prof. Julie Townsend
Time: Monday's and Wednesday's 4-5:20 p.m.

Limited to 12 people to sign up online, until class starts then we may add more, if other people are interested.

Course Description
This course will explore movement through a variety of practices including somatic expression, dance therapy, yoga, and different types of meditation.

We are looking for students who are interested in holistic health and wellbeing. One who would be excited to participate in a course focused on active participation, learning through doing in class rather than outside reading and research (although we will have some supplemental readings and videos). An integral part of this course will be monitoring your progress and insights through journaling.
 
We want the class to be an intimate safe space, where interpersonal connection and discussion is fundamental because these movement practices and class discussions may evoke intense personal encounters with the Self.
 
We plan to meet once a week in the Meditation room of Bekins Hall or Bekins Lawn Monday and Wednesday evenings from 4-5:20 p.m. during the Spring Semester of 2016.

JNST OOOI
SLOW WRITING
Dr. Leslie Brody
Tuesday, 1-3:50 p.m. 

This creative writing class is designed for students willing to write primarily on paper, without the aid of any technical devices. We’ll work, as the masters of classic literature did in longhand. Over the course of the semester we’ll read some “slow texts” to inspire us, beginning with an ancient Chinese text called “The Art of Writing.”

By resisting the blandishments of speed and the imperative of technology we will attempt to re-discover the fundamentals of the creative process. This course is a laboratory not a workshop; but we will have ample time to share our work with one another. Our class is organized around the idea that slowing down will help student writers to produce exceptional work in a different way. This course doesn’t seek to return to a simpler time; rather it asks students to pause in order to look at the complexities and fundamentals of analysis, articulation, and rhetoric so they may express themselves in beautiful and eloquent ways.

Much of our early work will begin with in-class writing exercises. There will be a good deal of independent work as well as assigned group work. Students will occasionally be asked to read their work aloud. We’ll seek out quiet sanctuaries in which to write, and experiment with the concept of the “fair copy” written in ink. Naturally, students will be asked to keep a writers notebook. Over the course of the semester we will read fiction, essays, and poetry.

Final Project: A Writer’s Notebook and another Final Writer’s Project to be determined.

JNST OOOJ
Science, Sexuality, Society
T/TH  2:30-3:50 p.m.
Professor Tim Seiber

In this seminar, we will ask how scientific research, publication, and ideas have informed current and historical debates about sexuality.  Are sex and gender innate biologically?  How does the brain affect who and what we are attracted to?  Is there a ‘gay gene’?  Is identity somehow held materially in the body? The power of scientific discourse itself will be examined as well: where does “validity” and “proof” come from in experimental settings, and how does this map on to our experience of everyday life?  Using analytical tools developed by queer theorists interested in science, we’ll also ask how these ideas travel to other scientific understandings of the world – from how we see animals and conservation biology, to the way that we narrate to ourselves how molecules work by repulsion and attraction.

JNST OOOK
Reactions to Societal failure
M/W  11 a.m.-12:20 p.m.
Harlin Kahn
Sponsor: Prof. Sara Schoonmaker

Perhaps you subscribe to the idea that the world we live in is not always the most equitable or encouraging place. The current capitalist climate contributes to an idea that one person’s improvement is another’s suffering. Whether we view our current state as “Work-in-progress” a “fixer-upper” or just a straight out failure, this class addresses our need to explore ways in which we can deal with the problems of the United States and the world as a global whole.

We will start by exploring whether or not we believe our society has failed, and go on to ask one of the essential questions of this course: How terrible is our current state, and can it be fixed? If our answer gears toward a hopeful future, we will explore ways that change has been created- through laws, NGOs, community organizing, protest, riots, and anything else we can explore. Each way of reacting will hopefully be evaluated for our current climate– in an attempt to understand if this response is helpful, and how much change it can create. However if the class decides the world is too far-gone, we can spend our time exploring the ideas of retreatism and revolution– and ask ourselves if there is something groundbreaking we can rally around.

JNST 000L
Latin Tutorials
W/F  9:30-10:50 a.m.
Judith Tschann

For some of you, this Latin tutorial will be the second-semester continuation of intensive beginning college Latin.  We will quickly review some aspects of grammar from the first semester, and then plow ahead in Wheelock to the glorious end, covering such fine points of grammar as the various forms and uses of the subjunctive, deponent verbs, gerunds and gerundives, “fear” clauses, sequence of tenses, and much more.  We will emphasize the practice and theory of translation as we move beyond exercises to real (albeit highly edited) passages of literature and history.

For others, this tutorial will be an intensive beginning Latin class, requiring daily homework, memorizing, possible quizzes, a collaboratively designed midterm demonstration of learning, and an ambitious final project.  By the end of the semester, you will have a firm grasp of basic grammar (of Latin and of English), a developing sense of the joys and challenges of translating, a bigger vocabulary, and at least a budding interest in Roman literature and history.

JNST OOOM
Performances of Identity
Wednesday 6-8:50 p.m.
Facilitated by Cassidy Kean and Julia Lesser
Sponsor: Alisa Slaughter

Course Description:
How does finding the source of art help to understand positions of the self in the world? How does the creative process expose or conceal identity. Can the exploration of personal context enlighten art? Is there an impersonal self? These are some of the questions that the class, Performances of Identity will ask. This class will examine different artists from the 20th/21st century who exemplify identity in art. Simultaneously the class will take a practical approach and use our personal experiences as a platform for a final showcase. Together we will collaborate to develop a sense of the self in conjunction with exploring identities as a collective. The first half
of the semester will be spent looking at a wide range of artists and their contexts who cover several mediums. Here are some, just to name a few: Ana Mendieta, Robert Mapplethorpe, Patti Smith, Nina Simone, Amalia Ulman, Chris Krauss, and Kendrick Lamar. Each artist’s form varies from writing to sculpture, live performance to internet presence/social media performance, photography to music. During the second half of the semester we will use our personal ongoing discussions to produce an integrative exhibition. This class calls for curious and self motivated students who are willing to experiment in a critical, practical, and expressive way.

JNST OOON
Johnston Internal Transfer Seminar

1 unit
Mondays 6-7:20 p.m.
Faculty: M. G. Maloney
Co-Facilitators: Ash Hughes & Maya Joshua

Are YOU a First Year student thinking about transferring into Johnston? If YES, this seminar was designed specifically for YOU!

Parallel to the “Johnston First Year Seminar” (FYS) which all entering First Year students are required to take, the “Johnston Internal Transfer Seminar” (JITS) helps students learn the history of Johnston, Johnston’s specific practices and values of alternative education (e.g., course contract writing, self-evaluation, breadth, depth, and cross-cultural, consensus), and the value and practices of integrated learning.
As a “process” course, it is geared to help students understand Johnston educational and living-learning processes The “Internal Transfer Seminar” is a required course for all College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) students who plan to transfer into Johnston. This newly developed course was piloted last spring by Johnston Intern, Sam Corso. This year, JITS will be team taught by the Johnston Center Intern, Ash Hughes and Maya Joshua with Johnston’s Assistant Director M.G. Maloney. Within this seminar, CAS students interested in transferring are immersed into both the academic program and the community. By practicing collaboration with their peers, students gain a foundation of experience to best facilitate their success in an integrative learning environment.

JNST OOO O
Integrated Semester
Professor Tim Seiber

Seniors Only: This course is for students who want to complete a major project over the course of a single term, and who need space in their calendar to make this project complete.  It can be taken for 8-16 units, with most students taking it for 8 or 12.  As a reminder, each 4 units = approximately 12 hours per week for the entire semester.  The project must be interdisciplinary in nature, combining a variety of learning modes.  This can and should include: research, creative practice, experiential learning, analysis, and community organizing.  Students will meet each week to discuss a variety of topics related to project completion, and will meet periodically with the instructor throughout the semester to check in on the process. In addition to these meetings, students whose work primarily falls outside of Professor Seiber’s areas of expertise will be expected to have a faculty mentor, with whom they will meet to discuss their progress.  You must be able and willing to work independently to take this seminar. If you have questions about this class, please contact Tim in his office or via email at tim_seiber@redlands.edu.  This class is by permission only.  Permission will be granted to students who have completed the following application, and for whom this class seems an appropriate venue for their project. 
Application:

Please discuss with a faculty member your interest in this seminar.  Ask them if they could be your sponsor.  If they say yes, please ask them to send Professor Seiber a short email saying that they will sponsor your integrated semester project.

Write a 1-2 page application essay that addresses the following questions:
        What is the current plan for your project?  
         How is your idea interdisciplinary?
         Why does this project need the full 8-12 units, rather than you taking traditional seminars and contracting them? How many units do you plan for this project?
         What methods or materials will you use to complete this project, and will you need to apply to the Student Project Fund or other sources of revenue for supplies?
         How does this integrated semester fit in to your graduation contract?
         What is your plan for working with your faculty sponsor?  How will their support improve your work?
 
Print an updated version of your course list.

 Email Tim your updated course list and your 1-2 page application essay by NOVEMBER 15.  Applicants will be notified if they have been admitted to the seminar the following day, and add slips will be signed for admitted students.

JNST OOOP
Decadence and Its Rubble
T/Th  11 a.m.-12:20 p.m.
Julie Townsend and Daniel Kiefer

Decadence: falling away from aesthetic or moral elevation, especially in fin de siècle arabesques of beauty and horror, eroticism and death.

“Decadence is ‘an unstable word and concept, whose significations and weights continually change in response to shifts in morals, social and cultural attitudes, and even technology’…decadence has long named a recognizable (albeit shifting) constellation of ideas and metaphors, from the imagery of imperial Rome and the femme fatale, to sensual indulgence, philosophical pessimism, and sexual nonconformity.” – Matthew Potolsky.
We’d like to ask: What is decadence in literature (and perhaps painting and film?) How do the aesthetics of decadence engage with surrounding aesthetic, political, sexual, and social formations?  How have decadent aesthetics changed over time? And is decadence at play in our contemporary moment? 

William Shakespeare, Antony and Cleopatra (tragic play)
Caravaggio, paintings: with Derek Jarman, Caravaggio (1986 film)
John Keats, ‘Ode to a Nightingale,” ‘Ode to Melancholy,” “To Autumn” (poems)
Alfred Lord Tennyson, ‘Tithonus” (lyric poem)
Walter Pater, Conclusion to Studies in the History of Renaissance (criticism)
Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray (novel) and Salome (drama)
Arthur Schnitzler, Night Games (novella)
Richard Strauss, Salome (tragic opera)
Jane DeLynn, Don Juan in the Village 91990 novel)
Rachilde, The Juggler (novel 1990)
Huysmans, Against the Grain (novel 1884)
Baudelaire, The Flowers of Evil (poems 1857)
Vidal, Myra Breckenridge 91968) and film (1970)
Elaine Showalter, Ed., Selections from Daughters of Decadence
Olive Schreiner, ‘Three dreams in a desert” (short story)
Michael Field, poems
Films we might watch: Genet’s A Song of Love (1950), Pasolini’s  Salo 91975, not for the faint of heart), Velvet Goldmine (1998), Yash might join us for the Kill Bill (2003), Shortbus (2006)
Critical Essays we might read: David Weir on Decadence and Modernism, Eugenio Donato’s The Script of Decadence, Charles Bernheimer and Emily Apter from The Decadent Reader

JNST OOOQ
YOGA
Prof. Pat Geary
Tues./Thurs. 11 a.m.-12:20 p.m.
LAR 210
This course is an introduction to Hatha Yoga. We will stretch, breathe, and chant. Hatha Yoga prepares the body, physically and mentally, for meditation and relaxation. In addition to our classes in the Meditation Room, students are expected to maintain journals, read yoga books, and create an independent project of substance. Field trips to other yoga studios are encouraged but not required.

JNST OOOR
The Modernist City in Art and Film
M/W 2:30-3:50 p.m.
Prof. Piers Britton

From the 1880s to the 1960s urban architecture was the most visible expression of modernity, and of modernist visual styles. During the past hundred years the modern city has frequently been the site or subject of progressive art, from Orphism and Futurism to the Situationist International, and it has been both celebrated and critiqued in film from Metropolis to Blade Runner.  This seminar is an exploration of three artistic engagements with modernist architecture and urbanism.

JNST OOOS
A glimpse of Hindu Culture in Southern California
Monday – 1-2:20 p.m.
Prof. Pani Chakrapani
2 units

Context:
 A number of Hindus live in this area and they follow and practice their religion in various ways. One of the international organizations known as Chinmaya  Mission  (www.chinmayala.org) runs classes on Hinduism for children in grade schools.  About 30 children attend these classes on Sundays; since these classes are conducted in classrooms of our campus I am proposing this class for our students. The Sunday classes run from 9:45-11 a.m. Following class sessions, the parents, students and teachers assemble for about 30 minutes to discuss about the principles and practices of the religion. Some of those sessions include special prayer rituals as well.

The students in this program are divided into three groups based on their age. The kids progress from elementary level to senior level; they use textbooks written in English for their classes.

Johnston Course Objectives
 In this course, we will read the textbooks used in all these three sections in one semester.
  Every student will attend at least 4 Sunday sessions, to get an opportunity to talk to parents and children, in addition to attending a class session in each group.
  We will meet once a week to discuss course material.
  A number of video lectures are also accessible from the website above that can easily augment our understanding of the subject matter.
  Each student will identify a project of her own to bring together the learning of the material culled out from the books and the conversations.

JNST OOOT
Western and Chinese Medicine
M/Th    6-7:20 p.m.
Gilbert Chavez – student facilitator
Faculty advisor: Prof. James Blauth

Where science ends medicine begins; this is the territory we will explore in this course. We will ask three deceptively simple questions of medicine: does medicine reduce human suffering, what is medicine, and how should we treat people? We will begin with discussions on the production and delivery of Western Medicine by reading Ivan Illich's Medical Nemesis. Illich systematically demonstrates how medical institutions have robbed individuals, societies, and cultures, of their health and, what he argues, the very experience of life itself. From Illich's text we will begin considering how medicine and treatment might be changed to avoid the problems he outlines. We will do this through an in depth exploration of Chinese Medicine as read from Harriet Beinfield and Efrem Korngold's Between Heaven and Earth: A Guide to Chinese Medicine. We will learn about Chinese medical philosophies of Daoism, health, disease processes, diagnosis, and treatment. During our study of Chinese Medicine we will also consider the biological science and pseudoscience of these therapies with the goal of finding a middle ground for Western and Chinese Medicines.


Athletics are an important part of student life.
softball player

The University softball field was modeled after the one in "Field of Dreams."

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